Tag: effects of cancer treatment

  • Cancer survivor creates empathy cards

    Emily McDowell has created these empathy cards for people with serious illnesses. As a cancer survivor herself, Emily understands that sometimes people don’t know what to say to someone when they are diagnosed with cancer. “The most difficult part of my illness wasn’t losing my hair, or being erroneously called ‘sir’ by Starbucks baristas, or sickness from chemo. It was the loneliness and isolation I felt when many of my close friends and family members disappeared because they didn’t know what to say, or said the absolute wrong thing without realizing it.” – Emily McDowell These quirky empathy cards will […]

  • Leaving hospital

    When a child or young person finishes cancer treatment it can be a time of mixed emotions. Often this is a long anticipated event, and when it feels like they should be happy and celebrating, families may also feel anxious and overwhelmed. Leaving hospital and going home will be a different experience for each person, but Cancer Advisor has some resources on finishing treatment that may be useful. “Leaving hospital can be a scary time for a lot of families. They talk about leaving the safety net of the hospital, leaving their oncology family. Often losing this close support is the […]

  • Cancer treatment for teens and young adults

    This factsheet from Redkite gives an overview on cancer treatment for teens and young adults including: types of cancer treatment, complementary therapy and cancer, clinical trials, side effects, and sticking with treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on cancer treatment, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource. Join our community Cancer Advisor is an online platform with a wide range of cancer advice and knowledge. We provide information for families of children and young people with cancer. You’ll be directed to external websites and sources featuring reliable information […]

  • Teen Girl Living With Cancer – Ellie’s Story

    Teen Girl Living with Cancer is a personal blog by childhood cancer advocate, Ellie. You can also follow her on YouTube, Instagram and Facebook. At 14 years old Ellie was diagnosed with a rare childhood cancer called Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma. “It totally flipped my life upside down but now I can use all the horrible experiences I had to inspire and advise you guys.” At the time of writing, her Instagram and Facebook pages were the most up-to-date. On her instagram she says: NED since 22/01/16. I’m in remission. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, […]

  • Mouth care

    Looking after your mouth is important, especially when you have cancer. This article from Cancer Research UK covers some common mouth problems and how to cope with them. Mouth care is needed during cancer treatment, if you’re at risk of infections, and if you’re not eating and drinking normally. Proper mouth care will keep your mouth very clean and moist. Common complaints of mouth problems from people with cancer are: Dry mouth Bad breath Changes to taste Mouth sores and infection The article has more information about each of these problems, as well as how to prevent or treat them. […]

  • How to prevent getting mouth sores

    Parents have shared that using the child toothpaste and the softest toothbrush you can get can help prevent getting mouth ulcers during chemo treatment. Do you have any other tips to prevent or help with mouth ulcers? Share them in the comments below.

  • Mouth care

    Factsheet on mouth care and how to take care of your child’s teeth and mouth during chemotherapy or a bone marrow transplant from the Paediatric Integrated Cancer Service (PICS).

  • Fertility and cancer treatment

    Redkite have information for parents and young people about cancer treatment and how this might affect fertility. Getting information about fertility and treatment Support through awkward discussions What if treatment has already started? Cancer treatment can affect fertility and it is important to have discussions with your treatment team about what your options are. During treatment this may not seem like a priority, but decisions made early on can have long-term effects so it is important to find out about fertility as early as possible. For some families it may be uncomfortable to have discussions about sex and fertility. Unfortunately, many […]