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Cancer Advisor
July 31, 2019
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  • Statistics and information about childhood cancers

    Researchers can’t tackle childhood cancer without a set of current, accurate, nationally consistent data – and that’s exactly what the Australian Children’s Cancer Registry provides. The ACCR is managed by Cancer Council Queensland with the assistance of all state and territory cancer registries and all treating paediatric oncology hospitals. It comprises more than 20,000 cases of childhood cancer diagnosed in Australia since 1983. While the statistics and information developed by the ACCR are of great benefit to clinicians and other researchers, they’re also freely available to anyone with an interest or involvement in childhood cancers including families of paediatric cancer patients. […]

  • Cognitive difficulties after brain cancer

    The Conversation outlines the ways that cancer in a child’s brain has the potential to impact their overall future health and cause long-term disturbances to the central nervous system of survivors.intro Known as ‘late effects’, these cognition and communication difficulties can affect personal and social development. Early intervention can lessen the impact of such difficulties on survivors.   Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on brain cancer and late effects, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.  

  • Cancer survivor and amputee’s cute Halloween costume

    The Mighty has shared a very cute story: titled 3-Year-Old Cancer Survivor Proves You Don’t Need Two Arms to Enjoy Halloween. The article is about Scarlette, a three-year-old amputee and cancer survivor. Scarlette and her mother Simone found a fun and creative way to celebrate Halloween. Simone says, “When she was born, which was four weeks early, her left arm was gigantic … It was about three times the size of her right arm. They had no idea what to make of it.” After many tests, Scarlette was diagnosed with undifferentiated high-grade spindle cell sarcoma, a rare type of cancer. “We did a […]

  • Tosh’s story: how he helped end his daughter’s cancer

    After more than two years of chemotherapy, Tosh Nagashima helped end his daughter’s cancer. Cancer Advisor called him to talk about his family’s experience. In March 2014 four-year-old Bella was diagnosed with high-risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL). After arriving at the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne in an ambulance, Bella started chemotherapy immediately. During treatment, Bella’s father continued to work full-time and take care of their youngest daughter Olivia while his wife Vanie spent day and night in the hospital. “After work I would visit Bella in the hospital every day,” he explains. “It was hard for her younger sister […]

  • Advice for kids who have a friend with cancer

    If your child’s friend is diagnosed with cancer, you might be wondering how this could impact your child and what steps you can take to help them. We hope these resources have been helpful. If we’ve missed something, please let us know. We want to help you find what you’re looking for. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources with practical tips, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Support for grandparents of kids with cancer

    Grandparents of Kids with Cancer is a web page which offers support for grandparents around the world, giving them a place to share their experiences with other people who have a grandchild with cancer. They advocate for the important role that grandparents play in the family, and acknowledge the emotional and practical needs of grandparents. On the website they say, “Being told that your grandchild has cancer is devastating. Not only is your grandchild going through the most traumatic experience, but your own child is also facing the worst pain imaginable. Talking to other grandparents who are going through the […]

  • Children’s hospitals in Australia

    Children’s hospitals (also known as paediatric hospitals) specialise in the medical needs of children and teenagers. At children’s hospital the staff are specifically trained in taking care of children and teenagers. Chances are there will also be more child-geared activities on hand such as kids films and child entertainers. Expand the boxes below to learn more about children’s hospitals in each state. Some children’s hospitals do not treat children’s cancer, so you may need to move to a different state for treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for families who need to do this, including personal stories from […]

  • Nerida’s story: Turning Brisbane gold for kids with cancer

    The 1st of September is our D-Day anniversary, so this year I decided to channel my energy into something positive. I turned Brisbane Gold. Brisbane City Hall, The Story Bridge and Victoria Bridge all shone gold for Childhood Cancer Awareness. This is how it happened: Receiving a diagnosis On the 1st September 2015 my Son Xavier was diagnosed with Stage III Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma of the bladder at just 23 months of age. We had to move to Brisbane from Townsville for treatment and as I knew very few people here, I started a Facebook support group page for the oncology […]

  • Nutrition tips for children during cancer treatment

    You’re probably aware that nutrition plays a huge part in a child’s overall health and wellbeing at any stage of their lives. However, did you know that nutrition may also help your child to better tolerate their cancer treatment, fight infection and assist with their recovery? Here’s what the experts have to say about the best way to approach nutrition during a child’s cancer treatment. Also, please go easy on yourself and remember that it’s okay to be flexible and cut corners while your child is in hospital. It won’t cause any harm if you serve Weet-bix for dinner or […]

  • Total body irradiation

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is the term used when radiotherapy is given to the whole body. Radiotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses high energy rays, similar to x-rays. TBI may be used in conjunction with high dose chemotherapy drugs. This is often used in preparation for a stem cell or bone marrow transplant.  This fact sheet from the Paediatric Integrated Cancer Service (PICS) provides information on total body irradiation. The resource gives an overview of: What is total body irradiation? Getting ready for total body irradiation What is it like? Taking care of your child during total body […]

  • Ritchie’s story: Caring for a child with cancer and Down syndrome

    In January Ritchie Farrugia was told his six-year-old daughter Bella had Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia also known as ALL. Bella also has Down syndrome and at the time of diagnosis, Ritchie had already been her full-time carer for the last four years. Cancer Advisor spoke to him about being a dad in a children’s hospital ward and how Down syndrome affects cancer treatment. What’s it like being a dad in a children’s hospital ward? The first few months I stayed at the hospital full-time with Bella. My wife’s back is not too good, not that mine was great but, it was […]

  • Bald Cartoons – free posters and profile pics

    Bald Cartoons is a Brazilian website featuring a range of famous cartoon characters with their heads shaved to help children with cancer not feel ‘different’. The website and heartwarming video below was created by cancer advocacy group GRAACC. The video shows the reactions of children when they see bald characters including Garfield, Hello Kitty and Snoopy. The website also allows families to print out posters or download social media profile pics. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on wellbeing, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Teaching resiliency during paediatric cancer treatment

    The Rare Disease Report in the U.S. has released a video with its transcript on the importance of teaching resiliency during childhood cancer treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on wellbeing, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • “Death doesn’t have to mean failure” – Sacha’s story

    The Guardian in the UK has published Sacha’s story about her son’s end-of-life experience. David, known as DD, was diagnosed with medulloblastoma – a brain tumour – at aged 11. He died five years later. Sacha has since written a book, Follow the Child to help other parents struggling to come to terms with the death of their child. “I consulted four other sets of parents who were passionate about improving end-of-life care,” she explains. “We have laughed and cried and then needed the reassurance of experienced social workers, palliative nurse and paediatric palliative consultants to check our efforts. I only regret that […]

  • “What is cancer?” – video for kids

    The Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation has created a fun and educational video for kids called What is Cancer? Imaginary friends Captain Beakbeard and his first mate Quincy (a squawking human) introduce concepts such as healthy versus unhealthy cells, and cancer treatment. This video is part of the Imaginary Friend Society series of animation videos. Cancer Advisor has a range of content for parents with a child with cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Our Cancer Journey: Team Bella – Never give up!

    In March of 2014, our family was thrown onto the oncology roller coaster when Bella (aged four), was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (high risk). She would complete two and half years of chemotherapy bringing her into remission. Unfortunately, Bella relapsed in March 2017, eight months post treatment.     Bella would endure another eight months of intense treatment (including more intense chemotherapy followed by two bone marrow transplants). During her treatment, as her mum, carer and advocate, I decided to document her arduous journey. To provide awareness about childhood cancer and in doing so, provide hope, comfort and inspiration […]

  • Tips for telling a kid they have cancer

    A paediatric cancer specialist shares their tips for telling a kid they have cancer. For more information, Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on diagnosis. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • Managing work and finances during cancer

    This resource from Redkite provides an overview on managing work and finances during cancer. Practical issues like continuing work or managing bills during treatment can become significant worries for young people facing cancer. If you are a young person with cancer, or you are supporting someone through their cancer journey this web page may help. You may also be eligible for Redkite’s Financial Assistance, check out their financial help page to see if you can get any additional support. If you are eligible for this support, it may include help covering the essentials such as: Bills for electricity, gas, water, rates, […]

  • Looking after yourself while caring for your child

    Paediatric Palliative Care offers tip on looking after yourself when you are caring for a child with a life-limiting illness. Further Reading Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on End of Life including sibling grief, grandparent grief and paediatric palliative care. Please note: if you have any questions that need answering or specific content you want to see, please let us know on our Feedback and Contact. We want to help you find what you’re looking for.

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