• From cancer patient to university graduate

    In this story published by UNSW, Adry Awan talks about how he went from cancer patient to university graduate. Below he talks a bit about why he wrote this piece. When I was diagnosed with an aggressive form of testicular cancer at the age of 17, I believed that I would not be able to achieve my dream of going to university. I was in year 12 at the time of my diagnosis, working hard to pass the HSC. Like all my classmates, I was ready to reap the rewards of all of my hard work and begin the adventures Read more [...]

  • Cancer survivor and amputee’s cute Halloween costume

    The Mighty has shared a very cute story: titled 3-Year-Old Cancer Survivor Proves You Don’t Need Two Arms to Enjoy Halloween. The article is about Scarlette, a three-year-old amputee and cancer survivor. Scarlette and her mother Simone found a fun and creative way to celebrate Halloween. Simone says, “When she was born, which was four weeks early, her left arm was gigantic … It was about three times the size of her right arm. They had no idea what to make of it.” After many tests, Scarlette was diagnosed with undifferentiated high-grade spindle cell sarcoma, a rare type of cancer. “We did a Read more [...]

  • Late effects of childhood cancer treatment

    Cancer.Net has created a video on late effects of childhood cancer treatment. They spoke with Doctor Lisa Diller who is a Member of the American Society of Clinical Oncolgy. Doctor Diller outlines the importance of watching for late effects of treatment for childhood cancer survivors. Doctor Diller describes late effects as the side effects of the cancer treatment that occurs well after the cancer has been cured. She says to think of them as “effecting parts of the body that were detrimentally effected by therapy” such as chemotherapy, surgery or radiation. Watch the video below to find out more. Cancer Read more [...]

  • Childhood cancer survivor brings hope to cancer patients

    In this six-minute video we see how a childhood cancer survivor brings hope to young cancer patients. Georgia was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive form of leukaemia at just eight weeks old. She was also one the youngest Australians to receive a bone marrow transplant. Twenty years on, she has devoted her life to helping children with cancer as a camp leader. In this ABC video that featured on the 7:30 report, her family share their story with the ABC. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal stories, but we are always looking for more content. Register now to contribute content, Read more [...]

  • Angus’ story: Being a transgender childhood cancer survivor

    On the New Zealand website, Stuff, a transgender cancer survivor shares his story of his upcoming mastectomy. Angus Coleman was diagnosed with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) at just 16 months old. LCH is s a rare type of cancer that can damage tissue, or cause lesions to form in one or more places in the body. During his time with cancer, Angus had ongoing treatment from an endocrinologist, which is now helping him take his next steps in his gender transition. “I was actually set up with an endocrinologist back when I was diagnosed with langerhans​ cell histiocytosis​ [rare cancer]which is actually the doctor you need to see Read more [...]

  • Rhi’s story: adjusting to a new normal after cancer treatment

    My son Connor was diagnosed with cancer at three years old. Thankfully he is currently in remission. Now that I finally have spare moments to breathe and reflect upon the whole traumatic journey of childhood cancer I have to admit that one of the most difficult parts was coming home. When my son was diagnosed with stage IV neuroblastoma At the time of diagnosis we lived in Collinsville, a small mining community in rural North Queensland. Initially we were flown to Townsville hospital. After three days and much investigation we were transferred to Brisbane via Royal Flying Doctors. Our oncologist Read more [...]

  • Financial checkups after childhood cancer

    Childhood cancer survivors need financial checkups as adults. The US website Marketwatch explains that in addition to health checkups, cancer survivors will need financial checkups post treatment too. The article referenced a study published by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in New York City. The study included almost 3,000 long-term paediatric cancer survivors aged between 18 and 65. “More than half said they were worried about paying for care and one-third said finances kept them from seeking medical care. (They were, on average, 23 years from their diagnosis and all had been treated at St. Jude.)”     Beyond the impact that Read more [...]

  • Sarcoma survivor advocates for sarcoma awareness

    Dominique Schell is a sarcoma survivor. In her TEDx talk, the 20 year old shares her personal experience of childhood cancer. In this speech, she talks about how as a survivor she feels an obligation to advocate for all the children who die of sarcoma each year. Schell was diagnosed with osteosarcoma at 10 years old, and in the 10 years following had many complications as the result of her initial surgery. She had eight chemotherapy sessions each lasting a week, which she describes as hell. Her side effects included weight loss, cravings, exhaustion, vomiting and hair loss. She says Read more [...]

  • Keeping your child healthy during cancer remission

    This factsheet from US website familydoctor.org offers some information and tips for parents when their child finishes treatment. Whether your child is in partial or complete remission, you may have questions like ‘what do I do next?’ and fears like ‘what if the cancer comes back?’ This article covers some topics including: Nutrition and exercise, Keeping records of your child’s treatment, and Late effects. To end this resources suggests Questions to ask your doctor such as: What kinds of symptoms should I look for that mean I should call you? What doctors should my child see now that the cancer is Read more [...]

  • Rare Cancers Australia – KnowledgeBase Patient Support Program

    Rare Cancers Australia has developed the KnowledgeBase as a part of their Patient Support Program aimed at providing patients with a centre of knowledge, guidance, advice and hope. The web page includes a wide range of resources including directories for: Cancer Types Cancer Services Health Professionals Support Services Clinical Trials  Childhood cancers are, by definition, rare or less common (RLC) cancers. There are over 200 different types of RLC cancers, so navigating services and treatment can be difficult for patients and their families. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on rare cancers, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave Read more [...]

  • How your general practice team can support you

    This fact sheet from the Australian Cancer Survivorship Centre (ACSC) offers information about involving your general practice team in your healthcare following cancer treatment. It offers some key insights and tips: • Your GP is the cornerstone of your healthcare. • Make a long appointment with your GP to develop an after treatment health plan. • Your GP and GPN are well placed to help you manage the effects of cancer treatment. • Your GP and GPN can support you to make healthy lifestyle choices. • Lifestyle changes may help reduce the risk of cancer coming back, and help you Read more [...]

  • “Cancer helped form the person I am” – Sam’s story

    For many years, Sam Alderton-Johnson (30) felt shame and despair when he recalled his memories of suffering from leukaemia as a young boy of 14. “When you’re younger you have this warped idea of what masculinity is,” Sam explains. “I thought that being that very sick kid was a terrible time in my life that I never wanted to engage with, that was until I got older and I realised it had helped form the person I am.” As a teenager, Sam enjoyed sports immensely, however, his life was turned upside down with his diagnosis of leukaemia. He remembers the Read more [...]

  • Kids Kicking Cancer: martial arts therapy

    Kids Kicking Cancer is a not-for-profit organisation that teaches the mind-body techniques of Martial Arts instruction, breath work and meditation to empower children beyond the pain and discomfort of disease. Kids Kicking Cancer now offers help and services to not only cancer patients, but any child in pain from a serious illness. They currently operate the Heroes’ Circle program in America, Canada, Israel and Italy and support ill children and their siblings aged 3-23 years old. Using martial arts therapy, Kids Kicking Cancer staff teaches ill children and their siblings to: Regain a sense of control over the chaos of their Read more [...]

  • Adult sleep problems after childhood cancer

    The American Association of the Advancement of Science has reported that childhood cancer survivors are more likely to experience sleep problems as adults. “Results show that cancer survivors were more likely than siblings to report sleep problems as adults … survivors were 31 percent more likely to report daytime sleepiness and 26 percent more likely to have poor ‘sleep efficiency,’.” The study involved nearly 2000 childhood cancer survivors. “Participants had a mean age of 35 years and a mean time since diagnosis of 23.5 years. The study also involved 380 siblings with a mean age of 33 years.” Cancer Advisor has Read more [...]

  • Post-traumatic stress symptoms after cancer

    Stanford Children’s Health in the USA has put together a list of post-traumatic stress symptoms after childhood and adolescent cancer They say, “It is important that your child receives high quality emotional care during and after cancer treatment to avoid the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).” Cancer Advisor has a range of content on emotional wellbeing, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Finding hope during childhood cancer – Nancy’s story

    Not ‘just’ a moment is a heartfelt and poetic piece written by Nancy Hamner about finding hope, published on the US website 2Surviveonline. Nancy is a mother whose son Ryan was first diagnosed with cancer at aged six. He has survived four occurrences of hodgkin lymphoma during his childhood. In her personal story she offers up pieces of wisdom such as:  Life is not always what it appears; it is possibly never what it looks like. [H]is doctor has given us a plan, and with that is bestowed the option of hope—a place we choose to live. May you see joy and Read more [...]

  • Tips for facing post-treatment side effects

    In this 2Survive blog post, childhood cancer survivor Ryan offers tips for facing post-treatment side effects including: Know Your Drugs Be Ready Follow Up Be A Jerk Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on life after cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Going back to school after cancer

    This article from 13thirty talks about the different feelings young people have about going back to school. It also offers some useful tips for how to make the transition easier. Please note: This content was written in the USA and may be targeted to US audiences. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on school, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Weightlifting at nine year’s old – Ryan’s story

    OnUS blog 2Surviveonline a cancer survivor called Ryan discusses how weightlifting at nine year’s old helped him through cancer. He says, “When I was a kid, I was extremely small from cancer treatment. Chemotherapy made it where I could not really eat so well (shocker). Then there was that whole puking thing that I’m sure many of you survivors know about. But enough of the whining.” Ryan’s grandfather said he would give him a dollar for every pound he put on. Go to his blog to find out more. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal stories, but we’re always looking Read more [...]

  • Leukaemia survivor ‘blows something up’

    Leukaemia survivor Declan, who is currently in remission after being diagnosed  in 2015, has made a special request to Make-A-Wish Australia. After surviving childhood cancer, Declan’s wish was to blow something up. The 12-year-old was allowed to spend the day with Australian Federal Police’s (AFP) Specialist Response Group at its Majura headquarters in Canberra. He had the opportunity to see his wish come true; blowing up walls, doors and even have his name spelled out by explosives on a special training ground. You can watch Declan’s experience in the video below. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal stories, but we’re always looking for Read more [...]