•  

    Soft tissue sarcoma

    This web page from Cancer Australia gives an overview of soft tissue sarcomas, and where they can develop. It also provides information about risk factors, symptoms, and different aspects of the cancer experience. Follow the links below to read more on each topic, or browse our other resources on soft tissue sarcomas for more information. You can also look at our phases of the cancer journey page to find information specific to diagnosis, treatment, or life after cancer. Risk factors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Support The cells of connective tissues – such as muscles, fat, blood vessels and lining of joints Read more [...]

  •  

    Evaluating health information on the internet

    The Sydney Children’s Hospital Network has created a factsheet called Evaluating health information on the internet to help you navigate health information. It says, “It is important to evaluate the information you have found during a search on the Internet to make sure it is accurate and comes from a reliable source. When evaluating, think critically and don’t accept any information at face value.” making a bullet point list more list and more The factsheets also suggests that you ask yourself questions such : Who is responsible for the website or social media channel? Is the information accurate? Is the information Read more [...]

  •  

    How kindness can make a difference in cancer care

    The Conversation has published an article on how kindness can make a difference in cancer care. It says, “Cancer may not be life-ending, but it usually is life-changing. A cancer diagnosis instantaneously turns life upside down for patients and families. Cancer care is a “high-emotion” service, and the care team must not only effectively treat the disease but also address patients’ intense emotions.” The article explores how six types of kindness can improve cancer care. They are: deep listening, empathy, generous acts, timely care, gentle honesty and support for family caregivers. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on wellbeing, but we Read more [...]

  •  

    Adult hospitals and treatment centres in Australia

    When it comes to hospital and treatment centres, teenagers and young people facing cancer have a unique set of needs. Where a young person is treated will most likely depend on their age. If you’re a young adult, you’ll go to an adult hospital. However, teenagers can be sent to either a children’s hospital or an adult facility. What hospital you go to may also depend on where you live or even what type of cancer you have. Not all hospitals offer cancer treatment, so you may have to travel, especially if you live in a regional or rural area. Some Read more [...]

  •  

    Cancer survivor and amputee’s cute Halloween costume

    The Mighty has shared a very cute story: titled 3-Year-Old Cancer Survivor Proves You Don’t Need Two Arms to Enjoy Halloween. The article is about Scarlette, a three-year-old amputee and cancer survivor. Scarlette and her mother Simone found a fun and creative way to celebrate Halloween. Simone says, “When she was born, which was four weeks early, her left arm was gigantic … It was about three times the size of her right arm. They had no idea what to make of it.” After many tests, Scarlette was diagnosed with undifferentiated high-grade spindle cell sarcoma, a rare type of cancer. “We did a Read more [...]

  •  

    Questions to ask your doctor at diagnosis

    The Cancer Council has created a list of questions you might like to ask your doctor and treating team about your diagnosis, treatment and clinical trials. On the website it says: “When cancer is diagnosed you enter into a partnership with your doctor and other health care professionals. To help you get the best care you have the right to: ask questions be specifically informed about the details of your care make an informed choice of treatment from the options available to you It is important to ask questions, especially if you are unsure or unclear and feel you need Read more [...]

  •  

    Australian children’s cancer clinical trials registry

    The Australian and New Zealand Haemotolgy/Oncology Centre (ANZCHOG) has created a children’s cancer clinical trials registry. On the website it says: “This registry lists all clinical trials open to children and adolescents with cancer or blood disorders currently in progress at children’s cancer centres in Australia. This information should be used in conjunction with advice from health care professionals.” ANZCHOG also answers FAQs such as: What is a clinical trial? What does it mean for my child? Who should I talk to about potential clinical trials? How can I receive more information? Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on Read more [...]

  •  

    Advice on friendship during your cancer journey

    This article Cancer and your friends from Redkite offers some advice around friendship during your cancer journey. Often young people find telling their friends about their cancer diagnosis particularly difficult. Even without cancer, people and relationships change – you may find that certain friendships change and new ones may emerge. Some ways to maintain friendships during this time include: Try to be honest and open with them if you can and lean on them when you need to Warn them you may be snappy or angry at times and ask them to forgive you if needed Ask them to keep inviting you Read more [...]

  •  

    Bone tumours in children and teenagers

    Cancer Australia gives an overview of bone tumours in children and teenagers. The web page says, “Bone tumours occur when abnormal cells in the bones grow in an uncontrolled way. There are 2 main types of bone tumours in children: Osteosarcoma forms from cells called osteoblasts. It usually develops at the ends of the long bones, such as the arms or legs. Ewing sarcoma (also called Ewing family of tumours) forms from a type of stem cell in the bone marrow. It can form in the bones of the arms, legs, hands, feet, spine, skull, ribs, shoulder blades or hips. Ewing sarcomas can also Read more [...]

  • Advice for kids who have a friend with cancer

    If your child’s friend is diagnosed with cancer, you might be wondering how this could impact your child and what steps you can take to help them. We hope these resources have been helpful. If we’ve missed something, please let us know. We want to help you find what you’re looking for. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources with practical tips, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • National Carers Week 2018

    It’s National Carers Week – a time to celebrate and recognise the 2.7 million unpaid Australian carers. Carers not only contribute to our community but they make a huge impact on our national economy. In fact, according to the National Carers Week website, “Should all carers decide to stop performing their caring role, it would cost the country $60.3 billion per year to replace those supports – that’s over $1 billion per week.” National Carers Week provides a chance to show your appreciation and learn about carers and caring in Australia. You can get involved in the various events happening this week, or read Read more [...]

  • Helping a child to understand cancer

    The US website Cancer.Net offers advice to help a child understand cancer. They say: “For most parents, few things are as frightening as hearing from the doctor that your child has cancer. Parents are dealing with their own fears and confusion at this time. Yet, they must also face the task of helping their child understand his or her diagnosis.” It suggests what to tell your child based on their age and is broken up into age-appropriate sections including: aged 0-3, aged 3-7, aged 7-12, and teenagers. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for parents of children with cancer, but we Read more [...]

  • Support for grandparents of kids with cancer

    Grandparents of Kids with Cancer is a web page which offers support for grandparents around the world, giving them a place to share their experiences with other people who have a grandchild with cancer. They advocate for the important role that grandparents play in the family, and acknowledge the emotional and practical needs of grandparents. On the website they say, “Being told that your grandchild has cancer is devastating. Not only is your grandchild going through the most traumatic experience, but your own child is also facing the worst pain imaginable. Talking to other grandparents who are going through the Read more [...]

  • Coping with cancer at university

    In this article on UK news website The Guardian, Robin Cannone shares his personal experience of university as a young person with cancer. Cannone was diagnosed with a type of lymphoma, the most common cancers among 15- to 24-year-olds, representing 21% of diagnoses in the UK. I was looking through my hospital room window and imagining what I’d be doing if I hadn’t been diagnosed with cancer. I wanted to be going clubbing and worrying about university deadlines like a normal 20-year-old – not stuck indoors with a syringe in my arm. -Robin Cannone, young person with cancer Cannone acknowledges the important part that Read more [...]

  • Cancer breakthrough wins Nobel Prize

    Two immunologists have been awarded the  Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine for their groundbreaking work on cancer therapy. It is the first time the development of a cancer therapy has been recognised with a Nobel prize. James P. Allison,  chair of the department of immunology at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston,  and Tasuku Honjo, a professor in the department of immunology and genomic medicine at Kyoto University in Japan, have paved the way for a new class of cancer drugs. These drugs are already improving patient outcomes and have drastically changed scientists’ understanding of the potential of the human immune Read more [...]

  • Cancer vs VR

    US startup OnComfort is using virtual reality tools to reduce anxiety in cancer patients. Their apps have been shown to reduce stress, anxiety, and even the need for pain medication. The five apps use a variety of techniques to achieve this, you can learn more via these links: Aqua – an immersive experience that reduces pain and anxiety by inducing relaxation in an undersea environment AMO – an experience that uses clinical hypnosis techniques to ease pain and anxiety while a patient undergoes a short invasive procedure KIMO – for use in paediatrics, KIMO distracts and empowers patients by enabling them to fight Read more [...]

  • Who is who in your treating team at hospital

    If you are about to go to hospital for cancer treatment you might be wondering who is who in your treating team at hospital. Canteen has published a list of who is who in a hospital medical team. “They could be involved in: Administering treatment, Giving you information and advice. Or simply supporting you and your family during this time” The treating team includes: Medical Oncologist Radiation Oncologist Surgical Oncologist Radiologist Oncology Nurse Specialist Registered Nurse Registrar Resident/Intern It also discusses the roles of a social worker, physiotherapist, clinical psychologist and a dietitian. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on the Read more [...]

  • What to say to your friend who has just been bereaved

    This blog post on Let’s Talk About Loss discusses what to say to your friend who has just been bereaved. The author of the blog is Beth Rowland whose mother died when she was 20. However, the practical advice in this post is also relevant for people hoping to support and communicate with a bereaved parent. Beth says, “I’ve experienced my fair share of people ‘putting their foot in it’ and saying the wrong thing, so I’m going to attempt to pass on a few pearls of wisdom about what to say – and what not to say – when the Read more [...]

  • Cancer survivor creates empathy cards

    Emily McDowell has created these empathy cards for people with serious illnesses. As a cancer survivor herself, Emily understands that sometimes people don’t know what to say to someone when they are diagnosed with cancer. “The most difficult part of my illness wasn’t losing my hair, or being erroneously called ‘sir’ by Starbucks baristas, or sickness from chemo. It was the loneliness and isolation I felt when many of my close friends and family members disappeared because they didn’t know what to say, or said the absolute wrong thing without realizing it.” – Emily McDowell These quirky empathy cards will Read more [...]

  • Supporting sleep in young cancer patients

    Sleeping difficulties are common among children and adolescents, and cancer patients are no exception. In fact, children with cancer are especially susceptible to difficult sleep and need particular support to get the rest needed for health and recovery. Why Sleep is Difficult for Young People With Cancer Whether in a hospital setting or undergoing treatment at home, young people with cancer may experience disturbed sleep due to environmental conditions, side effects, and schedules. In a hospital setting, young cancer patients may be disturbed by environmental conditions, including sounds and lights throughout the night (and daytime, if napping). Disruptions from medical Read more [...]