• Nausea and vomiting during cancer treatment: a video

    EviQ Education, a program of the Cancer Institute New South Wales, has created a video about nausea and vomiting during cancer treatment. The video was made for adults but it could also be useful in regards to children experiencing nausea and vomiting during cancer treatment. The video discusses: What it is Why it happens When you should call your doctor or nurse What you can do to reduce the risk of it happening The video features Associate Professor and Medical Oncologist, Craig Lewis as well as interviews with a cancer survivor about how they managed their nausea and vomiting. Cancer Advisor Read more [...]

  • Cancer vs VR

    US startup OnComfort is using virtual reality tools to reduce anxiety in cancer patients. Their apps have been shown to reduce stress, anxiety, and even the need for pain medication. The five apps use a variety of techniques to achieve this, you can learn more via these links: Aqua – an immersive experience that reduces pain and anxiety by inducing relaxation in an undersea environment AMO – an experience that uses clinical hypnosis techniques to ease pain and anxiety while a patient undergoes a short invasive procedure KIMO – for use in paediatrics, KIMO distracts and empowers patients by enabling them to fight Read more [...]

  • Cancer survivor creates empathy cards

    Emily McDowell has created these empathy cards for people with serious illnesses. As a cancer survivor herself, Emily understands that sometimes people don’t know what to say to someone when they are diagnosed with cancer. “The most difficult part of my illness wasn’t losing my hair, or being erroneously called ‘sir’ by Starbucks baristas, or sickness from chemo. It was the loneliness and isolation I felt when many of my close friends and family members disappeared because they didn’t know what to say, or said the absolute wrong thing without realizing it.” – Emily McDowell These quirky empathy cards will Read more [...]

  • Supporting sleep in young cancer patients

    Sleeping difficulties are common among children and adolescents, and cancer patients are no exception. In fact, children with cancer are especially susceptible to difficult sleep and need particular support to get the rest needed for health and recovery. Why Sleep is Difficult for Young People With Cancer Whether in a hospital setting or undergoing treatment at home, young people with cancer may experience disturbed sleep due to environmental conditions, side effects, and schedules. In a hospital setting, young cancer patients may be disturbed by environmental conditions, including sounds and lights throughout the night (and daytime, if napping). Disruptions from medical Read more [...]

  • Leaving hospital

    When a child or young person finishes cancer treatment it can be a time of mixed emotions. Often this is a long anticipated event, and when it feels like they should be happy and celebrating, families may also feel anxious and overwhelmed. Leaving hospital and going home will be a different experience for each person, but Cancer Advisor has some resources on finishing treatment that may be useful. “Leaving hospital can be a scary time for a lot of families. They talk about leaving the safety net of the hospital, leaving their oncology family. Often losing this close support is the Read more [...]

  • Total body irradiation

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is the term used when radiotherapy is given to the whole body. Radiotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses high energy rays, similar to x-rays. TBI may be used in conjunction with high dose chemotherapy drugs. This is often used in preparation for a stem cell or bone marrow transplant.  This fact sheet from the Paediatric Integrated Cancer Service (PICS) provides information on total body irradiation. The resource gives an overview of: What is total body irradiation? Getting ready for total body irradiation What is it like? Taking care of your child during total body Read more [...]

  • Financial checkups after childhood cancer

    Childhood cancer survivors need financial checkups as adults. The US website Marketwatch explains that in addition to health checkups, cancer survivors will need financial checkups post treatment too. The article referenced a study published by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in New York City. The study included almost 3,000 long-term paediatric cancer survivors aged between 18 and 65. “More than half said they were worried about paying for care and one-third said finances kept them from seeking medical care. (They were, on average, 23 years from their diagnosis and all had been treated at St. Jude.)”     Beyond the impact that Read more [...]

  • Sarcoma survivor advocates for sarcoma awareness

    Dominique Schell is a sarcoma survivor. In her TEDx talk, the 20 year old shares her personal experience of childhood cancer. In this speech, she talks about how as a survivor she feels an obligation to advocate for all the children who die of sarcoma each year. Schell was diagnosed with osteosarcoma at 10 years old, and in the 10 years following had many complications as the result of her initial surgery. She had eight chemotherapy sessions each lasting a week, which she describes as hell. Her side effects included weight loss, cravings, exhaustion, vomiting and hair loss. She says Read more [...]

  • Advice and information on fatigue caused by brain tumours

    Fatigue can be a challenging side effect of brain tumours. If you have a brain tumour you may be wondering about how you can navigate this side effect. This factsheet from UK organisation The Brain Tumour Charity provides information and practical suggestions for coping with the emotional and physical aspects of fatigue caused by brain tumours. To open the factsheet explains: “Fatigue is often described as a persistent feeling of being tired, weak, worn out, slow or heavy. It is a common symptom for people with all types and grades of brain tumour. Cancer-related fatigue is often talked about, but less acknowledged Read more [...]

  • Keeping your child healthy during cancer remission

    This factsheet from US website familydoctor.org offers some information and tips for parents when their child finishes treatment. Whether your child is in partial or complete remission, you may have questions like ‘what do I do next?’ and fears like ‘what if the cancer comes back?’ This article covers some topics including: Nutrition and exercise, Keeping records of your child’s treatment, and Late effects. To end this resources suggests Questions to ask your doctor such as: What kinds of symptoms should I look for that mean I should call you? What doctors should my child see now that the cancer is Read more [...]

  • ONTrac at Peter Mac

    The ONTrac at Peter Mac Cancer Service is located at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Victoria, Australia. Their multidisciplinary team of health professionals works together to ensure that young people are supported before, during and after their cancer treatment. This web page includes information on clinical services for young people like: diagnosis and disease management, palliative and survivorship care, general adolescent health, emotional and mental health concerns, fertility and sexual health, physical and nutritional wellbeing, school and vocation support, and family-focused treatments. The service also provides : Secondary consultation service, Professional development, education and training, research and data collection program, Read more [...]

  • Rare Cancers Australia – KnowledgeBase Patient Support Program

    Rare Cancers Australia has developed the KnowledgeBase as a part of their Patient Support Program aimed at providing patients with a centre of knowledge, guidance, advice and hope. The web page includes a wide range of resources including directories for: Cancer Types Cancer Services Health Professionals Support Services Clinical Trials  Childhood cancers are, by definition, rare or less common (RLC) cancers. There are over 200 different types of RLC cancers, so navigating services and treatment can be difficult for patients and their families. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on rare cancers, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave Read more [...]

  • How your general practice team can support you

    This fact sheet from the Australian Cancer Survivorship Centre (ACSC) offers information about involving your general practice team in your healthcare following cancer treatment. It offers some key insights and tips: • Your GP is the cornerstone of your healthcare. • Make a long appointment with your GP to develop an after treatment health plan. • Your GP and GPN are well placed to help you manage the effects of cancer treatment. • Your GP and GPN can support you to make healthy lifestyle choices. • Lifestyle changes may help reduce the risk of cancer coming back, and help you Read more [...]

  • Adult sleep problems after childhood cancer

    The American Association of the Advancement of Science has reported that childhood cancer survivors are more likely to experience sleep problems as adults. “Results show that cancer survivors were more likely than siblings to report sleep problems as adults … survivors were 31 percent more likely to report daytime sleepiness and 26 percent more likely to have poor ‘sleep efficiency,’.” The study involved nearly 2000 childhood cancer survivors. “Participants had a mean age of 35 years and a mean time since diagnosis of 23.5 years. The study also involved 380 siblings with a mean age of 33 years.” Cancer Advisor has Read more [...]

  • Understanding changes in thinking and memory

    Understanding changes in thinking and memory is a 3-page factsheet by the Cancer Council. This factsheet covers areas such as: What is cancer-related cognitive impairment? How can thinking and memory be affected? What causes cognitive changes? Who is affected? How long does it last? Effect on your emotional wellbeing Managing thinking and memory changes What is cognitive rehabilitation? Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on the effects of cancer treatment, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Tips for facing post-treatment side effects

    In this 2Survive blog post, childhood cancer survivor Ryan offers tips for facing post-treatment side effects including: Know Your Drugs Be Ready Follow Up Be A Jerk Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on life after cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Cancer treatment for teens and young adults

    This factsheet from Redkite gives an overview on cancer treatment for teens and young adults including: types of cancer treatment, complementary therapy and cancer, clinical trials, side effects, and sticking with treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on cancer treatment, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource. Join our community Cancer Advisor is an online platform with a wide range of cancer advice and knowledge. We provide information for families of children and young people with cancer. You’ll be directed to external websites and sources featuring reliable information Read more [...]

  • Childhood cancer and adult obesity

    Obesity puts anyone at a higher risk for many different diseases and conditions, including heart disease and cancer. However, survivors of childhood cancer who become overweight or obese as adults are at an increased risk of developing an obesity-related cancer. If these survivors were obese as children and carry that obesity into adulthood, they are at even higher risk. Obesity is a condition in which a person has an unhealthy amount and/or distribution of body fat.  Higher amounts of body fat cause chronic inflammation in the body, which has the potential to damage our DNA, and in turn, cause cancer. You Read more [...]

  • Managing chemo brain after childhood cancer

    The article Managing chemo brain after childhood cancer discusses the late effects following chemotherapy in pediatric survivors. It focuses on open communication with the child’s school and highlights some techniques that can be used to keep a young person’s brain active. Before you go We’d love you to share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Your unique experience could really help others in need. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • Teen Girl Living With Cancer – Ellie’s Story

    Teen Girl Living with Cancer is a personal blog by childhood cancer advocate, Ellie. You can also follow her on YouTube, Instagram and Facebook. At 14 years old Ellie was diagnosed with a rare childhood cancer called Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma. “It totally flipped my life upside down but now I can use all the horrible experiences I had to inspire and advise you guys.” At the time of writing, her Instagram and Facebook pages were the most up-to-date. On her instagram she says: NED since 22/01/16. I’m in remission. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, Read more [...]