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Cancer Advisor
July 31, 2019
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Factsheet
  • Adult hospitals and treatment centres in Australia

    When it comes to hospital and treatment centres, teenagers and young people facing cancer have a unique set of needs. Where a young person is treated will most likely depend on their age. If you’re a young adult, you’ll go to an adult hospital. However, teenagers can be sent to either a children’s hospital or an adult facility. What hospital you go to may also depend on where you live or even what type of cancer you have. Not all hospitals offer cancer treatment, so you may have to travel, especially if you live in a regional or rural area. Some […]

  • Navigating finances – using insurance during cancer

    If you’re facing cancer, navigating insurance entitlements might not be on your radar. We’ve found some resources that could help you understand the various insurance entitlements out there and how you can access them. Have we missed something? If there is a finance question you need answered, please don’t hesitate to let us know and we will do what we can to answer it for you. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on finances and cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Discussing your child’s cancer over social media

    If you’re a parent, you may be wondering how to talk about your child’s cancer over social media. The Paediatric Integrated Cancer Service (PICS) has created a factsheet to help you carefully use social media websites and emails to share and discuss your child’s cancer information. On the website it says: “Responsible use of social media by parents and, more so, teenagers, is critical to safeguard your family’s privacy regarding personal information and information about your child’s cancer diagnosis and treatment. There are potential risks and dangers that may not be apparent at present but may prove harmful later on in […]

  • Who is who in your treating team at hospital

    If you are about to go to hospital for cancer treatment you might be wondering who is who in your treating team at hospital. Canteen has published a list of who is who in a hospital medical team. “They could be involved in: Administering treatment, Giving you information and advice. Or simply supporting you and your family during this time” The treating team includes: Medical Oncologist Radiation Oncologist Surgical Oncologist Radiologist Oncology Nurse Specialist Registered Nurse Registrar Resident/Intern It also discusses the roles of a social worker, physiotherapist, clinical psychologist and a dietitian. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on the […]

  • Leaving hospital

    When a child or young person finishes cancer treatment it can be a time of mixed emotions. Often this is a long anticipated event, and when it feels like they should be happy and celebrating, families may also feel anxious and overwhelmed. Leaving hospital and going home will be a different experience for each person, but Cancer Advisor has some resources on finishing treatment that may be useful. “Leaving hospital can be a scary time for a lot of families. They talk about leaving the safety net of the hospital, leaving their oncology family. Often losing this close support is the […]

  • Total body irradiation

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is the term used when radiotherapy is given to the whole body. Radiotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses high energy rays, similar to x-rays. TBI may be used in conjunction with high dose chemotherapy drugs. This is often used in preparation for a stem cell or bone marrow transplant.  This fact sheet from the Paediatric Integrated Cancer Service (PICS) provides information on total body irradiation. The resource gives an overview of: What is total body irradiation? Getting ready for total body irradiation What is it like? Taking care of your child during total body […]

  • Advice and information on fatigue caused by brain tumours

    Fatigue can be a challenging side effect of brain tumours. If you have a brain tumour you may be wondering about how you can navigate this side effect. This factsheet from UK organisation The Brain Tumour Charity provides information and practical suggestions for coping with the emotional and physical aspects of fatigue caused by brain tumours. To open the factsheet explains: “Fatigue is often described as a persistent feeling of being tired, weak, worn out, slow or heavy. It is a common symptom for people with all types and grades of brain tumour. Cancer-related fatigue is often talked about, but less acknowledged […]

  • 10 tips for coping with scanxiety by a cancer survivor

    As the name suggests, scanxiety is the anxiety a person feels in the lead-up to a cancer-detecting scan. It also includes the anxiety when waiting for the results after a scan. On Cure Today, childhood cancer survivor Tori Tomalia talks about her 10 tips for coping with scanxiety. Tori was cancer-free for over 20 years before she was diagnosed with lung cancer. The mother of three is also a wife, theatre artist, writer and lung cancer awareness advocate. Since her diagnosis in 2013 she has been having scans every three months. She says, “The week or so leading up to my […]

  • Bereavement and grief

    Bereavement is the loss of someone through death, and grief is our response to loss. The grief that follows a young person’s death lasts a lifetime, and losing a child to cancer is one of the most devastating things that can happen to any family. When your child dies is a booklet from Redkite that uses the real experiences of bereaved parents to help other parents and carers following the death of their child.  It is important to remember that grief is personal and unique – everybody grieves differently and that’s okay. There will be a number of different factors that will […]

  • How your general practice team can support you

    This fact sheet from the Australian Cancer Survivorship Centre (ACSC) offers information about involving your general practice team in your healthcare following cancer treatment. It offers some key insights and tips: • Your GP is the cornerstone of your healthcare. • Make a long appointment with your GP to develop an after treatment health plan. • Your GP and GPN are well placed to help you manage the effects of cancer treatment. • Your GP and GPN can support you to make healthy lifestyle choices. • Lifestyle changes may help reduce the risk of cancer coming back, and help you […]

  • Battle Weapons: A coping guide for young people with cancer

    Hi, my name is Nell and I’m the author of Battle Weapons: A coping guide for young people with cancer. I’m also a nurse and a cancer survivor. In high school, when we started the discussion about our future, my career advisor suggested nursing. This really appealed to me; to serve and support people at their most vulnerable is a great honour and privilege. Nursing is very diverse and I wasn’t sure for a long time where I wanted to take it, until I was diagnosed with cancer. I know my life’s purpose is to help those with cancer, particularly young people. […]

  • Lymphoma Australia resources, hotlines and more

    Lymphoma Australia is the only national charity dedicated to Lymphoma. Lymphoma Australia’s resources include: a factsheet on all you need to know about hodgkin lymphoma and the different subtypes. It explains the cancer, how it is diagnosed, the treatment involved, supports available and treatments under investigation. It is available to download and print from Lymphoma Australia website. a resource booklet for anyone with a new diagnosis of lymphoma including all information you need to know about this cancer, the lymphatic system, how it is diagnosed, different treatments, supports available and clinical trials. It is available to order online, download or print through […]

  • Cancer information for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

    The Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council Cancer Council NSW has created cancer information resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. One of the resources is Aboriginal cancer journeys: Our stories of kinship, hope and survival is a factsheet and a booklet of stories from Indigenous people affected by cancer. The PDF was created with funding provided by Cancer Australia, the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW and Cancer Council NSW. This page also links to the Aboriginal Cancer Council website with information about cancer, treatment, support and research. It includes information for the community and health workers […]

  • Post-traumatic stress symptoms after cancer

    Stanford Children’s Health in the USA has put together a list of post-traumatic stress symptoms after childhood and adolescent cancer They say, “It is important that your child receives high quality emotional care during and after cancer treatment to avoid the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).” Cancer Advisor has a range of content on emotional wellbeing, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Questions to ask your doctor – Leukaemia Foundation

    The Leukaemia Foundation has created a list of general questions to ask your doctor at both diagnosis and routine appointments. Cancer Advisor has a range of content on questions to ask your treating team, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Children’s painful procedures and operations factsheet

    The Sydney Children’s Hospital Network has created a factsheet offering tips and advice on children’s painful procedures and operations. As a parent you know your child best, and can therefore greatly assist staff in helping your child cope with the procedure or surgery. Be honest and calm when informing your child about the procedure and answering his/her questions. Decide on which coping strategies you and your child think would be most helpful. It is generally helpful for a child to have a parent present during a painful procedure and/or when your child wakes up after surgery. If you feel unable […]

  • What adult cancer care can learn from paediatrics

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has published a PDF on what adult cancer care can learn from paediatrics. They write: “Cancer care varies in its service quality, whether the patients are adults or children. However, pediatric cancer centers follow three core principles that enhance their patients’ overall care experience. This article distills those principles, with the aim of helping adult cancer centers learn from what pediatric centers do well.” The three core principles are: Embrace play Tailor the communication Focus on families, not just patients Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for young people with cancer, but […]

  • Understanding changes in thinking and memory

    Understanding changes in thinking and memory is a 3-page factsheet by the Cancer Council. This factsheet covers areas such as: What is cancer-related cognitive impairment? How can thinking and memory be affected? What causes cognitive changes? Who is affected? How long does it last? Effect on your emotional wellbeing Managing thinking and memory changes What is cognitive rehabilitation? Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on the effects of cancer treatment, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • When to call the hospital

    As a parent of a child with cancer you might be wondering when to call the hospital. The Paediatric Integrated Cancer Service (PICS) has put together a handy one-page factsheet that you can print out and put on your fridge. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources with tips and hints, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

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