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    Lumber puncture and bone marrow aspirate

    The Hush Foundation and the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne has produced a 12-minute video for children undergoing procedures such as lumber puncture and bone marrow aspirate. The video covers: Feeling worried; What are procedures such as lumber puncture and bone marrow aspirate; How to get ready for these procedures; Going under anaesthetic; and Waking up after the procedure. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for parents of children with cancer, but we are always looking for more content. Register now to contribute content, recommend a resource, or share your personal story.

  • Discussing your child’s cancer over social media

    If you’re a parent, you may be wondering how to talk about your child’s cancer over social media. The Paediatric Integrated Cancer Service (PICS) has created a factsheet to help you carefully use social media websites and emails to share and discuss your child’s cancer information. On the website it says: “Responsible use of social media by parents and, more so, teenagers, is critical to safeguard your family’s privacy regarding personal information and information about your child’s cancer diagnosis and treatment. There are potential risks and dangers that may not be apparent at present but may prove harmful later on in Read more [...]

  • Bone tumours in children and teenagers

    Cancer Australia gives an overview of bone tumours in children and teenagers. The web page says, “Bone tumours occur when abnormal cells in the bones grow in an uncontrolled way. There are 2 main types of bone tumours in children: Osteosarcoma forms from cells called osteoblasts. It usually develops at the ends of the long bones, such as the arms or legs. Ewing sarcoma (also called Ewing family of tumours) forms from a type of stem cell in the bone marrow. It can form in the bones of the arms, legs, hands, feet, spine, skull, ribs, shoulder blades or hips. Ewing sarcomas can also Read more [...]

  • Helping a child to understand cancer

    The US website Cancer.Net offers advice to help a child understand cancer. They say: “For most parents, few things are as frightening as hearing from the doctor that your child has cancer. Parents are dealing with their own fears and confusion at this time. Yet, they must also face the task of helping their child understand his or her diagnosis.” It suggests what to tell your child based on their age and is broken up into age-appropriate sections including: aged 0-3, aged 3-7, aged 7-12, and teenagers. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for parents of children with cancer, but we Read more [...]

  • Help for brothers and sisters – a video for kids

    When it comes to childhood cancer, brothers and sisters of a diagnosed child have specific needs. In fact, many “well” siblings will report feeling alone, lost and neglected. While there are various materials available that have been specifically written for parents to help address these needs, we’ve found a resource that is specifically geared to kids themselves – both the diagnosed and the well sibling! The Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation in the U.S. created this fun and educational video as a way to emotionally support siblings of kids with cancer. The video is part of the Imaginary Friend Society series and was Read more [...]

  • Keeping your child healthy during cancer remission

    This factsheet from US website familydoctor.org offers some information and tips for parents when their child finishes treatment. Whether your child is in partial or complete remission, you may have questions like ‘what do I do next?’ and fears like ‘what if the cancer comes back?’ This article covers some topics including: Nutrition and exercise, Keeping records of your child’s treatment, and Late effects. To end this resources suggests Questions to ask your doctor such as: What kinds of symptoms should I look for that mean I should call you? What doctors should my child see now that the cancer is Read more [...]

  • Kids meet and interview a kid with cancer

    HiHo Kids has created a sweet and amusing video called “Kids Meet a Kid With Cancer” featuring Kira, an 8-year-old cancer survivor. HiHo Kids is a humorous YouTube channel created in Seattle that features a series of interviews with a cast of diverse American kids. These unscripted videos are broken off into topics such as: Kids Meet – the kids meet different types of people such a magician, deaf person or little person; Kids Try – the kids are given various foods to sample from across the globe; and Kids Describe – the kids describe things like their parents, love Read more [...]

  • Bald Cartoons – free posters and profile pics

    Bald Cartoons is a Brazilian website featuring a range of famous cartoon characters with their heads shaved to help children with cancer not feel ‘different’. The website and heartwarming video below was created by cancer advocacy group GRAACC. The video shows the reactions of children when they see bald characters including Garfield, Hello Kitty and Snoopy. The website also allows families to print out posters or download social media profile pics. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on wellbeing, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Unravel Pediatric cancer … until there is a cure

    Unravel Pediatric Cancer is a US based not-for-profit organisation working to spread knowledge about the realities of childhood cancer. They raise funds to: support research that investigates the causes and mechanisms of paediatric cancer; develop more effective and less toxic treatments; and find a cure. Unravel has produced an infographic to articulate their mission and show some statistics about childhood cancer in the United States.    After her daughter was diagnosed with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), Libby Kranz co-founded Unravel. DIPG is a type of brain cancer which doesn’t respond to chemotherapy and is terminal. She recalls: Her doctor Read more [...]

  • Kids Kicking Cancer: martial arts therapy

    Kids Kicking Cancer is a not-for-profit organisation that teaches the mind-body techniques of Martial Arts instruction, breath work and meditation to empower children beyond the pain and discomfort of disease. Kids Kicking Cancer now offers help and services to not only cancer patients, but any child in pain from a serious illness. They currently operate the Heroes’ Circle program in America, Canada, Israel and Italy and support ill children and their siblings aged 3-23 years old. Using martial arts therapy, Kids Kicking Cancer staff teaches ill children and their siblings to: Regain a sense of control over the chaos of their Read more [...]

  • “It was don’t give up from the beginning” – Eden’s story

    In 2015, 10-year-old Eden was diagnosed with a rare cancer. In this podcast and video, the Texas Children’s Cancer Center interview Eden and her family about her diagnosis, treatment plan and becoming cancer-free. After waking up with throbbing painful bump on her leg, her family started investigating what it could be. Her parents were carrying her because she couldn’t walk. “She was continuing to decline and the pain was getting worse,” her mother explains on the video. “I moved into that mommy mode where I need to be strong for my child.” “When we found out she was diagnosed with a Read more [...]

  • “What is cancer?” – video for kids

    The Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation has created a fun and educational video for kids called What is Cancer? Imaginary friends Captain Beakbeard and his first mate Quincy (a squawking human) introduce concepts such as healthy versus unhealthy cells, and cancer treatment. This video is part of the Imaginary Friend Society series of animation videos. Cancer Advisor has a range of content for parents with a child with cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Imaginary Friend Society – explaining cancer to kids

    Imaginary Friend Society is a series of animation videos that explains cancer to kids in a sensitive and fun way. The series was created by the Paediatric Brain Foundation and covers both the medical and emotional aspects of cancer in an effort to make children more comfortable while facing cancer. Some of the videos include topics such as: Finding out you have cancer Why am I tired all the time? How to handle shots Returning to school Being scared Long hospital stays Blood transfusions, and Feeling sad.   Cancer Advisor has a range of resources to help parents of a child Read more [...]

  • Our Cancer Journey: Team Bella – Never give up!

    In March of 2014, our family was thrown onto the oncology roller coaster when Bella (aged four), was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (high risk). She would complete two and half years of chemotherapy bringing her into remission. Unfortunately, Bella relapsed in March 2017, eight months post treatment.     Bella would endure another eight months of intense treatment (including more intense chemotherapy followed by two bone marrow transplants). During her treatment, as her mum, carer and advocate, I decided to document her arduous journey. To provide awareness about childhood cancer and in doing so, provide hope, comfort and inspiration Read more [...]

  • Weightlifting at nine year’s old – Ryan’s story

    OnUS blog 2Surviveonline a cancer survivor called Ryan discusses how weightlifting at nine year’s old helped him through cancer. He says, “When I was a kid, I was extremely small from cancer treatment. Chemotherapy made it where I could not really eat so well (shocker). Then there was that whole puking thing that I’m sure many of you survivors know about. But enough of the whining.” Ryan’s grandfather said he would give him a dollar for every pound he put on. Go to his blog to find out more. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal stories, but we’re always looking Read more [...]

  • Children’s Cancer Foundation – Clinical Trials and Research

    Since 1992 the Children’s Cancer Foundation has invested more than $47 million in clinical research, clinical trials, clinical care and family support. The Foundation has currently allocated research funding to clinical trials across 27 projects up until 2023. The Children’s Cancer Foundation funds an extensive program of clinical research and clinical trials for all paediatric cancer types – these are key to developing new and kinder treatments with decreased side effects. Currently funded programs include ‘Paediatric Precision Medicine’, ‘Molecular Diagnostics’ and an ‘Immunotherapy clinical trial’. Notable Projects • Clinical trial to investigate the effects of light therapy on the quality of sleep, Read more [...]

  • Hearts for Eva – Sharleigh’s story

    ABC online has published a 6-min documentary and personal story by bereaved mother Sharleigh Stevenson about her daughter Eva. This touching video also features comments by Gerald Purchase, a clinical psychologist as well as footage and interviews with Eva herself. At four-years-old Eva was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma. Sharleigh was told there was no cure. They lived in Victorian regional town called Sunraysia. A local man called John Burfitt held a fundraiser called “Hearts for Eva” to raise money for Eva’s cancer treatment. Hearts for Eva became a global phenomenon. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on end of life, but we’re Read more [...]

  • Tips for telling a kid they have cancer

    A paediatric cancer specialist shares their tips for telling a kid they have cancer. For more information, Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on diagnosis. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • “I draw childhood cancer” – Cartoons by Angus

    I Draw Childhood Cancer is a Facebook page by talented artist Angus Olsen. His daughter Jane was diagnosed with Embryonic Rhabdomyosarcoma at 3 years old. Ever since he has created various works communicating the experience of having a child with cancer. He also draws other children from all across the world in ways that show their strength and beauty. On his Facebook page he writes: In 2016 our 2yo daughter was diagnosed with RMS cancer. In the nightmare I drew and it helped me. Now I draw childhood cancer and it somehow helps others. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal Read more [...]

  • How play can help children cope with stress in hospital

    Did you know that play can help children cope with stress in hospital? According to child life specialist Professor Deborah Vilas play is a valuable resource to help cancer patients deal with their stress and anxiety while in hospital. If you are after more resources on childhood anxiety, take a look at our wellbeing section. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.