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    Ependymoma: Key links

    According to Cancer Australia, ependymomas develop from ependymal cells. Ependymomas are given different names, depending on where they occur in the brain. They can spread to other parts of the central nervous system. General information  Childhood ependymoma treatment (PDQ®) – Patient version – National Cancer Institute: Information on what ependymoma is, staging and treatment options. Gliomas in children – Cancer Research UK: Information on the three main types of glioma including ependymoma. FAQs about ependymoma: Collaborative Ependymoma Research Network: Information about ependymoma classification and treatment. Ependymoma – Child – Rare Cancers Australia: Overview of the different types of ependymoma, diagnosis and Read more [...]

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    Retinoblastoma: Key links

    According to Cancer Australia, retinoblastoma occurs when abnormal cells in the retina (the light-sensing area at the back of the eye) grow in an uncontrolled way. It usually occurs in young children, and can affect one or both eyes. Cancer Research UK says retinoblastoma is a rare cancer that usually affects children under five. General information Retinoblastoma treatment (PDQ®) – Patient version – National Cancer Institute: Information on staging and treatment options. What is retinoblastoma? – American Cancer Society: Overview and information on diagnosis and treatment. Retinoblastoma – Children’s Cancer Centre: Short overview of retinoblastoma. Retinoblastoma cancer – Rare Cancers Australia: Read more [...]

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    Neuroblastoma: Key links

    According to CanTeen, neuroblastoma is the most common type of solid tumour in children. It is normally found in the adrenal glands of the kidney, but can develop in the nerve tissues of the neck, chest, abdomen or pelvis. Cancer Research UK says neuroblastoma is a rare cancer that usually affects children under five. General information  Living with neuroblastoma – Practical information for during treatment – Neuroblastoma Australia: Advice and tips drawn from the experiences of families. Neuroblastoma staging – Cancer Australia: A factsheet on staging, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and support.  Podcasts  Neuroblastoma – Dr Geoff McCowage: Podcast about diagnosis and Read more [...]

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    Non-hodgkin lymphoma: Key links

    According to Cancer Australia, hon-hodgkin lymphoma occurs when certain types of white blood cells called lymphocytes grow in an uncontrolled way. There are three main types: lymphoblastic lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma and large cell lymphoma. It occurs more often in older children than in younger children. General information Non-hodgkin lymphoma – The Leukaemia Foundation: Information about what non-hodgkin lymphoma is, its sub types and occurrence. Childhood non-hodgkin lymphoma treatment (PDQ®) – Patient version – National Cancer Institute: Information about the types of non-hodgkin lymphoma, diagnosis and staging. Non-hodgkin lymphoma – CanTeen: Information on possible causes, symptoms and diagnosis.        Podcasts  Hodgkin and Read more [...]

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    Hodgkin lymphoma: Key links

    According to Cancer Australia, Hodgkin lymphoma, also known as Hodgkin disease, occurs when certain types of white blood cells called lymphocytes grow in an uncontrolled way. CanTeen explains that Hodgkin lymphoma can occur at any age but is more common in people in their 20s. General information Hodgkin lymphoma – Cancer Research UK: Information on what Hodgkin lymphoma is, diagnosis, treatment and survival. Hodgkin lymphoma – The Leukaemia Foundation: Information about what Hodgkin lymphoma is, its sub types and occurrence. Hodgkin lymphoma – A guide for patients and families ­– The Leukaemia Foundation: Information booklet covering topics including symptoms, treatment, Read more [...]

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    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML): Key links

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a type of cancer affecting the blood and bone marrow. According to The Leukaemia Foundation, around 330 people are diagnosed with CML each year and it has three phases: the chronic phase, accelerated phase and blast phase. General information  Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia – CanTeen: Information on causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) – The Leukaemia Foundation: Information on what CML is, its phases and symptoms. Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia – A guide for patients and families – The Leukaemia Foundation: An information book on CML including prognosis, treatment and managing side-effects. Podcasts  Understanding Chronic Read more [...]

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    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML): Key links

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a rare cancer that affects the blood and bone marrow. According to The Leukaemia Foundation, around 50 children are diagnosed with AML each year. General information  Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) – Cancer Research UK: Information on the symptoms, types and causes of AML along with diagnosis and treatment. Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) – The Leukaemia Foundation: Overview of diagnosis, treatment and possible side effects. Acute myeloid leukaemia – Australian Cancer Research Foundation: Information on AML symptoms, treatment and statistics. Acute myeloid leukaemia – CanTeen: Overview of AML causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment.  Treatment  Treatment of acute Read more [...]

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    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL): Key links

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common type of leukemia in children, occurring mostly in younger children (aged 2–4 years). It is named after the lymphoid stem cells it affects. Cancer Australia explains that leukaemia is a type of cancer of the blood and bone marrow. It occurs when the bone marrow makes too many white blood cells, which are part of the body’s immune system to fight infections. According to The Leukaemia Foundation, around 180 children are diagnosed with ALL each year. Almost all will achieve remission and most will be cured. General information  Children and Blood Cancer Read more [...]

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    Statistics and information about childhood cancers

    Researchers can’t tackle childhood cancer without a set of current, accurate, nationally consistent data – and that’s exactly what the Australian Children’s Cancer Registry provides. The ACCR is managed by Cancer Council Queensland with the assistance of all state and territory cancer registries and all treating paediatric oncology hospitals. It comprises more than 20,000 cases of childhood cancer diagnosed in Australia since 1983. While the statistics and information developed by the ACCR are of great benefit to clinicians and other researchers, they’re also freely available to anyone with an interest or involvement in childhood cancers including families of paediatric cancer patients. Read more [...]

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    Germs, genetics and childhood leukaemia

    Mel Greaves received a knighthood late last year for his research into why children develop leukaemia. In this article from The Guardian, he explains how it’s now understood that a combination of genetic mutations in the womb, and chronic inflammation in response to infection, can lead to leukaemia developing. Greaves is currently working on a ‘cocktail of microbes’ that could block the inflammation response, potentially reducing the risk of leukaemia and other diseases.