All Relevant to all cancers

  • Adult hospitals and treatment centres in Australia

    When it comes to hospital and treatment centres, teenagers and young people facing cancer have a unique set of needs. Where a young person is treated will most likely depend on their age. If you’re a young adult, you’ll go to an adult hospital. However, teenagers can be sent to either a children’s hospital or an adult facility. What hospital you go to may also depend on where you live or even what type of cancer you have. Not all hospitals offer cancer treatment, so you may have to travel, especially if you live in a regional or rural area. Some […]

  • Navigating finances – using insurance during cancer

    If you’re facing cancer, navigating insurance entitlements might not be on your radar. We’ve found some resources that could help you understand the various insurance entitlements out there and how you can access them. Have we missed something? If there is a finance question you need answered, please don’t hesitate to let us know and we will do what we can to answer it for you. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on finances and cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Cancer survivor and amputee’s cute Halloween costume

    The Mighty has shared a very cute story: titled 3-Year-Old Cancer Survivor Proves You Don’t Need Two Arms to Enjoy Halloween. The article is about Scarlette, a three-year-old amputee and cancer survivor. Scarlette and her mother Simone found a fun and creative way to celebrate Halloween. Simone says, “When she was born, which was four weeks early, her left arm was gigantic … It was about three times the size of her right arm. They had no idea what to make of it.” After many tests, Scarlette was diagnosed with undifferentiated high-grade spindle cell sarcoma, a rare type of cancer. “We did a […]

  • Tosh’s story: how he helped end his daughter’s cancer

    After more than two years of chemotherapy, Tosh Nagashima helped end his daughter’s cancer. Cancer Advisor called him to talk about his family’s experience. In March 2014 four-year-old Bella was diagnosed with high-risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL). After arriving at the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne in an ambulance, Bella started chemotherapy immediately. During treatment, Bella’s father continued to work full-time and take care of their youngest daughter Olivia while his wife Vanie spent day and night in the hospital. “After work I would visit Bella in the hospital every day,” he explains. “It was hard for her younger sister […]

  • Advice on friendship during your cancer journey

    This article Cancer and your friends from Redkite offers some advice around friendship during your cancer journey. Often young people find telling their friends about their cancer diagnosis particularly difficult. Even without cancer, people and relationships change – you may find that certain friendships change and new ones may emerge. Some ways to maintain friendships during this time include: Try to be honest and open with them if you can and lean on them when you need to Warn them you may be snappy or angry at times and ask them to forgive you if needed Ask them to keep inviting you […]

  • Advice for kids who have a friend with cancer

    If your child’s friend is diagnosed with cancer, you might be wondering how this could impact your child and what steps you can take to help them. We hope these resources have been helpful. If we’ve missed something, please let us know. We want to help you find what you’re looking for. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources with practical tips, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Angus’ story: Being a transgender childhood cancer survivor

    On the New Zealand website, Stuff, a transgender cancer survivor shares his story of his upcoming mastectomy. Angus Coleman was diagnosed with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) at just 16 months old. LCH is a rare type of cancer that can damage tissue or cause lesions to form in one or more places in the body. During his time with cancer, Angus had ongoing treatment from an endocrinologist which is now helping him take his next steps in his gender transition. “I was actually set up with an endocrinologist back when I was diagnosed with langerhans cell histiocytosis  [rare cancer]which is actually the doctor you need […]

  • Cancer survivor creates empathy cards

    Emily McDowell has created these empathy cards for people with serious illnesses. As a cancer survivor herself, Emily understands that sometimes people don’t know what to say to someone when they are diagnosed with cancer. “The most difficult part of my illness wasn’t losing my hair, or being erroneously called ‘sir’ by Starbucks baristas, or sickness from chemo. It was the loneliness and isolation I felt when many of my close friends and family members disappeared because they didn’t know what to say, or said the absolute wrong thing without realizing it.” – Emily McDowell These quirky empathy cards will […]

  • Children’s hospitals in Australia

    Children’s hospitals (also known as paediatric hospitals) specialise in the medical needs of children and teenagers. At children’s hospital the staff are specifically trained in taking care of children and teenagers. Chances are there will also be more child-geared activities on hand such as kids films and child entertainers. Expand the boxes below to learn more about children’s hospitals in each state. Some children’s hospitals do not treat children’s cancer, so you may need to move to a different state for treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for families who need to do this, including personal stories from […]

  • Leaving hospital

    When a child or young person finishes cancer treatment it can be a time of mixed emotions. Often this is a long anticipated event, and when it feels like they should be happy and celebrating, families may also feel anxious and overwhelmed. Leaving hospital and going home will be a different experience for each person, but Cancer Advisor has some resources on finishing treatment that may be useful. “Leaving hospital can be a scary time for a lot of families. They talk about leaving the safety net of the hospital, leaving their oncology family. Often losing this close support is the […]

  • Nerida’s story: Turning Brisbane gold for kids with cancer

    The 1st of September is our D-Day anniversary, so this year I decided to channel my energy into something positive. I turned Brisbane Gold. Brisbane City Hall, The Story Bridge and Victoria Bridge all shone gold for Childhood Cancer Awareness. This is how it happened: Receiving a diagnosis On the 1st September 2015 my Son Xavier was diagnosed with Stage III Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma of the bladder at just 23 months of age. We had to move to Brisbane from Townsville for treatment and as I knew very few people here, I started a Facebook support group page for the oncology […]

  • Nutrition tips for children during cancer treatment

    You’re probably aware that nutrition plays a huge part in a child’s overall health and wellbeing at any stage of their lives. However, did you know that nutrition may also help your child to better tolerate their cancer treatment, fight infection and assist with their recovery? Here’s what the experts have to say about the best way to approach nutrition during a child’s cancer treatment. Also, please go easy on yourself and remember that it’s okay to be flexible and cut corners while your child is in hospital. It won’t cause any harm if you serve Weet-bix for dinner or […]

  • Ritchie’s story: Caring for a child with cancer and Down syndrome

    In January Ritchie Farrugia was told his six-year-old daughter Bella had Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia also known as ALL. Bella also has Down syndrome and at the time of diagnosis, Ritchie had already been her full-time carer for the last four years. Cancer Advisor spoke to him about being a dad in a children’s hospital ward and how Down syndrome affects cancer treatment. What’s it like being a dad in a children’s hospital ward? The first few months I stayed at the hospital full-time with Bella. My wife’s back is not too good, not that mine was great but, it was […]

  • Cultural barriers in cancer treatment: Aboriginal communities

    VJOncology (The Video Journal of Oncolgoy) has created a video about the cultural barriers in cancer treatment in regards to Aboriginal communities. In this three minute video, Jasmine Micklem, PhD, of the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute talks with Roslyn Weetra, an Aboriginal Elder and cancer survivor. Even though this video was created in South Australia, Doctor Micklem talks about these barriers as a nationwide issue. She opens with, “We found across all of the states there are disparities, particularly around mortality.” She continues that Aboriginal people are diagnosed with cancer at the same rate as other Australians, however, […]

  • “Cancer anger”, explained by a therapist

    “Cancer anger” is a common experience for people facing cancer. In this Mighty article on cancer anger, therapist Karin Sieger explains: What is cancer anger? When does it happen? Who gets it? And what can you do about it?  “Cancer anger is a normal response to fear, despair and grief – a range of feelings which cancer brings into our lives. It can show as frustration, irritability, emotional withdrawal or aggression. You can feel it whether you have been diagnosed or you are a relative or friend. Cancer anger can happen at any stage of the illness, even years after treatment.” –  Karin Sieger Have you […]

  • Bereavement and grief

    Bereavement is the loss of someone through death, and grief is our response to loss. The grief that follows a young person’s death lasts a lifetime, and losing a child to cancer is one of the most devastating things that can happen to any family. When your child dies is a booklet from Redkite that uses the real experiences of bereaved parents to help other parents and carers following the death of their child.  It is important to remember that grief is personal and unique – everybody grieves differently and that’s okay. There will be a number of different factors that will […]

  • Bald Cartoons – free posters and profile pics

    Bald Cartoons is a Brazilian website featuring a range of famous cartoon characters with their heads shaved to help children with cancer not feel ‘different’. The website and heartwarming video below was created by cancer advocacy group GRAACC. The video shows the reactions of children when they see bald characters including Garfield, Hello Kitty and Snoopy. The website also allows families to print out posters or download social media profile pics. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on wellbeing, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Looking after yourself during cancer

    This page from Redkite gives an overview of how to take care of yourself physically and emotionally during your cancer journey. A large part of dealing with cancer is learning how to take care of yourself so that you are better prepared for challenges, but also ready to enjoy good things that come your way. Redkite offers tips on: Self-care Looking after your body Looking after your mind Having fun and taking risks Redkite provides a range of support services for young people with cancer including practical tips, financial assistance, and professional counselling. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources […]

  • Battle Weapons: A coping guide for young people with cancer

    Hi, my name is Nell and I’m the author of Battle Weapons: A coping guide for young people with cancer. I’m also a nurse and a cancer survivor. In high school, when we started the discussion about our future, my career advisor suggested nursing. This really appealed to me; to serve and support people at their most vulnerable is a great honour and privilege. Nursing is very diverse and I wasn’t sure for a long time where I wanted to take it, until I was diagnosed with cancer. I know my life’s purpose is to help those with cancer, particularly young people. […]

  • Vlog series by a young adult cancer survivor

    Steph is a 23-year-old outdoor education graduate living in Brisbane. In 2012, Steph told her cancer story as part of Redkite’s partnership with JimmyTeens. Part one: Meet Steph In this first video, Steph talks about how she decided to manage her fertility, what chemotherapy was like, how her friends and family took the news of her cancer diagnosis, and more. “I’m doing this video to help anyone out there in the same boat as me,” she says. Part two: The halfway point As Steph passes the halfway point in her treatment, she talks about how her attitude has changed, why she […]