• Advice on friendship during your cancer journey

    This article Cancer and your friends from Redkite offers some advice around friendship during your cancer journey. Often young people find telling their friends about their cancer diagnosis particularly difficult. Even without cancer, people and relationships change – you may find that certain friendships change and new ones may emerge. Some ways to maintain friendships during this time include: Try to be honest and open with them if you can and lean on them when you need to Warn them you may be snappy or angry at times and ask them to forgive you if needed Ask them to keep inviting you Read more [...]

  • Cancer survivor creates empathy cards

    Emily McDowell has created these empathy cards for people with serious illnesses. As a cancer survivor herself, Emily understands that sometimes people don’t know what to say to someone when they are diagnosed with cancer. “The most difficult part of my illness wasn’t losing my hair, or being erroneously called ‘sir’ by Starbucks baristas, or sickness from chemo. It was the loneliness and isolation I felt when many of my close friends and family members disappeared because they didn’t know what to say, or said the absolute wrong thing without realizing it.” – Emily McDowell These quirky empathy cards will Read more [...]

  • For teachers: Cancer in the school community

    This booklet from Camp Quality offers tips for supporting children facing cancer in the school environment. This may include children with cancer, siblings of children with cancer, or children who have a parent with cancer. For any school experiencing cancer, it is important that teachers and support staff are equipped to educate the children about cancer and answer any difficult questions. Common questions from classmates include: How did they get sick? Can I catch it? Should I share things that are bothering me? They seem silly or trivial compared to what my friend is going through. What am I supposed Read more [...]

  • For teachers: 5 ways to help a student with cancer

    This article by We Are Teachers offers teachers some guidance on how to welcome a child back to school after cancer treatment. Children undergoing cancer treatment often miss significant amounts of class, and returning back to school can be a daunting experience. Teachers have an important role to play in ensuring the child has a smooth transition back into the classroom environment. This article covers some tips for teachers to help: Roll out – or roll up – the red carpet Personalise the learning Include the student in ALL class activities Facilitate friendships Talk to the child about everyday things Cancer Read more [...]

  • How my best friend supported me through my cancer journey

    One key life lesson I gained from my cancer journey is the importance of having friends who will provide unwavering support. I am grateful that my best friend, Brock, never left my side. Whether it was helping me catch up on school work, accompanying me to appointments or spending time on weekends to play sports just so I could get my mind off cancer, Brock was a constant figure during a very turbulent time in my life. In my proudest blog for You Can Connect, I share the history of my friendship with Brock and how our friendship helped me Read more [...]

  • What not to say to someone with cancer

    BBC 3 has created a video of things not to say to someone with cancer including: “So is it all working down there?” “How long do you have left?” “You’re so brave” The video also gives a good insight into various people’s personal experiences with cancer, and finishes with the question, “What should you say?” Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for friends and relatives of people with cancer, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Going back to school after cancer

    This article from 13thirty talks about the different feelings young people have about going back to school. It also offers some useful tips for how to make the transition easier. Please note: This content was written in the USA and may be targeted to US audiences. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on school, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.