Search Results

Cancer Advisor
July 31, 2019
Displaying 1 - 20 of 33
  • PICS podcast about siblings of cancer patients

    Paediatric Integrated Cancer Service (PICS) have produced a 16-minute podcast about siblings of a cancer patient. This episode is one in a series called Life After Treatment. In episode 3 – a family therapist (Maria) and a mother (Bridget) talk about going through the cancer journey in regards to Noah who was born four months after his big brother Leo was diagnosed with cancer. The podcast also provides suggestions on how to manage emotions and other issues that parents and siblings might face. For further reading, Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on siblings. Or, if you have any questions that need […]

  • Siblings and grief

    Paediatric Palliative Care provide helpful information to help you navigate siblings and grief. It breaks it down by ages including teenagers and primary-school children. It also offers useful resources and books. Further Reading Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on End of Life including sibling grief, grandparent grief and paediatric palliative care. Please note: if you have any questions that need answering or specific content you want to see, please let us know on our Feedback and Contact. We want to help you find what you’re looking for.

  • Supporting siblings of childhood cancer patients

    This web page on the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute website discusses how various support services can support siblings of childhood cancer patients. Please note: this article mentions children who have died. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on siblings, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Siblings You Matter! – a short documentary

    Hi, My name is Genevieve Stonebridge, and I am a clinical counsellor in Victoria, BC, Canada. I created this short video ‘You Matter’ from a research study I did on the experience of undiagnosed siblings who had a brother or sister with cancer. If you want to know why I created this video and my personal connection to cancer, please read more below. If you want to just skip to learning some ways you can help support siblings then please press play!   Why I made this video: When I was 18 I was diagnosed with and treated for Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (that […]

  • Feel the Magic – helping kids deal with grief

    Feel the Magic provides grief education and support to bereaved children and their families. They hope to help alleviate the pain and isolation felt by the death of a loved one including siblings of children and young people who have died of cancer. Their biggest program is Camp Magic – Australia’s largest and leading grief education and support program for bereaved children and teenagers between the ages of 7-17. Camp Magic is held over a three-day weekend during the NSW school holidays. Currently there are four camps held each year in the months of April, July, October and December. It is supported and […]

  • For young adults – cancer and your family

    If you’re a young person diagnosed with cancer you probably have lots of questions about how it will affect your family. While every family is different and has its own strengths and quirks, it may be helpful to consider some common questions. Click on a section below to see some tips and hints, as well as recommendations for further reading. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for young people facing cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Livewire – an online community for teens

    When you’re a teenager with a serious illness, not many people really get what you’re going through – and it can be hard for siblings too. That’s why we’ve created Livewire: a safe community for young people aged 12-20 living with disability, serious illness or a chronic health condition who can do with crew who understand and offer a little extra support. Online, Livewire is a place you can visit any time, knowing you’re always amongst friends who genuinely care. Here, you can swap stories, ask for ideas, and talk about whatever’s going on in your life, from operations, MRIs […]

  • Advocating and problem-solving for those facing cancer

    As a supporter of someone with cancer, you may not realise how involved you can be, and how to advocate on behalf of the person facing cancer, if you choose to. What does advocating mean? Advocating can mean a number of different things: Making sure your voice or opinion is heard Influencing or causing something to change Asking for more information on things like side effects Asking for a second opinion Making sure a young person explores all their fertility options Finding ways to help a young person keep studying One of the most important things you can do is […]

  • Childhood cancer: Reflections from a sister

    In this short video from the American Cancer Society, Sophie opens up about what it’s like to be sister to a child with cancer. Sophie’s brother was just three years old when he was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma. Although her brother survived his cancer, Sophie talks about the lasting emotional impact it has had on her. She talks about her experience as a sibling, noting that cancer had a profound impact on her formative years. When a child or a young person is diagnosed with cancer, the enormity of this is felt throughout the family. In particular, siblings of any age feel the […]

  • Help for brothers and sisters – a video for kids

    When it comes to childhood cancer, brothers and sisters of a diagnosed child have specific needs. In fact, many “well” siblings will report feeling alone, lost and neglected. While there are various materials available that have been specifically written for parents to help address these needs, we’ve found a resource that is specifically geared to kids themselves – both the diagnosed and the well sibling! The Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation in the U.S. created this fun and educational video as a way to emotionally support siblings of kids with cancer. The video is part of the Imaginary Friend Society series and was […]

  • Sibling support during palliative care

    Siblings need support and resources when their brother or sister is in palliative care. This factsheet from Paediatric Palliative Care provides information on how you might tell your children about the diagnosis of a life-limiting. Further Reading Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on End of Life including sibling grief, grandparent grief and paediatric palliative care. Otherwise, take a look at Cancer Advisor’s recommended sibling posts. Please note: if you have any questions that need answering or specific content you want to see, please let us know on our Feedback and Contact. We want to help you find what you’re looking for.

  • Sibling support from CanTeen

    My brother or sister has cancer is a suite of information resources for young people who have a sibling with cancer published by CanTeen. This sibling support resources are aimed mostly at teenagers and young adults, so for supporting a younger sibling you may wish to check out these other resources on Cancer Advisor.  It can be really hard to ask for support. You might not be able to find the right words, feel embarrassed or scared of getting upset. Talking things through can be a big relief. It can help to put things into perspective and sort things out in your head. […]

  • Adult sleep problems after childhood cancer

    The American Association of the Advancement of Science has reported that childhood cancer survivors are more likely to experience sleep problems as adults. “Results show that cancer survivors were more likely than siblings to report sleep problems as adults … survivors were 31 percent more likely to report daytime sleepiness and 26 percent more likely to have poor ‘sleep efficiency,’.” The study involved nearly 2000 childhood cancer survivors. “Participants had a mean age of 35 years and a mean time since diagnosis of 23.5 years. The study also involved 380 siblings with a mean age of 33 years.” Cancer Advisor has […]

  • Caring for a son with cancer

    This New York Times documentary follows the story of Regina Hensley and her son Andrew as he fights an aggressive form of cancer, Ewing’s Sarcoma. For years, Regina Hensley struggled with addiction, even once attempting suicide. When her son Andrew was born, he gave her a reason to live. But when he received his diagnosis at 13 years old, Regina had to search for meaning once again. ‘Without Andrew, I can’t imagine what life would be about.’ -Regina Hensley In response to the documentary, the Times received almost 100 responses from parents who were caring for a sick child. Cancer Advisor […]

  • Helping healthy children cope when a sibling has cancer

    Cancer.Net offers advice on how to help healthy children cope when a sibling has cancer. It’s been broken up into three sections including: Recognize emotions that siblings may feel Understand what behavior to expect from siblings Help siblings cope Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for siblings, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • For teachers: Cancer in the school community

    This booklet from Camp Quality offers tips for supporting children facing cancer in the school environment. This may include children with cancer, siblings of children with cancer, or children who have a parent with cancer. For any school experiencing cancer, it is important that teachers and support staff are equipped to educate the children about cancer and answer any difficult questions. Common questions from classmates include: How did they get sick? Can I catch it? Should I share things that are bothering me? They seem silly or trivial compared to what my friend is going through. What am I supposed […]

Comments

Comments will appear below.