Tag: family

  • For young adults – cancer and your family

    If you’re a young person diagnosed with cancer you probably have lots of questions about how it will affect your family. While every family is different and has its own strengths and quirks, it may be helpful to consider some common questions. Click on a section below to see some tips and hints, as well as recommendations for further reading. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for young people facing cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Clinical trials bring hope – Lesley and Casey’s story

    On the Dell’s Children website, a mother and father share their story about how clinical trials brought hope to their family during their son’s cancer treatment. Rex was 17 months old when he was diagnosed with high-risk neuroblastoma. The article says: “Upon Rex’s diagnosis, Lesley and her husband, Casey, knew their family faced a long, uphill battle.  High-risk neuroblastoma is an aggressive and deadly form of childhood cancer, and the odds for survival were not in their child’s favor.  They agreed to enroll Rex into a clinical trial study using an experimental drug, Unituxin, for children with high-risk neuroblastoma.” In this […]

  • Childhood cancer: Reflections from a sister

    In this short video from the American Cancer Society, Sophie opens up about what it’s like to be sister to a child with cancer. Sophie’s brother was just three years old when he was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma. Although her brother survived his cancer, Sophie talks about the lasting emotional impact it has had on her. She talks about her experience as a sibling, noting that cancer had a profound impact on her formative years. When a child or a young person is diagnosed with cancer, the enormity of this is felt throughout the family. In particular, siblings of any age feel the […]

  • Support for grandparents of kids with cancer

    Grandparents of Kids with Cancer is a web page which offers support for grandparents around the world, giving them a place to share their experiences with other people who have a grandchild with cancer. They advocate for the important role that grandparents play in the family, and acknowledge the emotional and practical needs of grandparents. On the website they say, “Being told that your grandchild has cancer is devastating. Not only is your grandchild going through the most traumatic experience, but your own child is also facing the worst pain imaginable. Talking to other grandparents who are going through the […]

  • Caring for a son with cancer

    This New York Times documentary follows the story of Regina Hensley and her son Andrew as he fights an aggressive form of cancer, Ewing’s Sarcoma. For years, Regina Hensley struggled with addiction, even once attempting suicide. When her son Andrew was born, he gave her a reason to live. But when he received his diagnosis at 13 years old, Regina had to search for meaning once again. ‘Without Andrew, I can’t imagine what life would be about.’ -Regina Hensley In response to the documentary, the Times received almost 100 responses from parents who were caring for a sick child. Cancer Advisor […]

  • Born with cancer

    This article, published by the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, features Carrick Stafford Wood who was born with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), a rare type of cancer. Carrick didn’t leave hospital for the first six months of his life, but finally returned home on Christmas Day. “It’s unusual [for a baby to be born with cancer]but it can happen. The most common cancer in newborns is neuroblastoma – a rare cancer of the developing nervous system (…) neuroblastomas and teratomas in newborns are usually very treatable, and most children are cured. Infantile leukemia is hard to treat, but again, with aggressive therapy, we […]

  • Help for brothers and sisters – a video for kids

    When it comes to childhood cancer, brothers and sisters of a diagnosed child have specific needs. In fact, many “well” siblings will report feeling alone, lost and neglected. While there are various materials available that have been specifically written for parents to help address these needs, we’ve found a resource that is specifically geared to kids themselves – both the diagnosed and the well sibling! The Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation in the U.S. created this fun and educational video as a way to emotionally support siblings of kids with cancer. The video is part of the Imaginary Friend Society series and was […]

  • Keeping your child healthy during cancer remission

    This factsheet from US website familydoctor.org offers some information and tips for parents when their child finishes treatment. Whether your child is in partial or complete remission, you may have questions like ‘what do I do next?’ and fears like ‘what if the cancer comes back?’ This article covers some topics including: Nutrition and exercise, Keeping records of your child’s treatment, and Late effects. To end this resources suggests Questions to ask your doctor such as: What kinds of symptoms should I look for that mean I should call you? What doctors should my child see now that the cancer is […]

  • For teachers: Cancer in the school community

    This booklet from Camp Quality offers tips for supporting children facing cancer in the school environment. This may include children with cancer, siblings of children with cancer, or children who have a parent with cancer. For any school experiencing cancer, it is important that teachers and support staff are equipped to educate the children about cancer and answer any difficult questions. Common questions from classmates include: How did they get sick? Can I catch it? Should I share things that are bothering me? They seem silly or trivial compared to what my friend is going through. What am I supposed […]

  • Kids Kicking Cancer: martial arts therapy

    Kids Kicking Cancer is a not-for-profit organisation that teaches the mind-body techniques of Martial Arts instruction, breath work and meditation to empower children beyond the pain and discomfort of disease. Kids Kicking Cancer now offers help and services to not only cancer patients, but any child in pain from a serious illness. They currently operate the Heroes’ Circle program in America, Canada, Israel and Italy and support ill children and their siblings aged 3-23 years old. Using martial arts therapy, Kids Kicking Cancer staff teaches ill children and their siblings to: Regain a sense of control over the chaos of their […]

  • Raising a child with cancer as a single mother

    On the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario website, Ashmara talks about raising her daughter as a single mother. Ashmara’s daughter Adaejah also has down syndrome. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal stories, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • From vulnerability to resilience during childhood cancer

    In this powerful ASCO journal article, a mother reflects on how her family evolved from vulnerability to resilience during childhood cancer. The childhood cancer patient is referred to as Ben, which is a pseudonym. The article explains, “Although this is the story of 4-year-old Ben, we believe that his and his family’s experiences are relevant to patients of any age who have cancer. (We preserve his anonymity to empower him to decide whether and how to tell his story of vulnerability as an adult.)” Empowerment and resilience are the main themes in this article; and ASCO offers practical tips that […]

  • Single parenting a child with cancer – Ariel’s Story

    Single Parenting a Child with Cancer is an article by Roswell Park Cancer Centre about mother Ariel and her daughter, Natalie. Natalie was diagnosed with stage 3 embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (a rare form of cancer) at four years old. Ariel offers up her tips such as find your tribe, ask for help, ask questions, be gentle with yourself and keep the faith.   Cancer Advisor has a range of personal stories, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Our Cancer Journey: Team Bella – Never give up!

    In March of 2014, our family was thrown onto the oncology roller coaster when Bella (aged four), was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (high risk). She would complete two and half years of chemotherapy bringing her into remission. Unfortunately, Bella relapsed in March 2017, eight months post treatment.     Bella would endure another eight months of intense treatment (including more intense chemotherapy followed by two bone marrow transplants). During her treatment, as her mum, carer and advocate, I decided to document her arduous journey. To provide awareness about childhood cancer and in doing so, provide hope, comfort and inspiration […]

  • Gather My Crew: coordinate help in tough times

    Gather My Crew connects people facing cancer to their community of friends and family. The online tools allows them to ask for, and receive, the practical support they actually need such as meals, transport, help with the kids and more. This can help coordinate help in tough times. How it works Our easy-to-use technology lets Gatherers (those coordinating the support) choose the help required from our comprehensive list and encourages Crew Members (friends, family, neighbours) to choose how they can help. Getting started with Gather My Crew is as simple as:  Step 1. Choose the help needed. Step 2. Invite Crew Members to lend a hand. This can […]

  • Six lessons in fatherhood and childhood cancer

    Six lessons in fatherhood from a journey with childhood cancer is a blog written by Larry Vincent – a father whose daughter has been fighting brain cancer for over 13 years. Larry outlines the six lessons he has learnt throughout his cancer experience. The blog is framed as advice for other fathers who may be starting their family cancer journey, and is thoughtful and relevant to Australian families. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for dads experiencing childhood cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Tips for telling a kid they have cancer

    A paediatric cancer specialist shares their tips for telling a kid they have cancer. For more information, Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on diagnosis. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • How play can help children cope with stress in hospital

    Did you know that play can help children cope with stress in hospital? According to child life specialist Professor Deborah Vilas play is a valuable resource to help cancer patients deal with their stress and anxiety while in hospital. If you are after more resources on childhood anxiety, take a look at our wellbeing section. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.    

  • Bereavement and Cancer – Grandparent grief

    The NSW Paediatric Palliative Care Programme share information on grandparent grief. The webpage also features a 40-minute video that interviews two grandparents who have been grieving for their grandchild. Before you go Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on End of Life including sibling grief, grandparent grief and paediatric palliative care. Please note: if you have any questions that need answering or specific content you want to see, please let us know on our Feedback and Contact. We want to help you find what you’re looking for.

  • Grandparents, Aunties, Uncles, Friends – Your support is invaluable

    Some parents have suggested that rather than just saying ‘If there’s anything I can do, let me know’, it’s more useful to think about what would truly be helpful and do it. Some great ideas include: cooking meals that can be frozen and bringing them to the hospital or home so a healthy meal is always available offering to spend time with the child so both parents can go out together and have a break doing laundry during hospital stays helping with home and garden upkeep while the family are away in hospital accompanying parents on clinic days as they […]