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Cancer Advisor
July 31, 2019
Displaying 1 - 20 of 23
  • Accessing insurance during your child’s cancer treatment

    Redkite’s information sheet covers accessing insurance during your child’s cancer treatment. The various insurance types include: health insurance, life insurance, income protection, trauma insurance, and travel insurance. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • 8 resources for when your child goes back to school after treatment

    If your child has finished their cancer treatment, you might be wondering how they will transition back into full time study. Your child may be looking forward to the social aspect of school … although, they may be nervous too.  Perhaps you’re keen for a new sense of routine, and school seems like a good way to add some structure post-treatment.  You might also be wondering what information or support your child’s teacher will need. Here are some helpful resources if your child is about to start back at school, or just needs some extra support adjusting. 1  A teacher’s […]

  • Advocating and problem-solving for those facing cancer

    As a supporter of someone with cancer, you may not realise how involved you can be, and how to advocate on behalf of the person facing cancer, if you choose to. What does advocating mean? Advocating can mean a number of different things: Making sure your voice or opinion is heard Influencing or causing something to change Asking for more information on things like side effects Asking for a second opinion Making sure a young person explores all their fertility options Finding ways to help a young person keep studying One of the most important things you can do is […]

  • Cognitive difficulties after brain cancer

    The Conversation outlines the ways that cancer in a child’s brain has the potential to impact their overall future health and cause long-term disturbances to the central nervous system of survivors.intro Known as ‘late effects’, these cognition and communication difficulties can affect personal and social development. Early intervention can lessen the impact of such difficulties on survivors.   Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on brain cancer and late effects, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.  

  • Nutrition tips for children during cancer treatment

    You’re probably aware that nutrition plays a huge part in a child’s overall health and wellbeing at any stage of their lives. However, did you know that nutrition may also help your child to better tolerate their cancer treatment, fight infection and assist with their recovery? Here’s what the experts have to say about the best way to approach nutrition during a child’s cancer treatment. Also, please go easy on yourself and remember that it’s okay to be flexible and cut corners while your child is in hospital. It won’t cause any harm if you serve Weet-bix for dinner or […]

  • Navigating finances – using insurance during cancer

    If you’re facing cancer, navigating insurance entitlements might not be on your radar. We’ve found some resources that could help you understand the various insurance entitlements out there and how you can access them. Have we missed something? If there is a finance question you need answered, please don’t hesitate to let us know and we will do what we can to answer it for you. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on finances and cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Ben’s story: ‘Cancer has taught me a lot’

    Diagnosis & treatment After having a sore on his neck for a few weeks Ben decided to make an appointment with his local GP in Perth. Although Ben was more preoccupied about the sore, after hearing about Ben’s history of headaches the doctor insisted on getting tests done. A few weeks later, the 23-year-old was told he had a benign brain tumour and needed surgery. However, after testing the biopsy the tumour turned out to be a malignant four centimetre mass. It was classified as stage 2 with characteristics of stage 3 astrocytoma glioma. The mass was on the right […]

  • Cultural barriers in cancer treatment: Aboriginal communities

    VJOncology (The Video Journal of Oncolgoy) has created a video about the cultural barriers in cancer treatment in regards to Aboriginal communities. In this three minute video, Jasmine Micklem, PhD, of the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute talks with Roslyn Weetra, an Aboriginal Elder and cancer survivor. Even though this video was created in South Australia, Doctor Micklem talks about these barriers as a nationwide issue. She opens with, “We found across all of the states there are disparities, particularly around mortality.” She continues that Aboriginal people are diagnosed with cancer at the same rate as other Australians, however, […]

  • What to pack for the hospital

    Hannah was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia when she was in the eighth grade. In her YouTube video channel (USA) Even More Mermaids Get Leukemia, Hannah and her mum share what to pack for hospital. A few of the items they suggest include: a blanket, face mask, room freshener, throw up bags and slippers with a grip. Please note: Some content contains references to medical treatment; these shouldn’t be considered medical advice. Always speak with a health professional about medical decisions.   Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on hospital information, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your […]

  • Tosh’s story: how he helped end his daughter’s cancer

    After more than two years of chemotherapy, Tosh Nagashima helped end his daughter’s cancer. Cancer Advisor called him to talk about his family’s experience. In March 2014 four-year-old Bella was diagnosed with high-risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL). After arriving at the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne in an ambulance, Bella started chemotherapy immediately. During treatment, Bella’s father continued to work full-time and take care of their youngest daughter Olivia while his wife Vanie spent day and night in the hospital. “After work I would visit Bella in the hospital every day,” he explains. “It was hard for her younger sister […]

  • Motivation

    What is motivation? Where does motivation come from, and how do we find it? We all kind of know what it is, but often it just seems like something that is missing. Some people seem so full of motivation and energy, but for most of us, it’s common to feel like motivation is hard to find, and even harder to hang on to, especially when it comes to tasks we find tedious, time consuming or not very high on our list of priorities. So when we’re going through a difficult time, such as the frightening experience of your child receiving […]

  • Adult hospitals and treatment centres in Australia

    When it comes to hospital and treatment centres, teenagers and young people facing cancer have a unique set of needs. Where a young person is treated will most likely depend on their age. If you’re a young adult, you’ll go to an adult hospital. However, teenagers can be sent to either a children’s hospital or an adult facility. What hospital you go to may also depend on where you live or even what type of cancer you have. Not all hospitals offer cancer treatment, so you may have to travel, especially if you live in a regional or rural area. Some […]

  • Our Cancer Journey: Team Bella – Never give up!

    In March of 2014, our family was thrown onto the oncology roller coaster when Bella (aged four), was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (high risk). She would complete two and half years of chemotherapy bringing her into remission. Unfortunately, Bella relapsed in March 2017, eight months post treatment.     Bella would endure another eight months of intense treatment (including more intense chemotherapy followed by two bone marrow transplants). During her treatment, as her mum, carer and advocate, I decided to document her arduous journey. To provide awareness about childhood cancer and in doing so, provide hope, comfort and inspiration […]

  • Homeschool – Your Rules

        Homeschooling: it may seem like an odd topic to cover when all you can think about is your child getting through treatment and being okay; when the most important thing right now is avoiding coronavirus – or any virus or infection for that matter. We understand that getting through treatment is a family’s number one priority.  We hear that homeschooling is an added stress that comes up, particularly now with COVID-19. This article covers some ways parents can consider their homeschooling approaches through cancer treatment, and through COVID-19 and beyond. Working with your values about learning Before you […]

  • Children’s hospitals in Australia

    Children’s hospitals (also known as paediatric hospitals) specialise in the medical needs of children and teenagers. At children’s hospital the staff are specifically trained in taking care of children and teenagers. Chances are there will also be more child-geared activities on hand such as kids films and child entertainers. Expand the boxes below to learn more about children’s hospitals in each state. Some children’s hospitals do not treat children’s cancer, so you may need to move to a different state for treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for families who need to do this, including personal stories from […]

  • “Cancer anger”, explained by a therapist

    “Cancer anger” is a common experience for people facing cancer. In this Mighty article on cancer anger, therapist Karin Sieger explains: What is cancer anger? When does it happen? Who gets it? And what can you do about it?  “Cancer anger is a normal response to fear, despair and grief – a range of feelings which cancer brings into our lives. It can show as frustration, irritability, emotional withdrawal or aggression. You can feel it whether you have been diagnosed or you are a relative or friend. Cancer anger can happen at any stage of the illness, even years after treatment.” –  Karin Sieger Have you […]

  • “What is cancer?” – video for kids

    The Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation has created a fun and educational video for kids called What is Cancer? Imaginary friends Captain Beakbeard and his first mate Quincy (a squawking human) introduce concepts such as healthy versus unhealthy cells, and cancer treatment. This video is part of the Imaginary Friend Society series of animation videos. Cancer Advisor has a range of content for parents with a child with cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Leaving hospital

    When a child or young person finishes cancer treatment it can be a time of mixed emotions. Often this is a long anticipated event, and when it feels like they should be happy and celebrating, families may also feel anxious and overwhelmed. Leaving hospital and going home will be a different experience for each person, but Cancer Advisor has some resources on finishing treatment that may be useful. “Leaving hospital can be a scary time for a lot of families. They talk about leaving the safety net of the hospital, leaving their oncology family. Often losing this close support is the […]

  • Grandparents, Aunties, Uncles, Friends – Your support is invaluable

    Some parents have suggested that rather than just saying ‘If there’s anything I can do, let me know’, it’s more useful to think about what would truly be helpful and do it. Some great ideas include: cooking meals that can be frozen and bringing them to the hospital or home so a healthy meal is always available offering to spend time with the child so both parents can go out together and have a break doing laundry during hospital stays helping with home and garden upkeep while the family are away in hospital accompanying parents on clinic days as they […]

  • Isolation and Social Connectedness

      Isolation is one of the big changes almost everyone is experiencing in their lives right now. In times of stress, being disconnected from others can be particularly hard. COVID-19 is likely to keep influencing our lives in the coming months, so it’s important to make sure we’re looking after ourselves. Humans are social beings. Evidence shows that loneliness and isolation aren’t good for our health. Even if we’re naturally introverted, connecting with others is an important part of looking after our wellbeing.   What is social connectedness? ‘Social distancing’ isn’t the right term for what we need right now. […]

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