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  • “I draw childhood cancer” – Cartoons by Angus

    I Draw Childhood Cancer is a Facebook page by talented artist Angus Olsen. His daughter Jane was diagnosed with Embryonic Rhabdomyosarcoma at 3 years old. Ever since he has created various works communicating the experience of having a child with cancer. He also draws other children from all across the world in ways that show their strength and beauty. On his Facebook page he writes: In 2016 our 2yo daughter was diagnosed with RMS cancer. In the nightmare I drew and it helped me. Now I draw childhood cancer and it somehow helps others. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal Read more [...]

  • Ritchie’s story: Caring for a child with cancer and Down syndrome

    In January Ritchie Farrugia was told his six-year-old daughter Bella had Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia also known as ALL. Bella also has Down syndrome and at the time of diagnosis, Ritchie had already been her full-time carer for the last four years. Cancer Advisor spoke to him about being a dad in a children’s hospital ward and how Down syndrome affects cancer treatment. What’s it like being a dad in a children’s hospital ward? The first few months I stayed at the hospital full-time with Bella. My wife’s back is not too good, not that mine was great but, it was Read more [...]

Most Recent

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    Germs, genetics and childhood leukaemia

    Mel Greaves received a knighthood late last year for his research into why children develop leukaemia. In this article from The Guardian, he explains how it’s now understood that a combination of genetic mutations in the womb, and chronic inflammation in response to infection, can lead to leukaemia developing. Greaves is currently working on a ‘cocktail of microbes’ that could block the inflammation response, potentially reducing the risk of leukaemia and other diseases.

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    Maddy Ritchie: I Don’t Know How She Does It

    Being 17 is complicated enough. Being told you have a rare pelvic tumour can really turn your world upside down. Meet Maddy: she’s now in her early 20s, two years cancer-free and a passionate volunteer with cancer charities. She speaks candidly about treatment, fertility, spirituality and how she got through her experience. From MamaMia’s ‘I Don’t Know How She Does It’ podcast series.