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Cancer Advisor
July 31, 2019
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  • Transport and accommodation assistance NSW

    The Isolated Patients Travel and Accommodation Assistance Scheme (IPTAAS) is a NSW Government initiative.  Designed to help isolated patients, IPTAAS offer financial assistance towards transport and accommodation costs.  This is for patients who need to travel long distances for specialist medical treatment that is not available locally. To be eligible to claim through IPTAAS you must meet the following criteria: Be a resident of NSW or Lord Howe Island Hold a Medicare card Live more than 100km from the nearest treating specialist or your combined trips to and from the specialist exceeds 200km/week Specialist treatment not available locally Ineligible for any other […]

  • Paediatric Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This article from Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center in the US provides an overview of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). MDS is a rare disease that develops in the bone marrow. There are different types of MDS in children, and this article will tell you more about: What is myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)? What causes MDS? What are the different types of MDS? What are the symptoms of MDS? How do you diagnose MDS? How do you treat MDS in children? What is the prognosis for a child with MDS? What is the long-term outlook? What is the latest research on […]

  • Financial checkups after childhood cancer

    Childhood cancer survivors need financial checkups as adults. The US website Marketwatch explains that in addition to health checkups, cancer survivors will need financial checkups post treatment too. The article referenced a study published by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in New York City. The study included almost 3,000 long-term paediatric cancer survivors aged between 18 and 65. “More than half said they were worried about paying for care and one-third said finances kept them from seeking medical care. (They were, on average, 23 years from their diagnosis and all had been treated at St. Jude.)”     Beyond the impact that […]

  • Advice and information on fatigue caused by brain tumours

    Fatigue can be a challenging side effect of brain tumours. If you have a brain tumour you may be wondering about how you can navigate this side effect. This factsheet from UK organisation The Brain Tumour Charity provides information and practical suggestions for coping with the emotional and physical aspects of fatigue caused by brain tumours. To open the factsheet explains: “Fatigue is often described as a persistent feeling of being tired, weak, worn out, slow or heavy. It is a common symptom for people with all types and grades of brain tumour. Cancer-related fatigue is often talked about, but less acknowledged […]

  • Cultural barriers in cancer treatment: Aboriginal communities

    VJOncology (The Video Journal of Oncolgoy) has created a video about the cultural barriers in cancer treatment in regards to Aboriginal communities. In this three minute video, Jasmine Micklem, PhD, of the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute talks with Roslyn Weetra, an Aboriginal Elder and cancer survivor. Even though this video was created in South Australia, Doctor Micklem talks about these barriers as a nationwide issue. She opens with, “We found across all of the states there are disparities, particularly around mortality.” She continues that Aboriginal people are diagnosed with cancer at the same rate as other Australians, however, […]

  • 10 tips for coping with scanxiety by a cancer survivor

    As the name suggests, scanxiety is the anxiety a person feels in the lead-up to a cancer-detecting scan. It also includes the anxiety when waiting for the results after a scan. On Cure Today, childhood cancer survivor Tori Tomalia talks about her 10 tips for coping with scanxiety. Tori was cancer-free for over 20 years before she was diagnosed with lung cancer. The mother of three is also a wife, theatre artist, writer and lung cancer awareness advocate. Since her diagnosis in 2013 she has been having scans every three months. She says, “The week or so leading up to my […]

  • Rare Cancers Australia – KnowledgeBase Patient Support Program

    Rare Cancers Australia has developed the KnowledgeBase as a part of their Patient Support Program aimed at providing patients with a centre of knowledge, guidance, advice and hope. The web page includes a wide range of resources including directories for: Cancer Types Cancer Services Health Professionals Support Services Clinical Trials  Childhood cancers are, by definition, rare or less common (RLC) cancers. There are over 200 different types of RLC cancers, so navigating services and treatment can be difficult for patients and their families. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on rare cancers, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave […]

  • Bereavement and grief

    Bereavement is the loss of someone through death, and grief is our response to loss. The grief that follows a young person’s death lasts a lifetime, and losing a child to cancer is one of the most devastating things that can happen to any family. When your child dies is a booklet from Redkite that uses the real experiences of bereaved parents to help other parents and carers following the death of their child.  It is important to remember that grief is personal and unique – everybody grieves differently and that’s okay. There will be a number of different factors that will […]

  • How your general practice team can support you

    This fact sheet from the Australian Cancer Survivorship Centre (ACSC) offers information about involving your general practice team in your healthcare following cancer treatment. It offers some key insights and tips: • Your GP is the cornerstone of your healthcare. • Make a long appointment with your GP to develop an after treatment health plan. • Your GP and GPN are well placed to help you manage the effects of cancer treatment. • Your GP and GPN can support you to make healthy lifestyle choices. • Lifestyle changes may help reduce the risk of cancer coming back, and help you […]

  • Lymphoma Australia resources, hotlines and more

    Lymphoma Australia is the only national charity dedicated to Lymphoma. Lymphoma Australia’s resources include: a factsheet on all you need to know about hodgkin lymphoma and the different subtypes. It explains the cancer, how it is diagnosed, the treatment involved, supports available and treatments under investigation. It is available to download and print from Lymphoma Australia website. a resource booklet for anyone with a new diagnosis of lymphoma including all information you need to know about this cancer, the lymphatic system, how it is diagnosed, different treatments, supports available and clinical trials. It is available to order online, download or print through […]

  • Kids Kicking Cancer: martial arts therapy

    Kids Kicking Cancer is a not-for-profit organisation that teaches the mind-body techniques of Martial Arts instruction, breath work and meditation to empower children beyond the pain and discomfort of disease. Kids Kicking Cancer now offers help and services to not only cancer patients, but any child in pain from a serious illness. They currently operate the Heroes’ Circle program in America, Canada, Israel and Italy and support ill children and their siblings aged 3-23 years old. Using martial arts therapy, Kids Kicking Cancer staff teaches ill children and their siblings to: Regain a sense of control over the chaos of their […]

  • World Health Organization says processed meat causes cancer

    The American Cancer Society has published an article stating that the cancer agency of the World Health Organization says processed meat causes cancer. “Twenty-two experts from 10 countries reviewed more than 800 studies to reach their conclusions … IARC published its report online October 26, 2015 in The Lancet Oncology.” Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on nutrition, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Cancer information for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

    The Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council Cancer Council NSW has created cancer information resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. One of the resources is Aboriginal cancer journeys: Our stories of kinship, hope and survival is a factsheet and a booklet of stories from Indigenous people affected by cancer. The PDF was created with funding provided by Cancer Australia, the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW and Cancer Council NSW. This page also links to the Aboriginal Cancer Council website with information about cancer, treatment, support and research. It includes information for the community and health workers […]

  • Adult sleep problems after childhood cancer

    The American Association of the Advancement of Science has reported that childhood cancer survivors are more likely to experience sleep problems as adults. “Results show that cancer survivors were more likely than siblings to report sleep problems as adults … survivors were 31 percent more likely to report daytime sleepiness and 26 percent more likely to have poor ‘sleep efficiency,’.” The study involved nearly 2000 childhood cancer survivors. “Participants had a mean age of 35 years and a mean time since diagnosis of 23.5 years. The study also involved 380 siblings with a mean age of 33 years.” Cancer Advisor has […]

  • Oncology parental support Facebook groups – QLD

    In Queensland at Lady Cilento Childrens Hospital there are two parent support Facebook groups. The first one is for all parents and called ‘The Real Housewives of 11B’. The second is for fathers or similar male significant family members of an oncology child and called ‘LCCH Oncology dads’. Both are run by parents, have set guidelines and all requests to join must respond to a set group of questions. Neither allow staff, support staff or charity staff to join and neither are affiliated with Queensland Health. They are both simply support groups, run by the parents for the parents. The […]

  • What not to say to someone with cancer

    BBC 3 has created a video of things not to say to someone with cancer including: “So is it all working down there?” “How long do you have left?” “You’re so brave” The video also gives a good insight into various people’s personal experiences with cancer, and finishes with the question, “What should you say?” Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for friends and relatives of people with cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • From vulnerability to resilience during childhood cancer

    In this powerful ASCO journal article, a mother reflects on how her family evolved from vulnerability to resilience during childhood cancer. The childhood cancer patient is referred to as Ben, which is a pseudonym. The article explains, “Although this is the story of 4-year-old Ben, we believe that his and his family’s experiences are relevant to patients of any age who have cancer. (We preserve his anonymity to empower him to decide whether and how to tell his story of vulnerability as an adult.)” Empowerment and resilience are the main themes in this article; and ASCO offers practical tips that […]

  • Questions to ask your doctor – Leukaemia Foundation

    The Leukaemia Foundation has created a list of general questions to ask your doctor at both diagnosis and routine appointments. Cancer Advisor has a range of content on questions to ask your treating team, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Could ‘disease prestige’ impact resources and support?

    In this article, The Conversation discusses ‘disease prestige’ and how it impacts resources and support. The article is titled: When you’re sick, the support you’ll get may depend on the ‘worth’ of your disease and looks at: high vs low prestige diseases, research (including research funding) around disease prestige, disease prestige ranking of 40 conditions and illnesses, and A tale of mental illness, a TED talk by Elyn Saks. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on support services, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Eating well during cancer treatment

    This article from Australian Healthy Food Guide offers some tips for eating well during cancer treatment. Dietitian Charlotte Graydon discusses some of the common eating problems, and solutions, for cancer patients. “There are few families who haven’t been affected by cancer in some way. Cancer treatment and surgery are major issues to face during this time. And eating well brings yet another set of challenges into the mix. Your body is under a lot of stress during treatment and, while maintaining a healthy diet is essential, it can be difficult. The cancer itself can cause taste changes, fatigue, anxiety, depression […]

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