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Cancer Advisor
July 31, 2019
Displaying 1 - 20 of 200
  • Grief, Loss and Bereavement

    “It is the peculiar nature of the world to go on spinning no matter what sort of heartbreak is happening”, (Sue Monikkid) – but in these changing times of COVID-19, the world has strangely stopped in some ways. During this pandemic, the devastation, sadness and isolation is shared globally, and we all ‘get it’ and can understand the impact. But when it comes to bereavement, sadly many people and communities don’t understand. Grief can be described as a deep and intense sorrow and as tough as it can be it is a natural reaction which helps us work through the […]

  • ‘Chin up’: Breaking down the barriers between men and support

    Most men would be familiar with phrases such as ‘act like a man’ and ‘grow some …’. But what do these phrases say about how a man should behave when his child is diagnosed with cancer? Men are encouraged to show strength and it might seem you can’t say you’re struggling and keep your man badge. So it’s a good thing men don’t need support… right? There’s been a lot of debate about whether our emotions are determined by our biological sex but our feelings don’t depend on our gender. From a very early age, our brains are storing what […]

  • Can Centrelink help my family?

      We understand that families are under high amounts of pressure and stress during the course of their child’s treatment and beyond. Understanding and navigating Centrelink is difficult and confusing. Here we’re highlighting a few tips about Centrelink and other options that may be relevant to you and your family.  Tips for accessing Centrelink services and payments   Speak to a Social Worker at your Centrelink office Social Workers can help with your application and direct you to the most appropriate payment depending on your situation. Centrelink Social Workers can also assist you with information, short term counselling, referrals to […]

  • Motivation

    What is motivation? Where does motivation come from, and how do we find it? We all kind of know what it is, but often it just seems like something that is missing. Some people seem so full of motivation and energy, but for most of us, it’s common to feel like motivation is hard to find, and even harder to hang on to, especially when it comes to tasks we find tedious, time consuming or not very high on our list of priorities. So when we’re going through a difficult time, such as the frightening experience of your child receiving […]

  • Family Tensions in COVID-19

      The COVID-19 pandemic has had significant impacts on us all. It’s brought many unexpected stressors that can affect our lives in different ways. Relationships with those close to us can be especially impacted so it’s important to recognise the ways our families are being affected by the additional stress everyone is experiencing right now.   The roles we play  We have a role when we go to work, whether it’s as a team leader, a professional or the calm face of an organisation. Then when we come home, we have a different role, like a caregiver or partner. As […]

  • Homeschool – Your Rules

        Homeschooling: it may seem like an odd topic to cover when all you can think about is your child getting through treatment and being okay; when the most important thing right now is avoiding coronavirus – or any virus or infection for that matter. We understand that getting through treatment is a family’s number one priority.  We hear that homeschooling is an added stress that comes up, particularly now with COVID-19. This article covers some ways parents can consider their homeschooling approaches through cancer treatment, and through COVID-19 and beyond. Working with your values about learning Before you […]

  • Isolation and Social Connectedness

      Isolation is one of the big changes almost everyone is experiencing in their lives right now. In times of stress, being disconnected from others can be particularly hard. COVID-19 is likely to keep influencing our lives in the coming months, so it’s important to make sure we’re looking after ourselves. Humans are social beings. Evidence shows that loneliness and isolation aren’t good for our health. Even if we’re naturally introverted, connecting with others is an important part of looking after our wellbeing.   What is social connectedness? ‘Social distancing’ isn’t the right term for what we need right now. […]

  • Ben’s story: ‘Cancer has taught me a lot’

    Diagnosis & treatment After having a sore on his neck for a few weeks Ben decided to make an appointment with his local GP in Perth. Although Ben was more preoccupied about the sore, after hearing about Ben’s history of headaches the doctor insisted on getting tests done. A few weeks later, the 23-year-old was told he had a benign brain tumour and needed surgery. However, after testing the biopsy the tumour turned out to be a malignant four centimetre mass. It was classified as stage 2 with characteristics of stage 3 astrocytoma glioma. The mass was on the right […]

  • Cognitive difficulties after brain cancer

    The Conversation outlines the ways that cancer in a child’s brain has the potential to impact their overall future health and cause long-term disturbances to the central nervous system of survivors.intro Known as ‘late effects’, these cognition and communication difficulties can affect personal and social development. Early intervention can lessen the impact of such difficulties on survivors.   Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on brain cancer and late effects, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.  

  • Danielle’s story: One day at a time

    They say that our first love will stay in our hearts forever. This couldn’t be more true for 26-year Danielle Paparone. At 19 she was swept off her feet by an affable young man with striking blue eyes. After a blissful year together, he was diagnosed with a brain tumour. However, treatment was unsuccessful, and he died three years after diagnosis. Danielle shares her incredible love story with Cancer Advisor and tells us how she turns her pain into purpose. “He had very big blue eyes and that’s what drew me in,” Danielle says. Jake first laid his big blue […]

  • “How bravery beads help us” – Nic and Izzy’s story

    On Cancer Advisor, Nic shares why her daughter, Izzy, uses bravery beads. Mothers Day 2018 will be a day that I will never forget. My 12-year-old daughter was diagnosed with AML – Acute Myeloid Leukaemia. We were admitted to Westmead Children’s Hospital and a few days later a beautiful French speaking Lady, Anne, came into our room. She gave Izzy the choice of a cloth bag and then presented her with what would become her journey of beads. The journey would start with some coloured beads, her name and a love heart. At the time it did not seem like […]

  • Adult hospitals and treatment centres in Australia

    When it comes to hospital and treatment centres, teenagers and young people facing cancer have a unique set of needs. Where a young person is treated will most likely depend on their age. If you’re a young adult, you’ll go to an adult hospital. However, teenagers can be sent to either a children’s hospital or an adult facility. What hospital you go to may also depend on where you live or even what type of cancer you have. Not all hospitals offer cancer treatment, so you may have to travel, especially if you live in a regional or rural area. Some […]

  • Navigating finances – using insurance during cancer

    If you’re facing cancer, navigating insurance entitlements might not be on your radar. We’ve found some resources that could help you understand the various insurance entitlements out there and how you can access them. Have we missed something? If there is a finance question you need answered, please don’t hesitate to let us know and we will do what we can to answer it for you. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on finances and cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Cancer survivor and amputee’s cute Halloween costume

    The Mighty has shared a very cute story: titled 3-Year-Old Cancer Survivor Proves You Don’t Need Two Arms to Enjoy Halloween. The article is about Scarlette, a three-year-old amputee and cancer survivor. Scarlette and her mother Simone found a fun and creative way to celebrate Halloween. Simone says, “When she was born, which was four weeks early, her left arm was gigantic … It was about three times the size of her right arm. They had no idea what to make of it.” After many tests, Scarlette was diagnosed with undifferentiated high-grade spindle cell sarcoma, a rare type of cancer. “We did a […]

  • Tosh’s story: how he helped end his daughter’s cancer

    After more than two years of chemotherapy, Tosh Nagashima helped end his daughter’s cancer. Cancer Advisor called him to talk about his family’s experience. In March 2014 four-year-old Bella was diagnosed with high-risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL). After arriving at the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne in an ambulance, Bella started chemotherapy immediately. During treatment, Bella’s father continued to work full-time and take care of their youngest daughter Olivia while his wife Vanie spent day and night in the hospital. “After work I would visit Bella in the hospital every day,” he explains. “It was hard for her younger sister […]

  • Advice on friendship during your cancer journey

    This article Cancer and your friends from Redkite offers some advice around friendship during your cancer journey. Often young people find telling their friends about their cancer diagnosis particularly difficult. Even without cancer, people and relationships change – you may find that certain friendships change and new ones may emerge. Some ways to maintain friendships during this time include: Try to be honest and open with them if you can and lean on them when you need to Warn them you may be snappy or angry at times and ask them to forgive you if needed Ask them to keep inviting you […]

  • Advice for kids who have a friend with cancer

    If your child’s friend is diagnosed with cancer, you might be wondering how this could impact your child and what steps you can take to help them. We hope these resources have been helpful. If we’ve missed something, please let us know. We want to help you find what you’re looking for. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources with practical tips, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Angus’ story: Being a transgender childhood cancer survivor

    On the New Zealand website, Stuff, a transgender cancer survivor shares his story of his upcoming mastectomy. Angus Coleman was diagnosed with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) at just 16 months old. LCH is a rare type of cancer that can damage tissue or cause lesions to form in one or more places in the body. During his time with cancer, Angus had ongoing treatment from an endocrinologist which is now helping him take his next steps in his gender transition. “I was actually set up with an endocrinologist back when I was diagnosed with langerhans cell histiocytosis  [rare cancer]which is actually the doctor you need […]

  • Cancer survivor creates empathy cards

    Emily McDowell has created these empathy cards for people with serious illnesses. As a cancer survivor herself, Emily understands that sometimes people don’t know what to say to someone when they are diagnosed with cancer. “The most difficult part of my illness wasn’t losing my hair, or being erroneously called ‘sir’ by Starbucks baristas, or sickness from chemo. It was the loneliness and isolation I felt when many of my close friends and family members disappeared because they didn’t know what to say, or said the absolute wrong thing without realizing it.” – Emily McDowell These quirky empathy cards will […]

  • Children’s hospitals in Australia

    Children’s hospitals (also known as paediatric hospitals) specialise in the medical needs of children and teenagers. At children’s hospital the staff are specifically trained in taking care of children and teenagers. Chances are there will also be more child-geared activities on hand such as kids films and child entertainers. Expand the boxes below to learn more about children’s hospitals in each state. Some children’s hospitals do not treat children’s cancer, so you may need to move to a different state for treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for families who need to do this, including personal stories from […]

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