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Cancer Advisor
July 31, 2019
Displaying 41 - 60 of 1042
  • Cancer vs VR

    US startup OnComfort is using virtual reality tools to reduce anxiety in cancer patients. Their apps have been shown to reduce stress, anxiety, and even the need for pain medication. The five apps use a variety of techniques to achieve this, you can learn more via these links: Aqua – an immersive experience that reduces pain and anxiety by inducing relaxation in an undersea environment AMO – an experience that uses clinical hypnosis techniques to ease pain and anxiety while a patient undergoes a short invasive procedure KIMO – for use in paediatrics, KIMO distracts and empowers patients by enabling them to fight […]

  • Who is who in your treating team at hospital

    If you are about to go to hospital for cancer treatment you might be wondering who is who in your treating team at hospital. Canteen has published a list of who is who in a hospital medical team. “They could be involved in: Administering treatment, Giving you information and advice. Or simply supporting you and your family during this time” The treating team includes: Medical Oncologist Radiation Oncologist Surgical Oncologist Radiologist Oncology Nurse Specialist Registered Nurse Registrar Resident/Intern It also discusses the roles of a social worker, physiotherapist, clinical psychologist and a dietitian. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on the […]

  • Celebrating oncology nurses

    When it comes to cancer treatment, oncology nurses who care for teenagers and children are an integral part to a treatment team. Nurses can also transform a hospital experience – they can become an advocate, a teacher, a healer and in some cases, even a friend. To celebrate paediatric and teenage oncology nurses, we’ve found some videos that highlight how nurses have impacted the lives of their patients. Watch the videos now and tell us in the comments which is your favourite. Please note: These videos were filmed in the US and the UK. However, we’d love to share stories and […]

  • What to say to your friend who has just been bereaved

    This blog post on Let’s Talk About Loss discusses what to say to your friend who has just been bereaved. The author of the blog is Beth Rowland whose mother died when she was 20. However, the practical advice in this post is also relevant for people hoping to support and communicate with a bereaved parent. Beth says, “I’ve experienced my fair share of people ‘putting their foot in it’ and saying the wrong thing, so I’m going to attempt to pass on a few pearls of wisdom about what to say – and what not to say – when the […]

  • Cancer survivor creates empathy cards

    Emily McDowell has created these empathy cards for people with serious illnesses. As a cancer survivor herself, Emily understands that sometimes people don’t know what to say to someone when they are diagnosed with cancer. “The most difficult part of my illness wasn’t losing my hair, or being erroneously called ‘sir’ by Starbucks baristas, or sickness from chemo. It was the loneliness and isolation I felt when many of my close friends and family members disappeared because they didn’t know what to say, or said the absolute wrong thing without realizing it.” – Emily McDowell These quirky empathy cards will […]

  • Children’s hospitals in Australia

    Children’s hospitals (also known as paediatric hospitals) specialise in the medical needs of children and teenagers. At children’s hospital the staff are specifically trained in taking care of children and teenagers. Chances are there will also be more child-geared activities on hand such as kids films and child entertainers. Expand the boxes below to learn more about children’s hospitals in each state. Some children’s hospitals do not treat children’s cancer, so you may need to move to a different state for treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for families who need to do this, including personal stories from […]

  • Leaving hospital

    When a child or young person finishes cancer treatment it can be a time of mixed emotions. Often this is a long anticipated event, and when it feels like they should be happy and celebrating, families may also feel anxious and overwhelmed. Leaving hospital and going home will be a different experience for each person, but Cancer Advisor has some resources on finishing treatment that may be useful. “Leaving hospital can be a scary time for a lot of families. They talk about leaving the safety net of the hospital, leaving their oncology family. Often losing this close support is the […]

  • Nerida’s story: Turning Brisbane gold for kids with cancer

    The 1st of September is our D-Day anniversary, so this year I decided to channel my energy into something positive. I turned Brisbane Gold. Brisbane City Hall, The Story Bridge and Victoria Bridge all shone gold for Childhood Cancer Awareness. This is how it happened: Receiving a diagnosis On the 1st September 2015 my Son Xavier was diagnosed with Stage III Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma of the bladder at just 23 months of age. We had to move to Brisbane from Townsville for treatment and as I knew very few people here, I started a Facebook support group page for the oncology […]

  • Caring for a son with cancer

    This New York Times documentary follows the story of Regina Hensley and her son Andrew as he fights an aggressive form of cancer, Ewing’s Sarcoma. For years, Regina Hensley struggled with addiction, even once attempting suicide. When her son Andrew was born, he gave her a reason to live. But when he received his diagnosis at 13 years old, Regina had to search for meaning once again. ‘Without Andrew, I can’t imagine what life would be about.’ -Regina Hensley In response to the documentary, the Times received almost 100 responses from parents who were caring for a sick child. Cancer Advisor […]

  • Cnected – Cancer app created by cancer survivor

    Hi, I’m Jack – the creator of the cancer app Cnected, I am 21 years old. In October 2017 I was diagnosed with a rare stage III cancer (undifferentiated carcinoma), and decided to set up an Instagram page to document my journey (@itsme_jmo). Following intense and aggressive chemo and radiotherapy for head and neck tumours at The Royal Marsden, in May of this year I was thankfully given a clean bill of health. Over the past few months, through my Instagram page, I connected with many cancer patients, survivors and family members of patients. I realised how powerful and beneficial social […]

  • Nutrition tips for children during cancer treatment

    You’re probably aware that nutrition plays a huge part in a child’s overall health and wellbeing at any stage of their lives. However, did you know that nutrition may also help your child to better tolerate their cancer treatment, fight infection and assist with their recovery? Here’s what the experts have to say about the best way to approach nutrition during a child’s cancer treatment. Also, please go easy on yourself and remember that it’s okay to be flexible and cut corners while your child is in hospital. It won’t cause any harm if you serve Weet-bix for dinner or […]

  • International Childhood Cancer Awareness Month

    September is International Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. Cancer Australia describes Childhood Cancer Awareness Month as “a time when cancer organisations around the world put the spotlight on children’s cancer and the need to improve diagnosis, treatment and outcomes.” This annual event was first launched in 2010 by then American president, Barack Obama. The symbol for International Childhood Cancer Awareness Month is a gold ribbon. According to Go Gold Australia: “A group of parents initiated the gold ribbon back in 1997. Now an international symbol, the gold ribbon creates global unity and represents all kids diagnosed with cancer and their families. The colour gold was […]

  • Transport and accommodation assistance NSW

    The Isolated Patients Travel and Accommodation Assistance Scheme (IPTAAS) is a NSW Government initiative.  Designed to help isolated patients, IPTAAS offer financial assistance towards transport and accommodation costs.  This is for patients who need to travel long distances for specialist medical treatment that is not available locally. To be eligible to claim through IPTAAS you must meet the following criteria: Be a resident of NSW or Lord Howe Island Hold a Medicare card Live more than 100km from the nearest treating specialist or your combined trips to and from the specialist exceeds 200km/week Specialist treatment not available locally Ineligible for any other […]

  • Total body irradiation

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is the term used when radiotherapy is given to the whole body. Radiotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses high energy rays, similar to x-rays. TBI may be used in conjunction with high dose chemotherapy drugs. This is often used in preparation for a stem cell or bone marrow transplant.  This fact sheet from the Paediatric Integrated Cancer Service (PICS) provides information on total body irradiation. The resource gives an overview of: What is total body irradiation? Getting ready for total body irradiation What is it like? Taking care of your child during total body […]

  • Born with cancer

    This article, published by the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, features Carrick Stafford Wood who was born with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), a rare type of cancer. Carrick didn’t leave hospital for the first six months of his life, but finally returned home on Christmas Day. “It’s unusual [for a baby to be born with cancer]but it can happen. The most common cancer in newborns is neuroblastoma – a rare cancer of the developing nervous system (…) neuroblastomas and teratomas in newborns are usually very treatable, and most children are cured. Infantile leukemia is hard to treat, but again, with aggressive therapy, we […]

  • Working through treatment

    In this 11-minute TED Talk, lawyer Sarah Donnelly talks about her experiences working through treatment for breast cancer.  You can find a range of resources on work and study here. “Back at work I handed over the urgent things (…) but at that moment work wasn’t my priority. I was thinking how I was going to tell my friends and family I had cancer. I was wondering if my partner and I would ever have an opportunity to start a family (…) Work was about to play a huge role in my treatment and recovery. My job that would give me […]

  • World first: Australia produces childhood cancer data set

    Cancer Australia has produced the world’s first national data on diagnosis and survival rates of childhood cancer. The data set analyses early diagnosis and survival rates for 16 of the most common types of childhood cancers. The data is based on figures collected between 2006 and 2010 by the Australian Childhood Cancer Registry from hospitals across the country. In collaboration with Cancer Council Queensland, Cancer Australia Developed a method to standardise the information, hoping that this may be replicated overseas in the future. About 100 Australian children die each year from cancer, making it the main cause of death from disease. […]

  • Paediatric Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This article from Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center in the US provides an overview of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). MDS is a rare disease that develops in the bone marrow. There are different types of MDS in children, and this article will tell you more about: What is myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)? What causes MDS? What are the different types of MDS? What are the symptoms of MDS? How do you diagnose MDS? How do you treat MDS in children? What is the prognosis for a child with MDS? What is the long-term outlook? What is the latest research on […]

  • One step closer to compulsory cancer education in UK

    Health education (including sex and relationship education) will become compulsory in the UK. According to a CoppaFeel press release this is one step closer to receiving compulsory cancer education. CoppaFeel is a UK breast cancer awareness charity. In their release, they explain: The guidance released today by the Department of Education shows great progress [showing]the need for pupils to be taught about not only the benefits of healthy eating and keeping fit (important factors to preventing cancer), but also the prevention of health problems and self examination. As we all know, preventing and detecting cancer early is vital in order to give […]

  • Ritchie’s story: Caring for a child with cancer and Down syndrome

    In January Ritchie Farrugia was told his six-year-old daughter Bella had Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia also known as ALL. Bella also has Down syndrome and at the time of diagnosis, Ritchie had already been her full-time carer for the last four years. Cancer Advisor spoke to him about being a dad in a children’s hospital ward and how Down syndrome affects cancer treatment. What’s it like being a dad in a children’s hospital ward? The first few months I stayed at the hospital full-time with Bella. My wife’s back is not too good, not that mine was great but, it was […]

Comments

Adry Awan

Stories like Ritchie’s and the Farrugia family’s are what makes a platform like Cancer Advisor so valuable in my opinion. Such an amazing, uplifting and inspirational read. Bravo to Ritchie for generously sharing his lived experience.

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