• Neuroblastoma staging

    Cancer Australia’s factsheet provides an overview of neuroblastoma staging and the symptoms and treatment that can be experienced. It covers topics such as risk factors for the disease, how diagnosis is made, and what support services are available. Diagnostic tests will also help indicate the stage of the tumour. Staging determines where the tumour is, how large it is, which nearby organs are involved, and whether the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. This will be important for the treatment team to assess the best options, and to determine the prognosis for your child. See below for a Read more [...]

  • Soft tissue sarcoma

    This web page from Cancer Australia gives an overview of soft tissue sarcomas, and where they can develop. It also provides information about risk factors, symptoms, and different aspects of the cancer experience. Follow the links below to read more on each topic, or browse our other resources on soft tissue sarcomas for more information. You can also look at our phases of the cancer journey page to find information specific to diagnosis, treatment, or life after cancer. Risk factors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Support The cells of connective tissues – such as muscles, fat, blood vessels and lining of joints Read more [...]

  • Questions to ask your doctor at diagnosis

    The Cancer Council has created a list of questions you might like to ask your doctor and treating team about your diagnosis, treatment and clinical trials. On the website it says: “When cancer is diagnosed you enter into a partnership with your doctor and other health care professionals. To help you get the best care you have the right to: ask questions be specifically informed about the details of your care make an informed choice of treatment from the options available to you It is important to ask questions, especially if you are unsure or unclear and feel you need Read more [...]

  • Children’s hospitals in Australia

    Children’s hospitals (also known as paediatric hospitals) specialise in the medical needs of children and teenagers. At children’s hospital the staff are specifically trained in taking care of children and teenagers. Chances are there will also be more child-geared activities on hand such as kids films and child entertainers. Expand the boxes below to learn more about children’s hospitals in each state. Some children’s hospitals do not treat children’s cancer, so you may need to move to a different state for treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for families who need to do this, including personal stories from Read more [...]

  • World first: Australia produces childhood cancer data set

    Cancer Australia has produced the world’s first national data on diagnosis and survival rates of childhood cancer. The data set analyses early diagnosis and survival rates for 16 of the most common types of childhood cancers. The data is based on figures collected between 2006 and 2010 by the Australian Childhood Cancer Registry from hospitals across the country. In collaboration with Cancer Council Queensland, Cancer Australia Developed a method to standardise the information, hoping that this may be replicated overseas in the future. About 100 Australian children die each year from cancer, making it the main cause of death from disease. Read more [...]

  • Ellie Douglas – Cancer Q&A

    Ellie was 17 when she was diagnosed with hodgkin lymphoma 2a. In her first YouTube video, she answers some questions about her diagnosis and treatment and how she is feeling. In particular, she talks about losing her hair. This happened within 15 days of her first chemotherapy treatment, and Ellie expresses that she actually felt relieved. The uncertainty about when it would happen, how much hair she would lose, whether she would lose it all at once; these questions made her feel anxious, so she was relieved when it finally happened.   When a subscriber asked her how to help Read more [...]

  • Germ cell tumours overview

    This overview of germ cell tumours is by Cancer Australia, and provides information about the symptoms that might be experienced, as well as information about different treatments that may be used. Germ cell tumours occur when abnormal germ cells grow in an uncontrolled way. A germ cell is the type of cell that develops into eggs (in the ovaries) or sperm (in the testicles). Germ cell tumours can develop before or after birth, and can occur in the ovaries or testicles, or in other parts of the body. This is because sometimes, when babies are developing in the womb, germ Read more [...]

  • Liver tumours in children

    Like all cancers, liver tumours occur when abnormal cells grow in an uncontrolled way. In this article from Cancer Australia you can read about the different types of liver tumours that can develop in children, including: Hepatoblastoma usually occurs in children under 3 years of age and does not usually spread to other parts of the body. Hepatocellular carcinoma usually occurs in older children and teenagers, and often spreads to other parts of the body. Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver usually occurs in children aged 5–10, and often spreads throughout the liver or to the lungs. Infantile choriocarcinoma starts in the developing baby and Read more [...]