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Cancer Advisor
July 31, 2019
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  • Cognitive difficulties after brain cancer

    The Conversation outlines the ways that cancer in a child’s brain has the potential to impact their overall future health and cause long-term disturbances to the central nervous system of survivors.intro Known as ‘late effects’, these cognition and communication difficulties can affect personal and social development. Early intervention can lessen the impact of such difficulties on survivors.   Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on brain cancer and late effects, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.  

  • Adult hospitals and treatment centres in Australia

    When it comes to hospital and treatment centres, teenagers and young people facing cancer have a unique set of needs. Where a young person is treated will most likely depend on their age. If you’re a young adult, you’ll go to an adult hospital. However, teenagers can be sent to either a children’s hospital or an adult facility. What hospital you go to may also depend on where you live or even what type of cancer you have. Not all hospitals offer cancer treatment, so you may have to travel, especially if you live in a regional or rural area. Some […]

  • Cancer survivor and amputee’s cute Halloween costume

    The Mighty has shared a very cute story: titled 3-Year-Old Cancer Survivor Proves You Don’t Need Two Arms to Enjoy Halloween. The article is about Scarlette, a three-year-old amputee and cancer survivor. Scarlette and her mother Simone found a fun and creative way to celebrate Halloween. Simone says, “When she was born, which was four weeks early, her left arm was gigantic … It was about three times the size of her right arm. They had no idea what to make of it.” After many tests, Scarlette was diagnosed with undifferentiated high-grade spindle cell sarcoma, a rare type of cancer. “We did a […]

  • Advice on friendship during your cancer journey

    This article Cancer and your friends from Redkite offers some advice around friendship during your cancer journey. Often young people find telling their friends about their cancer diagnosis particularly difficult. Even without cancer, people and relationships change – you may find that certain friendships change and new ones may emerge. Some ways to maintain friendships during this time include: Try to be honest and open with them if you can and lean on them when you need to Warn them you may be snappy or angry at times and ask them to forgive you if needed Ask them to keep inviting you […]

  • Advice for kids who have a friend with cancer

    If your child’s friend is diagnosed with cancer, you might be wondering how this could impact your child and what steps you can take to help them. We hope these resources have been helpful. If we’ve missed something, please let us know. We want to help you find what you’re looking for. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources with practical tips, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Cancer survivor creates empathy cards

    Emily McDowell has created these empathy cards for people with serious illnesses. As a cancer survivor herself, Emily understands that sometimes people don’t know what to say to someone when they are diagnosed with cancer. “The most difficult part of my illness wasn’t losing my hair, or being erroneously called ‘sir’ by Starbucks baristas, or sickness from chemo. It was the loneliness and isolation I felt when many of my close friends and family members disappeared because they didn’t know what to say, or said the absolute wrong thing without realizing it.” – Emily McDowell These quirky empathy cards will […]

  • Children’s hospitals in Australia

    Children’s hospitals (also known as paediatric hospitals) specialise in the medical needs of children and teenagers. At children’s hospital the staff are specifically trained in taking care of children and teenagers. Chances are there will also be more child-geared activities on hand such as kids films and child entertainers. Expand the boxes below to learn more about children’s hospitals in each state. Some children’s hospitals do not treat children’s cancer, so you may need to move to a different state for treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for families who need to do this, including personal stories from […]

  • Leaving hospital

    When a child or young person finishes cancer treatment it can be a time of mixed emotions. Often this is a long anticipated event, and when it feels like they should be happy and celebrating, families may also feel anxious and overwhelmed. Leaving hospital and going home will be a different experience for each person, but Cancer Advisor has some resources on finishing treatment that may be useful. “Leaving hospital can be a scary time for a lot of families. They talk about leaving the safety net of the hospital, leaving their oncology family. Often losing this close support is the […]

  • Nutrition tips for children during cancer treatment

    You’re probably aware that nutrition plays a huge part in a child’s overall health and wellbeing at any stage of their lives. However, did you know that nutrition may also help your child to better tolerate their cancer treatment, fight infection and assist with their recovery? Here’s what the experts have to say about the best way to approach nutrition during a child’s cancer treatment. Also, please go easy on yourself and remember that it’s okay to be flexible and cut corners while your child is in hospital. It won’t cause any harm if you serve Weet-bix for dinner or […]

  • Bereavement and grief

    Bereavement is the loss of someone through death, and grief is our response to loss. The grief that follows a young person’s death lasts a lifetime, and losing a child to cancer is one of the most devastating things that can happen to any family. When your child dies is a booklet from Redkite that uses the real experiences of bereaved parents to help other parents and carers following the death of their child.  It is important to remember that grief is personal and unique – everybody grieves differently and that’s okay. There will be a number of different factors that will […]

  • Bald Cartoons – free posters and profile pics

    Bald Cartoons is a Brazilian website featuring a range of famous cartoon characters with their heads shaved to help children with cancer not feel ‘different’. The website and heartwarming video below was created by cancer advocacy group GRAACC. The video shows the reactions of children when they see bald characters including Garfield, Hello Kitty and Snoopy. The website also allows families to print out posters or download social media profile pics. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on wellbeing, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Looking after yourself during cancer

    This page from Redkite gives an overview of how to take care of yourself physically and emotionally during your cancer journey. A large part of dealing with cancer is learning how to take care of yourself so that you are better prepared for challenges, but also ready to enjoy good things that come your way. Redkite offers tips on: Self-care Looking after your body Looking after your mind Having fun and taking risks Redkite provides a range of support services for young people with cancer including practical tips, financial assistance, and professional counselling. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources […]

  • “TJ’s Cancer Journey” – A mum’s blog about her teenager

    TJ’s Cancer Journey is a blog about my 15-year-old son who was diagnosed with Hodgkin Lymphoma at the age of 14. I am documenting my son’s journey with cancer so that one day he can look back at it and remember everything he went through during this difficult time. Hopefully our experiences will be able to help others who are going through similar. It is a journal of his cancer experience so far and includes: how he felt when he was diagnosed; how cancer has affected him and those around him; what treatment he is receiving; what tests he has completed; […]

  • Relapse after cancer as a teen or young adult

    Sometimes, despite the best care and significant progress made in treatment, cancer comes back. When this happens it is called a recurrence or relapse. The likely relapse occurs is that a few of the original cancer cells survived the initial treatment. Sometimes, this is because cancer cells spread to other parts of the body and were too small to be detected during the follow-up immediately after treatment. There can be a lot to manage if you experience relapse after cancer as a teen or young adult. This factsheet by Redkite offers an insight into some of the questions you might be asking yourself […]

  • Cancer treatment for teens and young adults

    This factsheet from Redkite gives an overview on cancer treatment for teens and young adults including: types of cancer treatment, complementary therapy and cancer, clinical trials, side effects, and sticking with treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on cancer treatment, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource. Join our community Cancer Advisor is an online platform with a wide range of cancer advice and knowledge. We provide information for families of children and young people with cancer. You’ll be directed to external websites and sources featuring reliable information […]

  • Advocate for your rights

    What are your rights as someone with cancer? And how can you protect or advocate for these rights? This factsheet by Work After Cancer is funded by the Australian Government to help you understand the law and what your rights and responsibilities are as a person with cancer. Your rights and responsibilities as a patient with cancer: You have a right to fair treatment You do not have to disclose your cancer diagnosis You cannot be denied a job because of cancer You can ask for a reasonable work adjustments You have a responsibility to inform your employer when taking […]

  • 8 resources for when your child goes back to school after treatment

    If your child has finished their cancer treatment, you might be wondering how they will transition back into full time study. Your child may be looking forward to the social aspect of school … although, they may be nervous too.  Perhaps you’re keen for a new sense of routine, and school seems like a good way to add some structure post-treatment.  You might also be wondering what information or support your child’s teacher will need. Here are some helpful resources if your child is about to start back at school, or just needs some extra support adjusting. 1  A teacher’s […]

  • If treatment doesn’t work for your cancer

    If treatment doesn’t work is a Redkite information sheet about what happens if your cancer is not curable. It includes topics such as managing emotion, avoidance and distraction, hope and making choices. Being told that your cancer is not curable and facing the idea of dying is the hardest news most people can imagine hearing. Please know that the Redkite support team are here for you and those close to you at this time. Further Reading Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on End of Life including sibling grief, grandparent grief and paediatric palliative care. Please note: if you have any questions that need […]

  • Managing work and finances during cancer

    This resource from Redkite provides an overview on managing work and finances during cancer. Practical issues like continuing work or managing bills during treatment can become significant worries for young people facing cancer. If you are a young person with cancer, or you are supporting someone through their cancer journey this web page may help. You may also be eligible for Redkite’s Financial Assistance, check out their financial help page to see if you can get any additional support. If you are eligible for this support, it may include help covering the essentials such as: Bills for electricity, gas, water, rates, […]

  • Teen Girl Living With Cancer – Ellie’s Story

    Teen Girl Living with Cancer is a personal blog by childhood cancer advocate, Ellie. You can also follow her on YouTube, Instagram and Facebook. At 14 years old Ellie was diagnosed with a rare childhood cancer called Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma. “It totally flipped my life upside down but now I can use all the horrible experiences I had to inspire and advise you guys.” At the time of writing, her Instagram and Facebook pages were the most up-to-date. On her instagram she says: NED since 22/01/16. I’m in remission. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, […]

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