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    Help for brothers and sisters – a video for kids

    When it comes to childhood cancer, brothers and sisters of a diagnosed child have specific needs. In fact, many “well” siblings will report feeling alone, lost and neglected. While there are various materials available that have been specifically written for parents to help address these needs, we’ve found a resource that is specifically geared to kids themselves – both the diagnosed and the well sibling! The Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation in the U.S. created this fun and educational video as a way to emotionally support siblings of kids with cancer. The video is part of the Imaginary Friend Society series and was Read more [...]

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    Keeping your child healthy during cancer remission

    This factsheet from US website familydoctor.org offers some information and tips for parents when their child finishes treatment. Whether your child is in partial or complete remission, you may have questions like ‘what do I do next?’ and fears like ‘what if the cancer comes back?’ This article covers some topics including: Nutrition and exercise, Keeping records of your child’s treatment, and Late effects. To end this resources suggests Questions to ask your doctor such as: What kinds of symptoms should I look for that mean I should call you? What doctors should my child see now that the cancer is Read more [...]

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    Cultural barriers in cancer treatment: Aboriginal communities

    VJOncology (The Video Journal of Oncolgoy) has created a video about the cultural barriers in cancer treatment in regards to Aboriginal communities. In this three minute video, Jasmine Micklem, PhD, of the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute talks with Roslyn Weetra, an Aboriginal Elder and cancer survivor. Even though this video was created in South Australia, Doctor Micklem talks about these barriers as a nationwide issue. She opens with, “We found across all of the states there are disparities, particularly around mortality.” She continues that Aboriginal people are diagnosed with cancer at the same rate as other Australians, however, Read more [...]

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    10 tips for coping with scanxiety by a cancer survivor

    As the name suggests, scanxiety is the anxiety a person feels in the lead-up to a cancer-detecting scan. It also includes the anxiety when waiting for the results after a scan. On Cure Today, childhood cancer survivor Tori Tomalia talks about her 10 tips for coping with scanxiety. Tori was cancer-free for over 20 years before she was diagnosed with lung cancer. The mother of three is also a wife, theatre artist, writer and lung cancer awareness advocate. Since her diagnosis in 2013 she has been having scans every three months. She says, “The week or so leading up to my Read more [...]

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    Kids meet and interview a kid with cancer

    HiHo Kids has created a sweet and amusing video called “Kids Meet a Kid With Cancer” featuring Kira, an 8-year-old cancer survivor. HiHo Kids is a humorous YouTube channel created in Seattle that features a series of interviews with a cast of diverse American kids. These unscripted videos are broken off into topics such as: Kids Meet – the kids meet different types of people such a magician, deaf person or little person; Kids Try – the kids are given various foods to sample from across the globe; and Kids Describe – the kids describe things like their parents, love Read more [...]

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    ‘Cancer Anger,’ explained by a therapist

    “Cancer Anger” is a common experience for people facing cancer. In this Mighty article on Cancer Anger, therapist Karin Sieger explains: What is cancer anger? When does it happen? Who gets it? And what can you do about it? Karin writes: “Cancer anger is a normal response to fear, despair and grief – a range of feelings which cancer brings into our lives. It can show as frustration, irritability, emotional withdrawal or aggression. You can feel it whether you have been diagnosed or you are a relative or friend. Cancer anger can happen at any stage of the illness, even years after treatment.” Have you experienced Read more [...]

  • I draw childhood cancer

    I Draw Childhood Cancer is a Facebook page by talented artist Angus Olsen. His daughter Jane was diagnosed with Embryonic Rhabdomyosarcoma at 3 years old. Ever since he has created various works communicating the experience of having a child with cancer. He also draws other children from all across the world in ways that show their strength and beauty. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal stories, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • “To the mom whose child just received a cancer diagnosis”

    To the mom whose child just received a cancer diagnosis is a heartfelt letter published on The Mighty. This insightful piece was written by Pauline Grady, whose son Sam is about to end his cancer treatment who says she is feeling lost. “I started thinking about the different emotions I’ve felt since the beginning,” she explains. “How lost I was at the beginning, how I felt I’d found a side of myself I never knew existed and how I’m now feeling lost again. Lost, found, lost.” Pauline begins her letter “Dear New Cancer Mom” as she reaches out to all the mothers Read more [...]

  • Monkey In My Chair – Australia

    We signed up for Monkey in My Chair and were so happy with the program. It is a great way for your child to stay in touch with friends at school. It is an American program, but there is an Australian chapter as well. I recommend this to anyone whose child is out of school for a while on treatment. The program includes: A manual for the teachers, filled with information and resources A story book which will help the teacher to explain the child’s illness and any special needs A life-sized stuffed monkey that sits on the child’s chair Read more [...]

  • A guide for grandparents of children with cancer

    Redkite’s 36-page information booklet helps grandparents of children with cancer. Redkite spoke extensively with grandparents to understand their experiences. This booklet answers some of the many questions which grandparents of children with cancer told Redkite they would have liked answered when their grandchild was diagnosed and during their grandchild’s treatment phase. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for grandparents, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Battle Weapons: A coping guide for young people with cancer

    Hi, my name is Nell and I’m the author of Battle Weapons: A coping guide for young people with cancer. I’m also a nurse and a cancer survivor. In high school, when we started the discussion about our future, my career advisor suggested nursing. This really appealed to me; to serve and support people at their most vulnerable is a great honour and privilege. Nursing is very diverse and I wasn’t sure for a long time where I wanted to take it, until I was diagnosed with cancer. I know my life’s purpose is to help those with cancer, particularly young people. Read more [...]

  • I draw childhood cancer

    I Draw Childhood Cancer is a Facebook page by talented artist Angus Olsen. His daughter Jane was diagnosed with Embryonic Rhabdomyosarcoma at 3 years old. Ever since he has created various works communicating the experience of having a child with cancer. He also draws other children from all across the world in ways that show their strength and beauty. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal stories, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Siblings You Matter! – a short documentary

    Hi, My name is Genevieve Stonebridge, and I am a clinical counsellor in Victoria, BC, Canada. I created this short video ‘You Matter’ from a research study I did on the experience of undiagnosed siblings who had a brother or sister with cancer. If you want to know why I created this video and my personal connection to cancer, please read more below. If you want to just skip to learning some ways you can help support siblings then please press play!   Why I made this video: When I was 18 I was diagnosed with and treated for Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (that Read more [...]

  • “To the mom whose child just received a cancer diagnosis”

    To the mom whose child just received a cancer diagnosis is a heartfelt letter published on The Mighty. This insightful piece was written by Pauline Grady, whose son Sam is about to end his cancer treatment who says she is feeling lost. “I started thinking about the different emotions I’ve felt since the beginning,” she explains. “How lost I was at the beginning, how I felt I’d found a side of myself I never knew existed and how I’m now feeling lost again. Lost, found, lost.” Pauline begins her letter “Dear New Cancer Mom” as she reaches out to all the mothers Read more [...]

  • What not to say to someone with cancer

    BBC 3 has created a video of things not to say to someone with cancer including: “So is it all working down there?” “How long do you have left?” “You’re so brave” The video also gives a good insight into various people’s personal experiences with cancer, and finishes with the question, “What should you say?” Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for friends and relatives of people with cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Dads open up about their child’s cancer treatment

    Professional British footballer and children’s writer Frank Lampard visits a CLIC Sargent Home from Home in the UK to meet with some of the dads who have a child with cancer.   These raw and powerful personal stories offer an eye-opening insight to some of the ways fathers have coped with their child’s cancer diagnosis. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for dads whose children have cancer. Or, if you have any questions that need answering, please let us know on our Feedback and Contact form. We want to help you find what you’re looking for. Before you go We’d love Read more [...]

  • What not to give your oncologist for Christmas

    In this SoundCloud podcast Doctor Geoff McCowage, a Paediatric Oncologist and Senior Staff Specialist at The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, talks about the people who deserve a Christmas present more than the oncologist. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on hospital information, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

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