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Cancer Advisor
July 31, 2019
Displaying 1 - 20 of 97
  • Breakdown of the healthy eating pyramid

    Solaris Cancer Care has published a blog on the healthy eating pyramid. This simple visual guide shows the types and proportion of foods that we should eat every day for good health based on the AUSTRALIAN DIETARY GUIDELINES (2013). Note: Solaris Cancer Care published this blog post on June 2nd, 2015. For more information, Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on nutrition. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • Medicare Rebates: Better Access to Mental Health Care

    Cancer patients could be eligible for Medicare rebates for mental health care. This factsheet outlines Medicare’s initiative titled: Better Access to Psychiatrists, Psychologists and General Practitioners through the Medicare Benefits Schedule (Better Access). It covers what Medicare rebates are available to patients for selected mental health services provided by GPs, psychiatrists, psychologists, and eligible social workers and occupational therapists. The factsheet also provides concise information about how to access the program through a referral from a GP. Have you accessed this rebate? Tell us about it in the comments below. Your unique experiences could help others facing  cancer.  Before you go We’d love […]

  • Evaluating health information on the internet

    The Sydney Children’s Hospital Network has created a factsheet called Evaluating health information on the internet to help you navigate health information. It says, “It is important to evaluate the information you have found during a search on the Internet to make sure it is accurate and comes from a reliable source. When evaluating, think critically and don’t accept any information at face value.” The factsheets also suggests that you ask yourself questions such : Who is responsible for the website or social media channel? Is the information accurate? Is the information objective? Is the information up-to-date? Does the content of […]

  • Helping healthy children cope when a sibling has cancer

    Cancer.Net offers advice on how to help healthy children cope when a sibling has cancer. It’s been broken up into three sections including: Recognize emotions that siblings may feel Understand what behavior to expect from siblings Help siblings cope Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for siblings, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Accessing insurance during your child’s cancer treatment

    Redkite’s information sheet covers accessing insurance during your child’s cancer treatment. The various insurance types include: health insurance, life insurance, income protection, trauma insurance, and travel insurance. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • Livewire – an online community for teens

    When you’re a teenager with a serious illness, not many people really get what you’re going through – and it can be hard for siblings too. That’s why we’ve created Livewire: a safe community for young people aged 12-20 living with disability, serious illness or a chronic health condition who can do with crew who understand and offer a little extra support. Online, Livewire is a place you can visit any time, knowing you’re always amongst friends who genuinely care. Here, you can swap stories, ask for ideas, and talk about whatever’s going on in your life, from operations, MRIs […]

  • 8 resources for when your child goes back to school after treatment

    If your child has finished their cancer treatment, you might be wondering how they will transition back into full time study. Your child may be looking forward to the social aspect of school … although, they may be nervous too.  Perhaps you’re keen for a new sense of routine, and school seems like a good way to add some structure post-treatment.  You might also be wondering what information or support your child’s teacher will need. Here are some helpful resources if your child is about to start back at school, or just needs some extra support adjusting. 1  A teacher’s […]

  • Advocating and problem-solving for those facing cancer

    As a supporter of someone with cancer, you may not realise how involved you can be, and how to advocate on behalf of the person facing cancer, if you choose to. What does advocating mean? Advocating can mean a number of different things: Making sure your voice or opinion is heard Influencing or causing something to change Asking for more information on things like side effects Asking for a second opinion Making sure a young person explores all their fertility options Finding ways to help a young person keep studying One of the most important things you can do is […]

  • Managing pain during cancer

    This content is not a substitute for medical advice. Please consult with your doctor or other health professional to make sure this information is right for you. US website Cancer.Net has a range of resources for young adults with cancer, including pain management information. Many patients and survivors experience pain during and after cancer treatment. It may help to know that cancer pain can be treated successfully for most patients. But it is important to focus on managing pain during all phases of cancer treatment and into survivorship. This website offers information on the following topics: Pain: Causes and Diagnosis […]

  • How your general practice team can support you

    This fact sheet from the Australian Cancer Survivorship Centre (ACSC) offers information about involving your general practice team in your healthcare following cancer treatment. It offers some key insights and tips: • Your GP is the cornerstone of your healthcare. • Make a long appointment with your GP to develop an after treatment health plan. • Your GP and GPN are well placed to help you manage the effects of cancer treatment. • Your GP and GPN can support you to make healthy lifestyle choices. • Lifestyle changes may help reduce the risk of cancer coming back, and help you […]

  • Rare Cancers Australia – KnowledgeBase Patient Support Program

    Rare Cancers Australia has developed the KnowledgeBase as a part of their Patient Support Program aimed at providing patients with a centre of knowledge, guidance, advice and hope. The web page includes a wide range of resources including directories for: Cancer Types Cancer Services Health Professionals Support Services Clinical Trials  Childhood cancers are, by definition, rare or less common (RLC) cancers. There are over 200 different types of RLC cancers, so navigating services and treatment can be difficult for patients and their families. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on rare cancers, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave […]

  • Cognitive difficulties after brain cancer

    The Conversation outlines the ways that cancer in a child’s brain has the potential to impact their overall future health and cause long-term disturbances to the central nervous system of survivors.intro Known as ‘late effects’, these cognition and communication difficulties can affect personal and social development. Early intervention can lessen the impact of such difficulties on survivors.   Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on brain cancer and late effects, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.  

  • Australian children’s cancer clinical trials registry

    The Australian and New Zealand Haemotolgy/Oncology Centre (ANZCHOG) has created a children’s cancer clinical trials registry. On the website it says: “This registry lists all clinical trials open to children and adolescents with cancer or blood disorders currently in progress at children’s cancer centres in Australia. This information should be used in conjunction with advice from health care professionals.” ANZCHOG also answers FAQs such as: What is a clinical trial? What does it mean for my child? Who should I talk to about potential clinical trials? How can I receive more information? Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on […]

  • Nutrition tips for children during cancer treatment

    You’re probably aware that nutrition plays a huge part in a child’s overall health and wellbeing at any stage of their lives. However, did you know that nutrition may also help your child to better tolerate their cancer treatment, fight infection and assist with their recovery? Here’s what the experts have to say about the best way to approach nutrition during a child’s cancer treatment. Also, please go easy on yourself and remember that it’s okay to be flexible and cut corners while your child is in hospital. It won’t cause any harm if you serve Weet-bix for dinner or […]

  • ONTrac at Peter Mac

    The ONTrac at Peter Mac Cancer Service is located at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Victoria, Australia. Their multidisciplinary team of health professionals works together to ensure that young people are supported before, during and after their cancer treatment. This web page includes information on clinical services for young people like: diagnosis and disease management, palliative and survivorship care, general adolescent health, emotional and mental health concerns, fertility and sexual health, physical and nutritional wellbeing, school and vocation support, and family-focused treatments. The service also provides : Secondary consultation service, Professional development, education and training, research and data collection program, […]

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