• Educating teachers about brain injury

    Educating Educators about Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) is produced by Brock University and the Ontario Brain Injury Association (Canada). Many children who have brain tumors will suffer from acquired brain injuries and will need intervention with education. This resource has excellent practical information on brain injury for teachers and parents, as well as strategies for teaching children with brain injury in the classroom. It is available free online in PDF format. For more information, Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on brain injury and brain tumours. Before you go … Please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing Read more [...]

  • Dads open up about their child’s cancer treatment

    Professional British footballer and children’s writer Frank Lampard visits a CLIC Sargent Home from Home in the UK to meet with some of the dads who have a child with cancer.   These raw and powerful personal stories offer an eye-opening insight to some of the ways fathers have coped with their child’s cancer diagnosis. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for dads whose children have cancer. Or, if you have any questions that need answering, please let us know on our Feedback and Contact form. We want to help you find what you’re looking for. Before you go We’d love Read more [...]

  • Cancer Dads – The forgotten half

    Matt is a Cancer Dad whose daughter Sally was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at only 10 months old. On his blog Sweet Sally Sunshine, he shares his thoughts on what it means to be a Cancer Parent and the important role both mums and dads play when their child is receiving treatment for cancer. Cancer Advisor has a range of content pieces for dads experiencing childhood cancer. Or, if you have any questions that need answering or specific content you want to see, please let us know on our Feedback and Contact. We want to help you find what you’re Read more [...]

  • To myself on the day I found out my son has a brain tumor

    On The Mighty, Jonelle Cavill reflects on her son’s brain tumour diagnosis, treatment journey, and the ‘new normal’ that followed. She writes: “Having a medically fragile child can be overwhelming, but it does get easier. You will settle into a routine. Support groups are out there. These moms will save your life. Find them. Gain perspective. You know how you get stressed about dog hair on the hardwood floor, overflowing hampers and dishes constantly piled in the sink? Forget it. Embrace the mess and find all the joy and laughs you can in each and every moment. You and your family deserve it.” Read more [...]

  • If you know a dad with a sick child, please do this for him

    On The Mighty, mother Pauline Grady offers advice on simple and straightforward ways you can support a dad with a sick child. Her story also talks about how fathers are equally as affected as mothers by their child’s cancer diagnosis but they tend to cope with it in different ways. She writes: “One thing I remember so vividly is Rick holding Sam when they told us he had cancer. I remember my knees weakening and holding onto the counter and screaming. I turned to look at Rick and he had a steady stream of tears running down his face and Read more [...]

  • Pain Factsheet from Sydney Children’s Hospital Network

    This factsheet from the Sydney Children’s Hospital Network helps parents of small children identify if their child is in pain. Many things affect a child’s experience of pain, including: Their age Their beliefs and understanding of what is causing the pain Their beliefs in their own ability to cope Their previous pain experiences and how they have seen other people dealing with pain How they have learned to respond to pain Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on pain management but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Your parents

    Factsheet explaining how a cancer diagnosis can impact parents with tips on managing your relationship after diagnosis, from UK organisation CLIC Sargent. Please note, some information will be targeted at a UK audience.

  • Managing pain during cancer

    This content is not a substitute for medical advice. Please consult with your doctor or other health professional to make sure this information is right for you. US website Cancer.Net has a range of resources for young adults with cancer, including pain management information. Many patients and survivors experience pain during and after cancer treatment. It may help to know that cancer pain can be treated successfully for most patients. But it is important to focus on managing pain during all phases of cancer treatment and into survivorship. This website offers information on the following topics: Pain: Causes and Diagnosis Read more [...]

  • When your child dies: for parents and carers

    When your child dies is a booklet from Redkite that gives an overview of what to expect when your child dies from cancer. It is written using the real experiences of bereaved parents. This resource is adapted from the publication “One day at a time: When your child dies”, produced by CLIC Sargent, the UK’s leading cancer charity for children and young people, and their families. This booklet is a part of the One day at a time series which also includes Living without your child and When your child isn’t going to get better. Being with your child during Read more [...]

  • When your child isn’t going to get better: for parents and carers

    When your child isn’t going to get better is a booklet from Redkite that uses the real experiences of parents who are told that their child will die from cancer. This resource is adapted from the publication “One day at a time: When your child dies”, produced by CLIC Sargent, the UK’s leading cancer charity for children and young people, and their families. This booklet is a part of the One day at a time series which also includes Living without your child and When your child dies There may come a time when you are told that your child isn’t Read more [...]

  • When your child finishes cancer treatment

    This page from Redkite gives an overview of how parents might be feeling when their child finishes cancer treatment. Although finishing treatment is something parents have dreamed of, often it will bring up a mixture of emotions. Even though there may be excitement about going home, leaving the hospital can bring anxiety for many parents. Redkite offers the following tips: Keeping contact details for the medical team at your hospital Talk to your doctors about putting together a list of symptoms to check on Ask your social worker for information about getting support to help at home It is important to know Read more [...]