• Leaving hospital

    When a child or young person finishes cancer treatment it can be a time of mixed emotions. Often this is a long anticipated event, and when it feels like they should be happy and celebrating, families may also feel anxious and overwhelmed. Leaving hospital and going home will be a different experience for each person, but Cancer Advisor has some resources on finishing treatment that may be useful. “Leaving hospital can be a scary time for a lot of families. They talk about leaving the safety net of the hospital, leaving their oncology family. Often losing this close support is the Read more [...]

  • Transport and accommodation assistance NSW

    The Isolated Patients Travel and Accommodation Assistance Scheme (IPTAAS) is a NSW Government initiative.  Designed to help isolated patients, IPTAAS offer financial assistance towards transport and accommodation costs.  This is for patients who need to travel long distances for specialist medical treatment that is not available locally. To be eligible to claim through IPTAAS you must meet the following criteria: Be a resident of NSW or Lord Howe Island Hold a Medicare card Live more than 100km from the nearest treating specialist or your combined trips to and from the specialist exceeds 200km/week Specialist treatment not available locally Ineligible for any other Read more [...]

  • Bereavement and grief

    Bereavement is the loss of someone through death, and grief is our response to loss. The grief that follows a young person’s death lasts a lifetime, and losing a child to cancer is one of the most devastating things that can happen to any family. When your child dies is a booklet from Redkite that uses the real experiences of bereaved parents to help other parents and carers following the death of their child.  It is important to remember that grief is personal and unique – everybody grieves differently and that’s okay. There will be a number of different factors that will Read more [...]

  • For teachers: Cancer in the school community

    This booklet from Camp Quality offers tips for supporting children facing cancer in the school environment. This may include children with cancer, siblings of children with cancer, or children who have a parent with cancer. For any school experiencing cancer, it is important that teachers and support staff are equipped to educate the children about cancer and answer any difficult questions. Common questions from classmates include: How did they get sick? Can I catch it? Should I share things that are bothering me? They seem silly or trivial compared to what my friend is going through. What am I supposed Read more [...]

  • Bald Cartoons – free posters and profile pics

    Bald Cartoons is a Brazilian website featuring a range of famous cartoon characters with their heads shaved to help children with cancer not feel ‘different’. The website and heartwarming video below was created by cancer advocacy group GRAACC. The video shows the reactions of children when they see bald characters including Garfield, Hello Kitty and Snoopy. The website also allows families to print out posters or download social media profile pics. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on wellbeing, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Cancer information for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

    The Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council Cancer Council NSW has created cancer information resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. One of the resources is Aboriginal cancer journeys: Our stories of kinship, hope and survival is a factsheet and a booklet of stories from Indigenous people affected by cancer. The PDF was created with funding provided by Cancer Australia, the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW and Cancer Council NSW. This page also links to the Aboriginal Cancer Council website with information about cancer, treatment, support and research. It includes information for the community and health workers Read more [...]

  • Living without your child: for parents and carers

    Living without your child is a nine-page booklet written using the real experiences of bereaved parents about life after your child dies. It was adapted from CLIC Sargent by Redkite. This booklet is a part of a series which also includes When your child isn’t going to get better and When your child dies. The booklet has sections including: Understanding your grief Dealing with other people Supporting your other children Family and friends Your child’s personal belongings Your child’s room Will I ever be happy again? Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on end of life, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a Read more [...]

  • Understanding palliative care for people with cancer

    The Cancer Council and Palliative Care Australia have created a 56-page online PDF called Understanding Palliative Care, a guide for people with cancer, their friends and family. It including types of treatment and how to seek support if needed. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on end of life, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Cancer – WTF? (Want the facts?)

    UK cancer charity CLIC Sargent has developed this information booklet called Cancer – Want the Facts? This booklet offers guidance and advice for teenagers and young adults who have just been given a cancer diagnosis. Please note, some information will be targeted at a UK audience. Hearing you have cancer throws you into a world of “unknowns”. It’s like finding yourself in the middle of a maze with no clue how you’re supposed to find your way back out again. It’s confusing and scary when you don’t know which way to turn. But that’s where we all step in – your loved Read more [...]

  • Educating teachers about brain injury

    Educating Educators about Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) is produced by Brock University and the Ontario Brain Injury Association (Canada). Many children who have brain tumors will suffer from acquired brain injuries and will need intervention with education. This resource has excellent practical information on brain injury for teachers and parents, as well as strategies for teaching children with brain injury in the classroom. It is available free online in PDF format. For more information, Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on brain injury and brain tumours. Before you go … Please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing Read more [...]

  • 8 resources for when your child goes back to school after treatment

    If your child has finished their cancer treatment, you might be wondering how they will transition back into full time study. Your child may be looking forward to the social aspect of school … although, they may be nervous too.  Perhaps you’re keen for a new sense of routine, and school seems like a good way to add some structure post-treatment.  You might also be wondering what information or support your child’s teacher will need. Here are some helpful resources if your child is about to start back at school, or just needs some extra support adjusting. 1  A teacher’s Read more [...]

  • Helping your child to eat during cancer treatment

    Helping your child to eat during cancer treatment is an accessible 15-page PDF. This online resource was developed by the UK Children’s Cancer and Leukaemia Group and offers practical advice and tips on how your child’s treatment may affect their diet and what you can do about it. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on nutrition. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • Understanding complementary therapies

    Understanding complementary therapies is an 88-page online booklet developed by the Cancer Council. Cancer Council (and Cancer Advisor) only support complementary therapies which have been found safe and effective in scientific studies. This booklet explores therapies such as meditation and relaxation, support groups, art therapy, music therapy, aromatherapy, acupuncture and yoga. It also looks at how these therapies can be used alongside your standard treatment for cancer. Always speak with your treating team if you are planning on taking any treatment or therapies outside of your standard treatment for cancer. Have you had any experience with complementary therapies? Let us know in the comments Read more [...]

  • Free eBook for teenage and young adult cancer survivors

    Aftercure: A guide for teenage and young adult survivors of childhood cancer is 28-page booklet by the UK Children’s Cancer and Leukaemia Group. The eBook is aimed at young people who had treatment as a child. Topics include follow up and future care, education and jobs, travel and vaccination, and fertility and sexual function. Note: some themes explored in this booklet will be specific to a UK audience. Published: March 2017 Next Review: 2020 Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Read more [...]

  • Brain tumours: It’s ok to ask

    Brain tumours: It’s Okay to Ask features a range of questions you may want to ask your doctors or other health staff. While it was written with all ages in mind, you might find it useful in regards to childhood and young adult cancer. This a 36-page online booklet was created by Queensland University of Technology. It was written with the help of brain tumour survivors and their families, and doctors and nurses. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community Read more [...]

  • Cancer Council: Cancer in the school community

    Cancer in the School Community is a guide for school staff who would like to support students, families and colleagues affected by cancer. This 80-page eBook was first developed in 2008 by the Cancer Council but is now in its 2015 edition. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • 7 resources for relationship wellbeing for young people

    ­­Valentine’s Day is almost here, which means it’s hard to escape the roses and hearts all over social media, and shop windows. If you’re dealing with cancer right now, romance may not be top of your agenda. However, love and sex are important parts of life, and there are ways to keep the spark alive through tough times. Whether you’re a young adult thinking about starting a sexual relationship or a teenager whose partner has a diagnosis, we’ve found a range of resources to help keep your intimate and romantic relationships in good shape. 1 Title: A Guide to Supporting Read more [...]

  • Exercise for people living with cancer (Part 1)

    Cancer Council booklet for exercise for people living with cancer. Note: This booklet does not provide specific advice for your situation. Always speak with your treating team about the best program for you. Cancer Advisor also has found a range of  resources on exercise. Psst … before you go If you haven’t already make sure to register. That way you can comment, give a ‘thumbs up’ to material you like, and submit your own content. Best of all, you’ll receive information tailored to your specific needs and preferences such as particular cancer type and age group. And you’ll receive regular notifications Read more [...]

  • Children’s Oncology Group Family Handbook

    Children’s Oncology Group Family Handbook is a detailed 165-page booklet for families with a cancer diagnosis. It covers different types of childhood cancer, treatment and more. Note: the Children’s Oncology Group is a U.S resource and is a second edition published after 2011. Cancer Advisor has found a range of resources on cancer diagnosis. Psst … before you go If you haven’t already make sure to register. That way you can comment, give a ‘thumbs up’ to material you like, and submit your own content. Best of all, you’ll receive information tailored to your specific needs and preferences such as particular cancer type Read more [...]

  • Paediatric Information Cancer – Life after diagnosis

    The Paediatric Information Cancer Service (PICS) has created a booklet called Life After Diagnosis. This 175-page read contains information about childhood cancers, tests and available treatments. It also offer insight on caring for your child and your family. Cancer Advisor has found a range of resources on cancer diagnosis. Psst … before you go If you haven’t already make sure to register. That way you can comment, give a ‘thumbs up’ to material you like, and submit your own content. Best of all, you’ll receive information tailored to your specific needs and preferences such as particular cancer type and age group. Read more [...]