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    Germs, genetics and childhood leukaemia

    Mel Greaves received a knighthood late last year for his research into why children develop leukaemia. In this article from The Guardian, he explains how it’s now understood that a combination of genetic mutations in the womb, and chronic inflammation in response to infection, can lead to leukaemia developing. Greaves is currently working on a ‘cocktail of microbes’ that could block the inflammation response, potentially reducing the risk of leukaemia and other diseases.

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    Maddy Ritchie: I Don’t Know How She Does It

    Being 17 is complicated enough. Being told you have a rare pelvic tumour can really turn your world upside down. Meet Maddy: she’s now in her early 20s, two years cancer-free and a passionate volunteer with cancer charities. She speaks candidly about treatment, fertility, spirituality and how she got through her experience. From MamaMia’s ‘I Don’t Know How She Does It’ podcast series.

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    Cognitive difficulties after brain cancer

    The Conversation outlines the ways that cancer in a child’s brain has the potential to impact their overall future health and cause long-term disturbances to the central nervous system of survivors.intro Known as ‘late effects’, these cognition and communication difficulties can affect personal and social development. Early intervention can lessen the impact of such difficulties on survivors.   Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on brain cancer and late effects, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.  

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    Danielle’s story: One day at a time

    They say that our first love will stay in our hearts forever. This couldn’t be more true for 26-year Danielle Paparone. At 19 she was swept off her feet by an affable young man with striking blue eyes. After a blissful year together, he was diagnosed with a brain tumour. However, treatment was unsuccessful, and he died three years after diagnosis. Danielle shares her incredible love story with Cancer Advisor and tells us how she turns her pain into purpose. “He had very big blue eyes and that’s what drew me in,” Danielle says. Jake first laid his big blue Read more [...]

  • For young adults – cancer and your family

    If you’re a young person diagnosed with cancer you probably have lots of questions about how it will affect your family. While every family is different and has its own strengths and quirks, it may be helpful to consider some common questions. Click on a section below to see some tips and hints, as well as recommendations for further reading. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for young people facing cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Neuroblastoma staging

    Cancer Australia’s factsheet provides an overview of neuroblastoma staging and the symptoms and treatment that can be experienced. It covers topics such as risk factors for the disease, how diagnosis is made, and what support services are available. Diagnostic tests will also help indicate the stage of the tumour. Staging determines where the tumour is, how large it is, which nearby organs are involved, and whether the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. This will be important for the treatment team to assess the best options, and to determine the prognosis for your child. See below for a Read more [...]

  • “I draw childhood cancer” – Cartoons by Angus

    I Draw Childhood Cancer is a Facebook page by talented artist Angus Olsen. His daughter Jane was diagnosed with Embryonic Rhabdomyosarcoma at 3 years old. Ever since he has created various works communicating the experience of having a child with cancer. He also draws other children from all across the world in ways that show their strength and beauty. On his Facebook page he writes: In 2016 our 2yo daughter was diagnosed with RMS cancer. In the nightmare I drew and it helped me. Now I draw childhood cancer and it somehow helps others. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal Read more [...]

  • “To the mom whose child just received a cancer diagnosis”

    To the mom whose child just received a cancer diagnosis is a heartfelt letter published on The Mighty. This insightful piece was written by Pauline Grady, whose son Sam is about to end his cancer treatment who says she is feeling lost. “I started thinking about the different emotions I’ve felt since the beginning,” she explains. “How lost I was at the beginning, how I felt I’d found a side of myself I never knew existed and how I’m now feeling lost again. Lost, found, lost.” Pauline begins her letter “Dear New Cancer Mom” as she reaches out to all the mothers Read more [...]

  • Monkey In My Chair – Australia

    We signed up for Monkey in My Chair and were so happy with the program. It is a great way for your child to stay in touch with friends at school. It is an American program, but there is an Australian chapter as well. I recommend this to anyone whose child is out of school for a while on treatment. The program includes: A manual for the teachers, filled with information and resources A story book which will help the teacher to explain the child’s illness and any special needs A life-sized stuffed monkey that sits on the child’s chair Read more [...]

  • A guide for grandparents of children with cancer

    Redkite’s 36-page information booklet helps grandparents of children with cancer. Redkite spoke extensively with grandparents to understand their experiences. This booklet answers some of the many questions which grandparents of children with cancer told Redkite they would have liked answered when their grandchild was diagnosed and during their grandchild’s treatment phase. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for grandparents, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Battle Weapons: A coping guide for young people with cancer

    Hi, my name is Nell and I’m the author of Battle Weapons: A coping guide for young people with cancer. I’m also a nurse and a cancer survivor. In high school, when we started the discussion about our future, my career advisor suggested nursing. This really appealed to me; to serve and support people at their most vulnerable is a great honour and privilege. Nursing is very diverse and I wasn’t sure for a long time where I wanted to take it, until I was diagnosed with cancer. I know my life’s purpose is to help those with cancer, particularly young people. Read more [...]

  • “I draw childhood cancer” – Cartoons by Angus

    I Draw Childhood Cancer is a Facebook page by talented artist Angus Olsen. His daughter Jane was diagnosed with Embryonic Rhabdomyosarcoma at 3 years old. Ever since he has created various works communicating the experience of having a child with cancer. He also draws other children from all across the world in ways that show their strength and beauty. On his Facebook page he writes: In 2016 our 2yo daughter was diagnosed with RMS cancer. In the nightmare I drew and it helped me. Now I draw childhood cancer and it somehow helps others. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal Read more [...]

  • Ritchie’s story: Caring for a child with cancer and Down syndrome

    In January Ritchie Farrugia was told his six-year-old daughter Bella had Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia also known as ALL. Bella also has Down syndrome and at the time of diagnosis, Ritchie had already been her full-time carer for the last four years. Cancer Advisor spoke to him about being a dad in a children’s hospital ward and how Down syndrome affects cancer treatment. What’s it like being a dad in a children’s hospital ward? The first few months I stayed at the hospital full-time with Bella. My wife’s back is not too good, not that mine was great but, it was Read more [...]

  • Lymphoma Australia resources, hotlines and more

    Lymphoma Australia is the only national charity dedicated to Lymphoma. Lymphoma Australia’s resources include: a factsheet on all you need to know about hodgkin lymphoma and the different subtypes. It explains the cancer, how it is diagnosed, the treatment involved, supports available and treatments under investigation. It is available to download and print from Lymphoma Australia website. a resource booklet for anyone with a new diagnosis of lymphoma including all information you need to know about this cancer, the lymphatic system, how it is diagnosed, different treatments, supports available and clinical trials. It is available to order online, download or print through Read more [...]

  • “To the mom whose child just received a cancer diagnosis”

    To the mom whose child just received a cancer diagnosis is a heartfelt letter published on The Mighty. This insightful piece was written by Pauline Grady, whose son Sam is about to end his cancer treatment who says she is feeling lost. “I started thinking about the different emotions I’ve felt since the beginning,” she explains. “How lost I was at the beginning, how I felt I’d found a side of myself I never knew existed and how I’m now feeling lost again. Lost, found, lost.” Pauline begins her letter “Dear New Cancer Mom” as she reaches out to all the mothers Read more [...]

  • Siblings You Matter! – a short documentary

    Hi, My name is Genevieve Stonebridge, and I am a clinical counsellor in Victoria, BC, Canada. I created this short video ‘You Matter’ from a research study I did on the experience of undiagnosed siblings who had a brother or sister with cancer. If you want to know why I created this video and my personal connection to cancer, please read more below. If you want to just skip to learning some ways you can help support siblings then please press play!   Why I made this video: When I was 18 I was diagnosed with and treated for Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (that Read more [...]

  • Dads open up about their child’s cancer treatment

    Professional British footballer and children’s writer Frank Lampard visits a CLIC Sargent Home from Home in the UK to meet with some of the dads who have a child with cancer.   These raw and powerful personal stories offer an eye-opening insight to some of the ways fathers have coped with their child’s cancer diagnosis. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for dads whose children have cancer. Or, if you have any questions that need answering, please let us know on our Feedback and Contact form. We want to help you find what you’re looking for. Before you go We’d love Read more [...]

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