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Cancer Advisor
July 31, 2019
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Young Adult (18-24)
  • Ben’s story: ‘Cancer has taught me a lot’

    Diagnosis & treatment After having a sore on his neck for a few weeks Ben decided to make an appointment with his local GP in Perth. Although Ben was more preoccupied about the sore, after hearing about Ben’s history of headaches the doctor insisted on getting tests done. A few weeks later, the 23-year-old was told he had a benign brain tumour and needed surgery. However, after testing the biopsy the tumour turned out to be a malignant four centimetre mass. It was classified as stage 2 with characteristics of stage 3 astrocytoma glioma. The mass was on the right […]

  • Danielle’s story: One day at a time

    They say that our first love will stay in our hearts forever. This couldn’t be more true for 26-year Danielle Paparone. At 19 she was swept off her feet by an affable young man with striking blue eyes. After a blissful year together, he was diagnosed with a brain tumour. However, treatment was unsuccessful, and he died three years after diagnosis. Danielle shares her incredible love story with Cancer Advisor and tells us how she turns her pain into purpose. “He had very big blue eyes and that’s what drew me in,” Danielle says. Jake first laid his big blue […]

  • Adult hospitals and treatment centres in Australia

    When it comes to hospital and treatment centres, teenagers and young people facing cancer have a unique set of needs. Where a young person is treated will most likely depend on their age. If you’re a young adult, you’ll go to an adult hospital. However, teenagers can be sent to either a children’s hospital or an adult facility. What hospital you go to may also depend on where you live or even what type of cancer you have. Not all hospitals offer cancer treatment, so you may have to travel, especially if you live in a regional or rural area. Some […]

  • Advice on friendship during your cancer journey

    This article Cancer and your friends from Redkite offers some advice around friendship during your cancer journey. Often young people find telling their friends about their cancer diagnosis particularly difficult. Even without cancer, people and relationships change – you may find that certain friendships change and new ones may emerge. Some ways to maintain friendships during this time include: Try to be honest and open with them if you can and lean on them when you need to Warn them you may be snappy or angry at times and ask them to forgive you if needed Ask them to keep inviting you […]

  • Angus’ story: Being a transgender childhood cancer survivor

    On the New Zealand website, Stuff, a transgender cancer survivor shares his story of his upcoming mastectomy. Angus Coleman was diagnosed with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) at just 16 months old. LCH is a rare type of cancer that can damage tissue or cause lesions to form in one or more places in the body. During his time with cancer, Angus had ongoing treatment from an endocrinologist which is now helping him take his next steps in his gender transition. “I was actually set up with an endocrinologist back when I was diagnosed with langerhans cell histiocytosis  [rare cancer]which is actually the doctor you need […]

  • Cancer survivor creates empathy cards

    Emily McDowell has created these empathy cards for people with serious illnesses. As a cancer survivor herself, Emily understands that sometimes people don’t know what to say to someone when they are diagnosed with cancer. “The most difficult part of my illness wasn’t losing my hair, or being erroneously called ‘sir’ by Starbucks baristas, or sickness from chemo. It was the loneliness and isolation I felt when many of my close friends and family members disappeared because they didn’t know what to say, or said the absolute wrong thing without realizing it.” – Emily McDowell These quirky empathy cards will […]

  • Looking after yourself during cancer

    This page from Redkite gives an overview of how to take care of yourself physically and emotionally during your cancer journey. A large part of dealing with cancer is learning how to take care of yourself so that you are better prepared for challenges, but also ready to enjoy good things that come your way. Redkite offers tips on: Self-care Looking after your body Looking after your mind Having fun and taking risks Redkite provides a range of support services for young people with cancer including practical tips, financial assistance, and professional counselling. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources […]

  • Battle Weapons: A coping guide for young people with cancer

    Hi, my name is Nell and I’m the author of Battle Weapons: A coping guide for young people with cancer. I’m also a nurse and a cancer survivor. In high school, when we started the discussion about our future, my career advisor suggested nursing. This really appealed to me; to serve and support people at their most vulnerable is a great honour and privilege. Nursing is very diverse and I wasn’t sure for a long time where I wanted to take it, until I was diagnosed with cancer. I know my life’s purpose is to help those with cancer, particularly young people. […]

  • Vlog series by a young adult cancer survivor

    Steph is a 23-year-old outdoor education graduate living in Brisbane. In 2012, Steph told her cancer story as part of Redkite’s partnership with JimmyTeens. Part one: Meet Steph In this first video, Steph talks about how she decided to manage her fertility, what chemotherapy was like, how her friends and family took the news of her cancer diagnosis, and more. “I’m doing this video to help anyone out there in the same boat as me,” she says. Part two: The halfway point As Steph passes the halfway point in her treatment, she talks about how her attitude has changed, why she […]

  • Relapse after cancer as a teen or young adult

    Sometimes, despite the best care and significant progress made in treatment, cancer comes back. When this happens it is called a recurrence or relapse. The likely relapse occurs is that a few of the original cancer cells survived the initial treatment. Sometimes, this is because cancer cells spread to other parts of the body and were too small to be detected during the follow-up immediately after treatment. There can be a lot to manage if you experience relapse after cancer as a teen or young adult. This factsheet by Redkite offers an insight into some of the questions you might be asking yourself […]

  • Cancer treatment for teens and young adults

    This factsheet from Redkite gives an overview on cancer treatment for teens and young adults including: types of cancer treatment, complementary therapy and cancer, clinical trials, side effects, and sticking with treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on cancer treatment, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource. Join our community Cancer Advisor is an online platform with a wide range of cancer advice and knowledge. We provide information for families of children and young people with cancer. You’ll be directed to external websites and sources featuring reliable information […]

  • Advocate for your rights

    What are your rights as someone with cancer? And how can you protect or advocate for these rights? This factsheet by Work After Cancer is funded by the Australian Government to help you understand the law and what your rights and responsibilities are as a person with cancer. Your rights and responsibilities as a patient with cancer: You have a right to fair treatment You do not have to disclose your cancer diagnosis You cannot be denied a job because of cancer You can ask for a reasonable work adjustments You have a responsibility to inform your employer when taking […]

  • If treatment doesn’t work for your cancer

    If treatment doesn’t work is a Redkite information sheet about what happens if your cancer is not curable. It includes topics such as managing emotion, avoidance and distraction, hope and making choices. Being told that your cancer is not curable and facing the idea of dying is the hardest news most people can imagine hearing. Please know that the Redkite support team are here for you and those close to you at this time. Further Reading Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on End of Life including sibling grief, grandparent grief and paediatric palliative care. Please note: if you have any questions that need […]

  • Teen Girl Living With Cancer – Ellie’s Story

    Teen Girl Living with Cancer is a personal blog by childhood cancer advocate, Ellie. You can also follow her on YouTube, Instagram and Facebook. At 14 years old Ellie was diagnosed with a rare childhood cancer called Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma. “It totally flipped my life upside down but now I can use all the horrible experiences I had to inspire and advise you guys.” At the time of writing, her Instagram and Facebook pages were the most up-to-date. On her instagram she says: NED since 22/01/16. I’m in remission. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, […]

  • How cancer may affect fertility

    Redkite gives an overview of how cancer may affect your fertility and the questions you should ask. Cancer Advisor has found a range of resources on cancer fertility. Psst … before you go If you haven’t already make sure to register. That way you can comment, give a ‘thumbs up’ to material you like, and submit your own content. Best of all, you’ll receive information tailored to your specific needs and preferences such as particular cancer type and age group. And you’ll receive regular notifications when fresh content, relevant to you, has been added.

  • Getting back to “normal” after cancer treatment

    Redkite discusses life after cancer treatment including what your new routine might be and late effects. Before you go … Cancer Advisor would love you to share your insights and knowledge. Your story could help other people facing cancer, and make them feel less alone. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • Advocating and problem-solving for those facing cancer

    As a supporter of someone with cancer, you may not realise how involved you can be, and how to advocate on behalf of the person facing cancer, if you choose to. What does advocating mean? Advocating can mean a number of different things: Making sure your voice or opinion is heard Influencing or causing something to change Asking for more information on things like side effects Asking for a second opinion Making sure a young person explores all their fertility options Finding ways to help a young person keep studying One of the most important things you can do is […]

  • Advocating for yourself when you have cancer

    Being a cancer patient or caring for a cancer patient can sometimes feel like you’re always on the receiving end. You receive tests, you receive a diagnosis and you receive treatment. What you may not realise is how involved you can be in the decision-making process if you want to. What is advocating? Advocating has a few different meanings. It can be as simple as making sure your voice or opinion is heard. It can also mean making changes. This might involve something as simple as asking for more information about a side effect or as important as deciding to […]

  • Mouth care

    Looking after your mouth is important, especially when you have cancer. This article from Cancer Research UK covers some common mouth problems and how to cope with them. Mouth care is needed during cancer treatment, if you’re at risk of infections, and if you’re not eating and drinking normally. Proper mouth care will keep your mouth very clean and moist. Common complaints of mouth problems from people with cancer are: Dry mouth Bad breath Changes to taste Mouth sores and infection The article has more information about each of these problems, as well as how to prevent or treat them. […]

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