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    Evaluating health information on the internet

    The Sydney Children’s Hospital Network has created a factsheet called Evaluating health information on the internet to help you navigate health information. It says, “It is important to evaluate the information you have found during a search on the Internet to make sure it is accurate and comes from a reliable source. When evaluating, think critically and don’t accept any information at face value.” making a bullet point list more list and more The factsheets also suggests that you ask yourself questions such : Who is responsible for the website or social media channel? Is the information accurate? Is the information Read more [...]

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    Navigating finances – using insurance during cancer

    If you’re facing cancer, navigating insurance entitlements might not be on your radar. We’ve found some resources that could help you understand the various insurance entitlements out there and how you can access them. Have we missed something? If there is a finance question you need answered, please don’t hesitate to let us know and we will do what we can to answer it for you. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on finances and cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

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    Questions to ask your doctor at diagnosis

    The Cancer Council has created a list of questions you might like to ask your doctor and treating team about your diagnosis, treatment and clinical trials. On the website it says: “When cancer is diagnosed you enter into a partnership with your doctor and other health care professionals. To help you get the best care you have the right to: ask questions be specifically informed about the details of your care make an informed choice of treatment from the options available to you It is important to ask questions, especially if you are unsure or unclear and feel you need Read more [...]

  • Helping a child to understand cancer

    The US website Cancer.Net offers advice to help a child understand cancer. They say: “For most parents, few things are as frightening as hearing from the doctor that your child has cancer. Parents are dealing with their own fears and confusion at this time. Yet, they must also face the task of helping their child understand his or her diagnosis.” It suggests what to tell your child based on their age and is broken up into age-appropriate sections including: aged 0-3, aged 3-7, aged 7-12, and teenagers. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for parents of children with cancer, but we Read more [...]

  • What to say to your friend who has just been bereaved

    This blog post on Let’s Talk About Loss discusses what to say to your friend who has just been bereaved. The author of the blog is Beth Rowland whose mother died when she was 20. However, the practical advice in this post is also relevant for people hoping to support and communicate with a bereaved parent. Beth says, “I’ve experienced my fair share of people ‘putting their foot in it’ and saying the wrong thing, so I’m going to attempt to pass on a few pearls of wisdom about what to say – and what not to say – when the Read more [...]

  • Supporting sleep in young cancer patients

    Sleeping difficulties are common among children and adolescents, and cancer patients are no exception. In fact, children with cancer are especially susceptible to difficult sleep and need particular support to get the rest needed for health and recovery. Why Sleep is Difficult for Young People With Cancer Whether in a hospital setting or undergoing treatment at home, young people with cancer may experience disturbed sleep due to environmental conditions, side effects, and schedules. In a hospital setting, young cancer patients may be disturbed by environmental conditions, including sounds and lights throughout the night (and daytime, if napping). Disruptions from medical Read more [...]

  • Children’s hospitals in Australia

    Children’s hospitals (also known as paediatric hospitals) specialise in the medical needs of children and teenagers. At children’s hospital the staff are specifically trained in taking care of children and teenagers. Chances are there will also be more child-geared activities on hand such as kids films and child entertainers. Expand the boxes below to learn more about children’s hospitals in each state. Some children’s hospitals do not treat children’s cancer, so you may need to move to a different state for treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for families who need to do this, including personal stories from Read more [...]

  • Nutrition tips for children during cancer treatment

    You’re probably aware that nutrition plays a huge part in a child’s overall health and wellbeing at any stage of their lives. However, did you know that nutrition may also help your child to better tolerate their cancer treatment, fight infection and assist with their recovery? Here’s what the experts have to say about the best way to approach nutrition during a child’s cancer treatment. Also, please go easy on yourself and remember that it’s okay to be flexible and cut corners while your child is in hospital. It won’t cause any harm if you serve Weet-bix for dinner or Read more [...]

  • ONTrac at Peter Mac

    The ONTrac at Peter Mac Cancer Service is located at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Victoria, Australia. Their multidisciplinary team of health professionals works together to ensure that young people are supported before, during and after their cancer treatment. This web page includes information on clinical services for young people like: diagnosis and disease management, palliative and survivorship care, general adolescent health, emotional and mental health concerns, fertility and sexual health, physical and nutritional wellbeing, school and vocation support, and family-focused treatments. The service also provides : Secondary consultation service, Professional development, education and training, research and data collection program, Read more [...]

  • How your general practice team can support you

    This fact sheet from the Australian Cancer Survivorship Centre (ACSC) offers information about involving your general practice team in your healthcare following cancer treatment. It offers some key insights and tips: • Your GP is the cornerstone of your healthcare. • Make a long appointment with your GP to develop an after treatment health plan. • Your GP and GPN are well placed to help you manage the effects of cancer treatment. • Your GP and GPN can support you to make healthy lifestyle choices. • Lifestyle changes may help reduce the risk of cancer coming back, and help you Read more [...]

  • For teachers: Cancer in the school community

    This booklet from Camp Quality offers tips for supporting children facing cancer in the school environment. This may include children with cancer, siblings of children with cancer, or children who have a parent with cancer. For any school experiencing cancer, it is important that teachers and support staff are equipped to educate the children about cancer and answer any difficult questions. Common questions from classmates include: How did they get sick? Can I catch it? Should I share things that are bothering me? They seem silly or trivial compared to what my friend is going through. What am I supposed Read more [...]

  • For teachers: 5 ways to help a student with cancer

    This article by We Are Teachers offers teachers some guidance on how to welcome a child back to school after cancer treatment. Children undergoing cancer treatment often miss significant amounts of class, and returning back to school can be a daunting experience. Teachers have an important role to play in ensuring the child has a smooth transition back into the classroom environment. This article covers some tips for teachers to help: Roll out – or roll up – the red carpet Personalise the learning Include the student in ALL class activities Facilitate friendships Talk to the child about everyday things Cancer Read more [...]

  • Children’s painful procedures and operations factsheet

    The Sydney Children’s Hospital Network has created a factsheet offering tips and advice on children’s painful procedures and operations. As a parent you know your child best, and can therefore greatly assist staff in helping your child cope with the procedure or surgery. Be honest and calm when informing your child about the procedure and answering his/her questions. Decide on which coping strategies you and your child think would be most helpful. It is generally helpful for a child to have a parent present during a painful procedure and/or when your child wakes up after surgery. If you feel unable Read more [...]

  • Cooking for a cancer patient on a budget

    In this article by I Had Cancer, chef Ryan Callahan offers some useful tips on cooking for a cancer patient on a budget. Cancer is expensive, so these cost saving ideas can help keep you on track. His tips include: Set a monetary budget and stick to it Plan a menu for the week Don’t impulse purchase Prep and freeze perishable items Use your leftovers to make other dishes Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on nutrition, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Going back to school after cancer

    This article from 13thirty talks about the different feelings young people have about going back to school. It also offers some useful tips for how to make the transition easier. Please note: This content was written in the USA and may be targeted to US audiences. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on school, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • After Cancer: Tips to Get Your Child Back on Track

    Life after childhood cancer may look a little different. In this article, the Cleveland Clinic chats with pediatric oncologist Seth Rotz, MD who has come up with six tips to get your child back on track, including:  Use school and community resources to support learning and development Work with an ophthalmologist to watch for vision changes Monitor hearing during and after cancer therapy Work closely with your dentist Follow your doctor’s guidelines to watch for secondary cancers Teach your child to focus on healthy lifestyle choices Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on life after cancer, but we’re always looking for Read more [...]

  • Breakdown of the healthy eating pyramid

    Solaris Cancer Care has published a blog on the healthy eating pyramid. This simple visual guide shows the types and proportion of foods that we should eat every day for good health based on the AUSTRALIAN DIETARY GUIDELINES (2013). Note: Solaris Cancer Care published this blog post on June 2nd, 2015. For more information, Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on nutrition. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • Easy ways to improve your vocabulary and reading

    St. Jude Hospital’s LIFE study staff have created a one-page tip sheet on easy ways to improve your vocabulary and reading after  childhood cancer. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • Helping your child to eat during cancer treatment

    Helping your child to eat during cancer treatment is an accessible 15-page PDF. This online resource was developed by the UK Children’s Cancer and Leukaemia Group and offers practical advice and tips on how your child’s treatment may affect their diet and what you can do about it. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on nutrition. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • Understanding complementary therapies

    Understanding complementary therapies is an 88-page online booklet developed by the Cancer Council. Cancer Council (and Cancer Advisor) only support complementary therapies which have been found safe and effective in scientific studies. This booklet explores therapies such as meditation and relaxation, support groups, art therapy, music therapy, aromatherapy, acupuncture and yoga. It also looks at how these therapies can be used alongside your standard treatment for cancer. Always speak with your treating team if you are planning on taking any treatment or therapies outside of your standard treatment for cancer. Have you had any experience with complementary therapies? Let us know in the comments Read more [...]