• Adult hospitals and treatment centres in Australia

    When it comes to hospital and treatment centres, teenagers and young people facing cancer have a unique set of needs. Where a young person is treated will most likely depend on their age. If you’re a young adult, you’ll go to an adult hospital. However, teenagers can be sent to either a children’s hospital or an adult facility. What hospital you go to may also depend on where you live or even what type of cancer you have. Not all hospitals offer cancer treatment, so you may have to travel, especially if you live in a regional or rural area. Some Read more [...]

  • Navigating finances – using insurance during cancer

    If you’re facing cancer, navigating insurance entitlements might not be on your radar. We’ve found some resources that could help you understand the various insurance entitlements out there and how you can access them. Have we missed something? If there is a finance question you need answered, please don’t hesitate to let us know and we will do what we can to answer it for you. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on finances and cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Cancer survivor and amputee’s cute Halloween costume

    The Mighty has shared a very cute story: titled 3-Year-Old Cancer Survivor Proves You Don’t Need Two Arms to Enjoy Halloween. The article is about Scarlette, a three-year-old amputee and cancer survivor. Scarlette and her mother Simone found a fun and creative way to celebrate Halloween. Simone says, “When she was born, which was four weeks early, her left arm was gigantic … It was about three times the size of her right arm. They had no idea what to make of it.” After many tests, Scarlette was diagnosed with undifferentiated high-grade spindle cell sarcoma, a rare type of cancer. “We did a Read more [...]

  • Tosh’s story: how he helped end his daughter’s cancer

    After more than two years of chemotherapy, Tosh Nagashima helped end his daughter’s cancer. Cancer Advisor called him to talk about his family’s experience. In March 2014 four-year-old Bella was diagnosed with high-risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL). After arriving at the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne in an ambulance, Bella started chemotherapy immediately. During treatment, Bella’s father continued to work full-time and take care of their youngest daughter Olivia while his wife Vanie spent day and night in the hospital. “After work I would visit Bella in the hospital every day,” he explains. “It was hard for her younger sister Read more [...]

  • Questions to ask your doctor at diagnosis

    The Cancer Council has created a list of questions you might like to ask your doctor and treating team about your diagnosis, treatment and clinical trials. On the website it says: “When cancer is diagnosed you enter into a partnership with your doctor and other health care professionals. To help you get the best care you have the right to: ask questions be specifically informed about the details of your care make an informed choice of treatment from the options available to you It is important to ask questions, especially if you are unsure or unclear and feel you need Read more [...]

  • Australian children’s cancer clinical trials registry

    The Australian and New Zealand Haemotolgy/Oncology Centre (ANZCHOG) has created a children’s cancer clinical trials registry. On the website it says: “This registry lists all clinical trials open to children and adolescents with cancer or blood disorders currently in progress at children’s cancer centres in Australia. This information should be used in conjunction with advice from health care professionals.” ANZCHOG also answers FAQs such as: What is a clinical trial? What does it mean for my child? Who should I talk to about potential clinical trials? How can I receive more information? Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on Read more [...]

  • Bone tumours in children and teenagers

    Cancer Australia gives an overview of bone tumours in children and teenagers. The web page says, “Bone tumours occur when abnormal cells in the bones grow in an uncontrolled way. There are 2 main types of bone tumours in children: Osteosarcoma forms from cells called osteoblasts. It usually develops at the ends of the long bones, such as the arms or legs. Ewing sarcoma (also called Ewing family of tumours) forms from a type of stem cell in the bone marrow. It can form in the bones of the arms, legs, hands, feet, spine, skull, ribs, shoulder blades or hips. Ewing sarcomas can also Read more [...]

  • Childhood cancer survivor brings hope to cancer patients

    In this six-minute video we see how a childhood cancer survivor brings hope to young cancer patients. Georgia was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive form of leukaemia at just eight weeks old. She was also one the youngest Australians to receive a bone marrow transplant. Twenty years on, she has devoted her life to helping children with cancer as a camp leader. In this ABC video that featured on the 7:30 report, her family share their story with the ABC. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal stories, but we are always looking for more content. Register now to contribute content, Read more [...]

  • Advice for kids who have a friend with cancer

    If your child’s friend is diagnosed with cancer, you might be wondering how this could impact your child and what steps you can take to help them. We hope these resources have been helpful. If we’ve missed something, please let us know. We want to help you find what you’re looking for. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources with practical tips, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Helping a child to understand cancer

    The US website Cancer.Net offers advice to help a child understand cancer. They say: “For most parents, few things are as frightening as hearing from the doctor that your child has cancer. Parents are dealing with their own fears and confusion at this time. Yet, they must also face the task of helping their child understand his or her diagnosis.” It suggests what to tell your child based on their age and is broken up into age-appropriate sections including: aged 0-3, aged 3-7, aged 7-12, and teenagers. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for parents of children with cancer, but we Read more [...]

  • Childhood cancer: Reflections from a sister

    In this short video from the American Cancer Society, Sophie opens up about what it’s like to be sister to a child with cancer. Sophie’s brother was just three years old when he was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma. Although her brother survived his cancer, Sophie talks about the lasting emotional impact it has had on her. She talks about her experience as a sibling, noting that cancer had a profound impact on her formative years. When a child or a young person is diagnosed with cancer, the enormity of this is felt throughout the family. In particular, siblings of any age feel the Read more [...]

  • Transport and accommodation assistance NSW

    The Isolated Patients Travel and Accommodation Assistance Scheme (IPTAAS) is a NSW Government initiative.  Designed to help isolated patients, IPTAAS offer financial assistance towards transport and accommodation costs.  This is for patients who need to travel long distances for specialist medical treatment that is not available locally. To be eligible to claim through IPTAAS you must meet the following criteria: Be a resident of NSW or Lord Howe Island Hold a Medicare card Live more than 100km from the nearest treating specialist or your combined trips to and from the specialist exceeds 200km/week Specialist treatment not available locally Ineligible for any other Read more [...]

  • Working through treatment

    In this 11-minute TED Talk, lawyer Sarah Donnelly talks about her experiences working through treatment for breast cancer.  You can find a range of resources on work and study here. “Back at work I handed over the urgent things (…) but at that moment work wasn’t my priority. I was thinking how I was going to tell my friends and family I had cancer. I was wondering if my partner and I would ever have an opportunity to start a family (…) Work was about to play a huge role in my treatment and recovery. My job that would give me Read more [...]

  • Rare Cancers Australia – KnowledgeBase Patient Support Program

    Rare Cancers Australia has developed the KnowledgeBase as a part of their Patient Support Program aimed at providing patients with a centre of knowledge, guidance, advice and hope. The web page includes a wide range of resources including directories for: Cancer Types Cancer Services Health Professionals Support Services Clinical Trials  Childhood cancers are, by definition, rare or less common (RLC) cancers. There are over 200 different types of RLC cancers, so navigating services and treatment can be difficult for patients and their families. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on rare cancers, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave Read more [...]

  • “Cancer helped form the person I am” – Sam’s story

    For many years, Sam Alderton-Johnson (30) felt shame and despair when he recalled his memories of suffering from leukaemia as a young boy of 14. “When you’re younger you have this warped idea of what masculinity is,” Sam explains. “I thought that being that very sick kid was a terrible time in my life that I never wanted to engage with, that was until I got older and I realised it had helped form the person I am.” As a teenager, Sam enjoyed sports immensely, however, his life was turned upside down with his diagnosis of leukaemia. He remembers the Read more [...]

  • Kids Kicking Cancer: martial arts therapy

    Kids Kicking Cancer is a not-for-profit organisation that teaches the mind-body techniques of Martial Arts instruction, breath work and meditation to empower children beyond the pain and discomfort of disease. Kids Kicking Cancer now offers help and services to not only cancer patients, but any child in pain from a serious illness. They currently operate the Heroes’ Circle program in America, Canada, Israel and Italy and support ill children and their siblings aged 3-23 years old. Using martial arts therapy, Kids Kicking Cancer staff teaches ill children and their siblings to: Regain a sense of control over the chaos of their Read more [...]

  • Humans of New York: paediatric cancer

    Humans of New York has published a series of stories and photographs on paediatric cancer. The content was gathered from the Pediatrics Department of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and includes quotes such as: “All doctors have those patients who sit on our shoulder.” “My biggest challenge? Two words for you: third grade. It’s kind of like second grade but harder.” “A big part of a nurse’s job is translation.” “And the hardest part about being an oncologist is trying to be patient.” “I got cancer in the summer when the pools were opening.” “So I’m afraid all the time. And Read more [...]

  • Imaginary Friend Society – explaining cancer to kids

    Imaginary Friend Society is a series of animation videos that explains cancer to kids in a sensitive and fun way. The series was created by the Paediatric Brain Foundation and covers both the medical and emotional aspects of cancer in an effort to make children more comfortable while facing cancer. Some of the videos include topics such as: Finding out you have cancer Why am I tired all the time? How to handle shots Returning to school Being scared Long hospital stays Blood transfusions, and Feeling sad.   Cancer Advisor has a range of resources to help parents of a child Read more [...]