• A guide for grandparents of children with cancer

    Redkite’s 36-page information booklet helps grandparents of children with cancer. Redkite spoke extensively with grandparents to understand their experiences. This booklet answers some of the many questions which grandparents of children with cancer told Redkite they would have liked answered when their grandchild was diagnosed and during their grandchild’s treatment phase. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for grandparents, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Advice for grandparents and relatives during a child’s diagnosis

    Cancer Australia offers advice advice for grandparents and relatives dealing with their family member’s cancer diagnosis. Cancer Advisor has a range of information for grandparents, or if you have any questions that need answering or specific content you want to see, please let us know on our Feedback and Contact. We want to help you find what you’re looking for. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer.

  • Support for grandparents of kids with cancer

    Grandparents of Kids with Cancer is a web page which offers support for grandparents around the world, giving them a place to share their experiences with other people who have a grandchild with cancer. They advocate for the important role that grandparents play in the family, and acknowledge the emotional and practical needs of grandparents. On the website they say, “Being told that your grandchild has cancer is devastating. Not only is your grandchild going through the most traumatic experience, but your own child is also facing the worst pain imaginable. Talking to other grandparents who are going through the Read more [...]

  • Grandparents, Aunties, Uncles, Friends – Your support is invaluable

    Some parents have suggested that rather than just saying ‘If there’s anything I can do, let me know’, it’s more useful to think about what would truly be helpful and do it. Some great ideas include: cooking meals that can be frozen and bringing them to the hospital or home so a healthy meal is always available offering to spend time with the child so both parents can go out together and have a break doing laundry during hospital stays helping with home and garden upkeep while the family are away in hospital accompanying parents on clinic days as they Read more [...]

  • Support for grandparents whose grandchild has cancer

    Redkite offers support for grandparents dealing with their grandchild’s cancer diagnosis. Cancer Advisor has a range of information for grandparents, or if you have any questions that need answering or specific content you want to see, please let us know on our Feedback and Contact. We want to help you find what you’re looking for. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer.

  • Advocating and problem-solving for those facing cancer

    As a supporter of someone with cancer, you may not realise how involved you can be, and how to advocate on behalf of the person facing cancer, if you choose to. What does advocating mean? Advocating can mean a number of different things: Making sure your voice or opinion is heard Influencing or causing something to change Asking for more information on things like side effects Asking for a second opinion Making sure a young person explores all their fertility options Finding ways to help a young person keep studying One of the most important things you can do is Read more [...]

  • Bereavement and Cancer – Grandparent grief

    The NSW Paediatric Palliative Care Programme share information on grandparent grief. The webpage also features a 40-minute video that interviews two grandparents who have been grieving for their grandchild. Before you go Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on End of Life including sibling grief, grandparent grief and paediatric palliative care. Please note: if you have any questions that need answering or specific content you want to see, please let us know on our Feedback and Contact. We want to help you find what you’re looking for.

  • Caring for a son with cancer

    This New York Times documentary follows the story of Regina Hensley and her son Andrew as he fights an aggressive form of cancer, Ewing’s Sarcoma. For years, Regina Hensley struggled with addiction, even once attempting suicide. When her son Andrew was born, he gave her a reason to live. But when he received his diagnosis at 13 years old, Regina had to search for meaning once again. ‘Without Andrew, I can’t imagine what life would be about.’ -Regina Hensley In response to the documentary, the Times received almost 100 responses from parents who were caring for a sick child. Cancer Advisor Read more [...]

  • Tosh’s story: how he helped end his daughter’s cancer

    After more than two years of chemotherapy, Tosh Nagashima helped end his daughter’s cancer. Cancer Advisor called him to talk about his family’s experience. In March 2014 four-year-old Bella was diagnosed with high-risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL). After arriving at the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne in an ambulance, Bella started chemotherapy immediately. During treatment, Bella’s father continued to work full-time and take care of their youngest daughter Olivia while his wife Vanie spent day and night in the hospital. “After work I would visit Bella in the hospital every day,” he explains. “It was hard for her younger sister Read more [...]