• Nausea and vomiting during cancer treatment: a video

    EviQ Education, a program of the Cancer Institute New South Wales, has created a video about nausea and vomiting during cancer treatment. The video was made for adults but it could also be useful in regards to children experiencing nausea and vomiting during cancer treatment. The video discusses: What it is Why it happens When you should call your doctor or nurse What you can do to reduce the risk of it happening The video features Associate Professor and Medical Oncologist, Craig Lewis as well as interviews with a cancer survivor about how they managed their nausea and vomiting. Cancer Advisor Read more [...]

  • National Carers Week 2018

    It’s National Carers Week – a time to celebrate and recognise the 2.7 million unpaid Australian carers. Carers not only contribute to our community but they make a huge impact on our national economy. In fact, according to the National Carers Week website, “Should all carers decide to stop performing their caring role, it would cost the country $60.3 billion per year to replace those supports – that’s over $1 billion per week.” National Carers Week provides a chance to show your appreciation and learn about carers and caring in Australia. You can get involved in the various events happening this week, or read Read more [...]

  • Support for grandparents of kids with cancer

    Grandparents of Kids with Cancer is a web page which offers support for grandparents around the world, giving them a place to share their experiences with other people who have a grandchild with cancer. They advocate for the important role that grandparents play in the family, and acknowledge the emotional and practical needs of grandparents. On the website they say, “Being told that your grandchild has cancer is devastating. Not only is your grandchild going through the most traumatic experience, but your own child is also facing the worst pain imaginable. Talking to other grandparents who are going through the Read more [...]

  • Caring for a son with cancer

    This New York Times documentary follows the story of Regina Hensley and her son Andrew as he fights an aggressive form of cancer, Ewing’s Sarcoma. For years, Regina Hensley struggled with addiction, even once attempting suicide. When her son Andrew was born, he gave her a reason to live. But when he received his diagnosis at 13 years old, Regina had to search for meaning once again. ‘Without Andrew, I can’t imagine what life would be about.’ -Regina Hensley In response to the documentary, the Times received almost 100 responses from parents who were caring for a sick child. Cancer Advisor Read more [...]

  • Keeping your child healthy during cancer remission

    This factsheet from US website familydoctor.org offers some information and tips for parents when their child finishes treatment. Whether your child is in partial or complete remission, you may have questions like ‘what do I do next?’ and fears like ‘what if the cancer comes back?’ This article covers some topics including: Nutrition and exercise, Keeping records of your child’s treatment, and Late effects. To end this resources suggests Questions to ask your doctor such as: What kinds of symptoms should I look for that mean I should call you? What doctors should my child see now that the cancer is Read more [...]

  • When to call the hospital

    As a parent of a child with cancer you might be wondering when to call the hospital. The Paediatric Integrated Cancer Service (PICS) has put together a handy one-page factsheet that you can print out and put on your fridge. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources with tips and hints, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Our Cancer Journey: Team Bella – Never give up!

    In March of 2014, our family was thrown onto the oncology roller coaster when Bella (aged four), was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (high risk). She would complete two and half years of chemotherapy bringing her into remission. Unfortunately, Bella relapsed in March 2017, eight months post treatment.     Bella would endure another eight months of intense treatment (including more intense chemotherapy followed by two bone marrow transplants). During her treatment, as her mum, carer and advocate, I decided to document her arduous journey. To provide awareness about childhood cancer and in doing so, provide hope, comfort and inspiration Read more [...]

  • Gather My Crew: coordinate help in tough times

    Gather My Crew connects people facing cancer to their community of friends and family. The online tools allows them to ask for, and receive, the practical support they actually need such as meals, transport, help with the kids and more. This can help coordinate help in tough times. How it works Our easy-to-use technology lets Gatherers (those coordinating the support) choose the help required from our comprehensive list and encourages Crew Members (friends, family, neighbours) to choose how they can help. Getting started with Gather My Crew is as simple as:  Step 1. Choose the help needed. Step 2. Invite Crew Members to lend a hand. This can Read more [...]

  • Caring for yourself when you’re a carer

    Caring for yourself  by the Cancer Council Victoria offers information on self-care when you are also a carer. Topics include: Looking after yourself, keeping healthy, asking others for help, ways to cope, taking a break, and working while caring. For further reading, Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on self-care. Or, if you have any questions that need answering or specific content you want to see, please let us know on our Feedback and Contact. We want to help you find what you’re looking for. Before you go We’d love you to share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Read more [...]

  • Children’s Cancer Foundation

    The Children’s Cancer Foundation has supported children with cancer since 1992. We fund clinical research, clinical care and provide family support to ensure the highest standards of diagnosis, treatment and support for both child and family. While our focus is largely research based, we believe that it is the little things – a child’s access to art and music therapy – that can significantly help a child on their cancer journey. We strive for better and less harmful treatments and believe that every child should laugh, dance, play and live as only a child can. Family Connect The Children’s Cancer Foundation Read more [...]

  • Tips for telling a kid they have cancer

    A paediatric cancer specialist shares their tips for telling a kid they have cancer. For more information, Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on diagnosis. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • 7 resources for relationship wellbeing for young people

    ­­Valentine’s Day is almost here, which means it’s hard to escape the roses and hearts all over social media, and shop windows. If you’re dealing with cancer right now, romance may not be top of your agenda. However, love and sex are important parts of life, and there are ways to keep the spark alive through tough times. Whether you’re a young adult thinking about starting a sexual relationship or a teenager whose partner has a diagnosis, we’ve found a range of resources to help keep your intimate and romantic relationships in good shape. 1 Title: A Guide to Supporting Read more [...]

  • CancerAid – a free app for cancer management

    CancerAid is a free app where you can find personalised cancer information. You can also store your medical records, results and specialist’s details in a single location. The app is available on iTunes and Google Play. In this demo video, you can see how CancerAid works to empower cancer patients and those who care for them. Diagnosis in particular can be a difficult time for many patients and their family. It is common to experience feelings of isolation and overwhelm at this time. By keeping all your cancer information in one place, CancerAid can help you feel more in control of your Read more [...]

  • Caring for a cancer survivor – Tips for coping

    Caring for a cancer survivor – Tips for coping is a factsheet from the Australian Cancer Survivorship Centre and the Peter MacCullum Cancer Centre. This four-page PDF covers topics such as: Does the caring role end once treatment is over? Getting back to ‘normal’ Common feelings Learning to cope with your feelings Fear of the cancer coming back Coping with practical issues (work, finances and home) Caring for yourself Staying fit and healthy Preparing for the days ahead “Being a carer for someone with cancer can be a rewarding and special experience,” the factsheet explains. “However, it may also be Read more [...]

  • Pain Factsheet from Sydney Children’s Hospital Network

    This factsheet from the Sydney Children’s Hospital Network helps parents of small children identify if their child is in pain. Many things affect a child’s experience of pain, including: Their age Their beliefs and understanding of what is causing the pain Their beliefs in their own ability to cope Their previous pain experiences and how they have seen other people dealing with pain How they have learned to respond to pain Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on pain management but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Grandparents, Aunties, Uncles, Friends – Your support is invaluable

    Some parents have suggested that rather than just saying ‘If there’s anything I can do, let me know’, it’s more useful to think about what would truly be helpful and do it. Some great ideas include: cooking meals that can be frozen and bringing them to the hospital or home so a healthy meal is always available offering to spend time with the child so both parents can go out together and have a break doing laundry during hospital stays helping with home and garden upkeep while the family are away in hospital accompanying parents on clinic days as they Read more [...]

  • Managing pain during cancer

    This content is not a substitute for medical advice. Please consult with your doctor or other health professional to make sure this information is right for you. US website Cancer.Net has a range of resources for young adults with cancer, including pain management information. Many patients and survivors experience pain during and after cancer treatment. It may help to know that cancer pain can be treated successfully for most patients. But it is important to focus on managing pain during all phases of cancer treatment and into survivorship. This website offers information on the following topics: Pain: Causes and Diagnosis Read more [...]

  • Advice for grandparents and relatives during a child’s diagnosis

    Cancer Australia offers advice advice for grandparents and relatives dealing with their family member’s cancer diagnosis. Cancer Advisor has a range of information for grandparents, or if you have any questions that need answering or specific content you want to see, please let us know on our Feedback and Contact. We want to help you find what you’re looking for. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer.

  • A guide for grandparents of children with cancer

    Redkite’s 36-page information booklet helps grandparents of children with cancer. Redkite spoke extensively with grandparents to understand their experiences. This booklet answers some of the many questions which grandparents of children with cancer told Redkite they would have liked answered when their grandchild was diagnosed and during their grandchild’s treatment phase. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for grandparents, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.