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    Re-Mission 2 – a video game for kids with cancer

    Re-Mission 2 games is an online video game created by Hopelab. The game aims to give kids and young adults with cancer a sense of power and control. The website say the games “help kids and young adults with cancer take on the fight of their lives. Based on scientific research, the games provide cancer support by giving players a sense of power and control and encouraging treatment adherence.” All six Re-Mission 2 games can be played online for free. The Re-Mission 2: Nanobot’s Revenge mobile app is available for download on iOS. “In 2014, Re-Mission 2: Nanobot’s Revenge, our cancer-fighting mobile app for iOS Read more [...]

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    From cancer patient to university graduate

    In this story published by UNSW, Adry Awan talks about how he went from cancer patient to university graduate. Below he talks a bit about why he wrote this piece. When I was diagnosed with an aggressive form of testicular cancer at the age of 17, I believed that I would not be able to achieve my dream of going to university. I was in year 12 at the time of my diagnosis, working hard to pass the HSC. Like all my classmates, I was ready to reap the rewards of all of my hard work and begin the adventures Read more [...]

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    Explainer: What is nanomedicine and how can it improve childhood cancer treatment?

    The Conversation has published an article about how Australian researchers are looking at how they can use nanomedicine to improve the side effects of cancer treatment for children. What is nanomedicine?  Nano means tiny – a nanometre is one-billionth of a metre! – and nanomedicine is the use of nanoparticles in medicine. This article talks about using nanoparticles to transport drugs to places they wouldn’t be able to go on their own. How does that help with side effects?  Nanoparticles can be designed to: better target cancer cells, which means less damage to healthy cells break down into harmless byproducts transport Read more [...]

  • “How bravery beads help us” – Nic and Izzy’s story

    On Cancer Advisor, Nic shares why her daughter, Izzy, uses bravery beads. Mothers Day 2018 will be a day that I will never forget. My 12-year-old daughter was diagnosed with AML – Acute Myeloid Leukaemia. We were admitted to Westmead Children’s Hospital and a few days later a beautiful French speaking Lady, Anne, came into our room. She gave Izzy the choice of a cloth bag and then presented her with what would become her journey of beads. The journey would start with some coloured beads, her name and a love heart. At the time it did not seem like Read more [...]

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    Advice on problems paying your mortgage

    The Australian Government website, Money Smart, offers advice to help you manage your mortgage if you’re having problems with your repayments. The website provides the steps a lender can take if you fall behind on your repayments, and the details of where you can get help. It covers how to contact your lender; get help with your repayments; the steps a lender can take if you are behind on mortgage repayments; and traps to avoid slipping further into debt.” Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on finances and cancer, but we are always looking for more content. Register now to contribute content, Read more [...]

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    Clinical trials bring hope – Lesley and Casey’s story

    On the Dell’s Children website, a mother and father share their story about how clinical trials brought hope to their family during their son’s cancer treatment. Rex was 17 months old when he was diagnosed with high-risk neuroblastoma. The article says: “Upon Rex’s diagnosis, Lesley and her husband, Casey, knew their family faced a long, uphill battle.  High-risk neuroblastoma is an aggressive and deadly form of childhood cancer, and the odds for survival were not in their child’s favor.  They agreed to enroll Rex into a clinical trial study using an experimental drug, Unituxin, for children with high-risk neuroblastoma.” In this Read more [...]

  • “I draw childhood cancer” – Cartoons by Angus

    I Draw Childhood Cancer is a Facebook page by talented artist Angus Olsen. His daughter Jane was diagnosed with Embryonic Rhabdomyosarcoma at 3 years old. Ever since he has created various works communicating the experience of having a child with cancer. He also draws other children from all across the world in ways that show their strength and beauty. On his Facebook page he writes: In 2016 our 2yo daughter was diagnosed with RMS cancer. In the nightmare I drew and it helped me. Now I draw childhood cancer and it somehow helps others. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal Read more [...]

  • “To the mom whose child just received a cancer diagnosis”

    To the mom whose child just received a cancer diagnosis is a heartfelt letter published on The Mighty. This insightful piece was written by Pauline Grady, whose son Sam is about to end his cancer treatment who says she is feeling lost. “I started thinking about the different emotions I’ve felt since the beginning,” she explains. “How lost I was at the beginning, how I felt I’d found a side of myself I never knew existed and how I’m now feeling lost again. Lost, found, lost.” Pauline begins her letter “Dear New Cancer Mom” as she reaches out to all the mothers Read more [...]

  • Monkey In My Chair – Australia

    We signed up for Monkey in My Chair and were so happy with the program. It is a great way for your child to stay in touch with friends at school. It is an American program, but there is an Australian chapter as well. I recommend this to anyone whose child is out of school for a while on treatment. The program includes: A manual for the teachers, filled with information and resources A story book which will help the teacher to explain the child’s illness and any special needs A life-sized stuffed monkey that sits on the child’s chair Read more [...]

  • A guide for grandparents of children with cancer

    Redkite’s 36-page information booklet helps grandparents of children with cancer. Redkite spoke extensively with grandparents to understand their experiences. This booklet answers some of the many questions which grandparents of children with cancer told Redkite they would have liked answered when their grandchild was diagnosed and during their grandchild’s treatment phase. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for grandparents, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Battle Weapons: A coping guide for young people with cancer

    Hi, my name is Nell and I’m the author of Battle Weapons: A coping guide for young people with cancer. I’m also a nurse and a cancer survivor. In high school, when we started the discussion about our future, my career advisor suggested nursing. This really appealed to me; to serve and support people at their most vulnerable is a great honour and privilege. Nursing is very diverse and I wasn’t sure for a long time where I wanted to take it, until I was diagnosed with cancer. I know my life’s purpose is to help those with cancer, particularly young people. Read more [...]

  • “I draw childhood cancer” – Cartoons by Angus

    I Draw Childhood Cancer is a Facebook page by talented artist Angus Olsen. His daughter Jane was diagnosed with Embryonic Rhabdomyosarcoma at 3 years old. Ever since he has created various works communicating the experience of having a child with cancer. He also draws other children from all across the world in ways that show their strength and beauty. On his Facebook page he writes: In 2016 our 2yo daughter was diagnosed with RMS cancer. In the nightmare I drew and it helped me. Now I draw childhood cancer and it somehow helps others. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal Read more [...]

  • Ritchie’s story: Caring for a child with cancer and Down syndrome

    In January Ritchie Farrugia was told his six-year-old daughter Bella had Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia also known as ALL. Bella also has Down syndrome and at the time of diagnosis, Ritchie had already been her full-time carer for the last four years. Cancer Advisor spoke to him about being a dad in a children’s hospital ward and how Down syndrome affects cancer treatment. What’s it like being a dad in a children’s hospital ward? The first few months I stayed at the hospital full-time with Bella. My wife’s back is not too good, not that mine was great but, it was Read more [...]

  • Siblings You Matter! – a short documentary

    Hi, My name is Genevieve Stonebridge, and I am a clinical counsellor in Victoria, BC, Canada. I created this short video ‘You Matter’ from a research study I did on the experience of undiagnosed siblings who had a brother or sister with cancer. If you want to know why I created this video and my personal connection to cancer, please read more below. If you want to just skip to learning some ways you can help support siblings then please press play!   Why I made this video: When I was 18 I was diagnosed with and treated for Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (that Read more [...]

  • “To the mom whose child just received a cancer diagnosis”

    To the mom whose child just received a cancer diagnosis is a heartfelt letter published on The Mighty. This insightful piece was written by Pauline Grady, whose son Sam is about to end his cancer treatment who says she is feeling lost. “I started thinking about the different emotions I’ve felt since the beginning,” she explains. “How lost I was at the beginning, how I felt I’d found a side of myself I never knew existed and how I’m now feeling lost again. Lost, found, lost.” Pauline begins her letter “Dear New Cancer Mom” as she reaches out to all the mothers Read more [...]

  • Dads open up about their child’s cancer treatment

    Professional British footballer and children’s writer Frank Lampard visits a CLIC Sargent Home from Home in the UK to meet with some of the dads who have a child with cancer.   These raw and powerful personal stories offer an eye-opening insight to some of the ways fathers have coped with their child’s cancer diagnosis. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for dads whose children have cancer. Or, if you have any questions that need answering, please let us know on our Feedback and Contact form. We want to help you find what you’re looking for. Before you go We’d love Read more [...]

  • What not to say to someone with cancer

    BBC 3 has created a video of things not to say to someone with cancer including: “So is it all working down there?” “How long do you have left?” “You’re so brave” The video also gives a good insight into various people’s personal experiences with cancer, and finishes with the question, “What should you say?” Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for friends and relatives of people with cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

What would you say to someone who’s just found out their child has cancer?

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