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    Medulloblastoma: Key links

    According to Cancer Australia, medulloablastomas develop from a type of nerve cell in the cerebellum (the area at the back of the brain that controls movement and coordination). They tend to be aggressive tumours and often spread to other parts of the brain or spinal cord. General information  Medulloblastoma – Information, Treatment & Support – CanTeen: Brief overview of what a medulloblastoma is, diagnosis and treatment. Medulloblastoma – National Cancer Institute: Overview of occurrence, diagnosis and treatment. Medulloblastoma – Children’s Cancer Centre: Overview of diagnosis and treatment.  Podcasts  Medulloblastoma – Dr Geoff McCowage: Podcast about investigations and treatment.  Medulloblastoma stories  Read more [...]

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    Ependymoma: Key links

    According to Cancer Australia, ependymomas develop from ependymal cells. Ependymomas are given different names, depending on where they occur in the brain. They can spread to other parts of the central nervous system. General information  Childhood ependymoma treatment (PDQ®) – Patient version – National Cancer Institute: Information on what ependymoma is, staging and treatment options. Gliomas in children – Cancer Research UK: Information on the three main types of glioma including ependymoma. FAQs about ependymoma: Collaborative Ependymoma Research Network: Information about ependymoma classification and treatment. Ependymoma – Child – Rare Cancers Australia: Overview of the different types of ependymoma, diagnosis and Read more [...]

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    Retinoblastoma: Key links

    According to Cancer Australia, retinoblastoma occurs when abnormal cells in the retina (the light-sensing area at the back of the eye) grow in an uncontrolled way. It usually occurs in young children, and can affect one or both eyes. Cancer Research UK says retinoblastoma is a rare cancer that usually affects children under five. General information Retinoblastoma treatment (PDQ®) – Patient version – National Cancer Institute: Information on staging and treatment options. What is retinoblastoma? – American Cancer Society: Overview and information on diagnosis and treatment. Retinoblastoma – Children’s Cancer Centre: Short overview of retinoblastoma. Retinoblastoma cancer – Rare Cancers Australia: Read more [...]

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    Neuroblastoma: Key links

    According to CanTeen, neuroblastoma is the most common type of solid tumour in children. It is normally found in the adrenal glands of the kidney, but can develop in the nerve tissues of the neck, chest, abdomen or pelvis. Cancer Research UK says neuroblastoma is a rare cancer that usually affects children under five. General information  Living with neuroblastoma – Practical information for during treatment – Neuroblastoma Australia: Advice and tips drawn from the experiences of families. Neuroblastoma staging – Cancer Australia: A factsheet on staging, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and support.  Podcasts  Neuroblastoma – Dr Geoff McCowage: Podcast about diagnosis and Read more [...]

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    Non-hodgkin lymphoma: Key links

    According to Cancer Australia, hon-hodgkin lymphoma occurs when certain types of white blood cells called lymphocytes grow in an uncontrolled way. There are three main types: lymphoblastic lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma and large cell lymphoma. It occurs more often in older children than in younger children. General information Non-hodgkin lymphoma – The Leukaemia Foundation: Information about what non-hodgkin lymphoma is, its sub types and occurrence. Childhood non-hodgkin lymphoma treatment (PDQ®) – Patient version – National Cancer Institute: Information about the types of non-hodgkin lymphoma, diagnosis and staging. Non-hodgkin lymphoma – CanTeen: Information on possible causes, symptoms and diagnosis.        Podcasts  Hodgkin and Read more [...]

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    Hodgkin lymphoma: Key links

    According to Cancer Australia, Hodgkin lymphoma, also known as Hodgkin disease, occurs when certain types of white blood cells called lymphocytes grow in an uncontrolled way. CanTeen explains that Hodgkin lymphoma can occur at any age but is more common in people in their 20s. General information Hodgkin lymphoma – Cancer Research UK: Information on what Hodgkin lymphoma is, diagnosis, treatment and survival. Hodgkin lymphoma – The Leukaemia Foundation: Information about what Hodgkin lymphoma is, its sub types and occurrence. Hodgkin lymphoma – A guide for patients and families ­– The Leukaemia Foundation: Information booklet covering topics including symptoms, treatment, Read more [...]

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    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML): Key links

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a type of cancer affecting the blood and bone marrow. According to The Leukaemia Foundation, around 330 people are diagnosed with CML each year and it has three phases: the chronic phase, accelerated phase and blast phase. General information  Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia – CanTeen: Information on causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) – The Leukaemia Foundation: Information on what CML is, its phases and symptoms. Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia – A guide for patients and families – The Leukaemia Foundation: An information book on CML including prognosis, treatment and managing side-effects. Podcasts  Understanding Chronic Read more [...]

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    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML): Key links

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a rare cancer that affects the blood and bone marrow. According to The Leukaemia Foundation, around 50 children are diagnosed with AML each year. General information  Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) – Cancer Research UK: Information on the symptoms, types and causes of AML along with diagnosis and treatment. Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) – The Leukaemia Foundation: Overview of diagnosis, treatment and possible side effects. Acute myeloid leukaemia – Australian Cancer Research Foundation: Information on AML symptoms, treatment and statistics. Acute myeloid leukaemia – CanTeen: Overview of AML causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment.  Treatment  Treatment of acute Read more [...]

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    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL): Key links

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common type of leukemia in children, occurring mostly in younger children (aged 2–4 years). It is named after the lymphoid stem cells it affects. Cancer Australia explains that leukaemia is a type of cancer of the blood and bone marrow. It occurs when the bone marrow makes too many white blood cells, which are part of the body’s immune system to fight infections. According to The Leukaemia Foundation, around 180 children are diagnosed with ALL each year. Almost all will achieve remission and most will be cured. General information  Children and Blood Cancer Read more [...]

  • Leaving hospital

    When a child or young person finishes cancer treatment it can be a time of mixed emotions. Often this is a long anticipated event, and when it feels like they should be happy and celebrating, families may also feel anxious and overwhelmed. Leaving hospital and going home will be a different experience for each person, but Cancer Advisor has some resources on finishing treatment that may be useful. “Leaving hospital can be a scary time for a lot of families. They talk about leaving the safety net of the hospital, leaving their oncology family. Often losing this close support is the Read more [...]

  • Transport and accommodation assistance NSW

    The Isolated Patients Travel and Accommodation Assistance Scheme (IPTAAS) is a NSW Government initiative.  Designed to help isolated patients, IPTAAS offer financial assistance towards transport and accommodation costs.  This is for patients who need to travel long distances for specialist medical treatment that is not available locally. To be eligible to claim through IPTAAS you must meet the following criteria: Be a resident of NSW or Lord Howe Island Hold a Medicare card Live more than 100km from the nearest treating specialist or your combined trips to and from the specialist exceeds 200km/week Specialist treatment not available locally Ineligible for any other Read more [...]

  • Bereavement and grief

    Bereavement is the loss of someone through death, and grief is our response to loss. The grief that follows a young person’s death lasts a lifetime, and losing a child to cancer is one of the most devastating things that can happen to any family. When your child dies is a booklet from Redkite that uses the real experiences of bereaved parents to help other parents and carers following the death of their child.  It is important to remember that grief is personal and unique – everybody grieves differently and that’s okay. There will be a number of different factors that will Read more [...]

  • For teachers: Cancer in the school community

    This booklet from Camp Quality offers tips for supporting children facing cancer in the school environment. This may include children with cancer, siblings of children with cancer, or children who have a parent with cancer. For any school experiencing cancer, it is important that teachers and support staff are equipped to educate the children about cancer and answer any difficult questions. Common questions from classmates include: How did they get sick? Can I catch it? Should I share things that are bothering me? They seem silly or trivial compared to what my friend is going through. What am I supposed Read more [...]

  • Bald Cartoons – free posters and profile pics

    Bald Cartoons is a Brazilian website featuring a range of famous cartoon characters with their heads shaved to help children with cancer not feel ‘different’. The website and heartwarming video below was created by cancer advocacy group GRAACC. The video shows the reactions of children when they see bald characters including Garfield, Hello Kitty and Snoopy. The website also allows families to print out posters or download social media profile pics. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on wellbeing, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Cancer information for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

    The Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council Cancer Council NSW has created cancer information resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. One of the resources is Aboriginal cancer journeys: Our stories of kinship, hope and survival is a factsheet and a booklet of stories from Indigenous people affected by cancer. The PDF was created with funding provided by Cancer Australia, the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW and Cancer Council NSW. This page also links to the Aboriginal Cancer Council website with information about cancer, treatment, support and research. It includes information for the community and health workers Read more [...]

  • Living without your child: for parents and carers

    Living without your child is a nine-page booklet written using the real experiences of bereaved parents about life after your child dies. It was adapted from CLIC Sargent by Redkite. This booklet is a part of a series which also includes When your child isn’t going to get better and When your child dies. The booklet has sections including: Understanding your grief Dealing with other people Supporting your other children Family and friends Your child’s personal belongings Your child’s room Will I ever be happy again? Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on end of life, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a Read more [...]

  • Understanding palliative care for people with cancer

    The Cancer Council and Palliative Care Australia have created a 56-page online PDF called Understanding Palliative Care, a guide for people with cancer, their friends and family. It including types of treatment and how to seek support if needed. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on end of life, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Cancer – WTF? (Want the facts?)

    UK cancer charity CLIC Sargent has developed this information booklet called Cancer – Want the Facts? This booklet offers guidance and advice for teenagers and young adults who have just been given a cancer diagnosis. Please note, some information will be targeted at a UK audience. Hearing you have cancer throws you into a world of “unknowns”. It’s like finding yourself in the middle of a maze with no clue how you’re supposed to find your way back out again. It’s confusing and scary when you don’t know which way to turn. But that’s where we all step in – your loved Read more [...]