• One step closer to compulsory cancer education in UK

    Health education (including sex and relationship education) will become compulsory in the UK. According to a CoppaFeel press release this is one step closer to receiving compulsory cancer education. CoppaFeel is a UK breast cancer awareness charity. In their release, they explain: The guidance released today by the Department of Education shows great progress [showing]the need for pupils to be taught about not only the benefits of healthy eating and keeping fit (important factors to preventing cancer), but also the prevention of health problems and self examination. As we all know, preventing and detecting cancer early is vital in order to give Read more [...]

  • For teachers: Cancer in the school community

    This booklet from Camp Quality offers tips for supporting children facing cancer in the school environment. This may include children with cancer, siblings of children with cancer, or children who have a parent with cancer. For any school experiencing cancer, it is important that teachers and support staff are equipped to educate the children about cancer and answer any difficult questions. Common questions from classmates include: How did they get sick? Can I catch it? Should I share things that are bothering me? They seem silly or trivial compared to what my friend is going through. What am I supposed Read more [...]

  • For teachers: 5 ways to help a student with cancer

    This article by We Are Teachers offers teachers some guidance on how to welcome a child back to school after cancer treatment. Children undergoing cancer treatment often miss significant amounts of class, and returning back to school can be a daunting experience. Teachers have an important role to play in ensuring the child has a smooth transition back into the classroom environment. This article covers some tips for teachers to help: Roll out – or roll up – the red carpet Personalise the learning Include the student in ALL class activities Facilitate friendships Talk to the child about everyday things Cancer Read more [...]

  • Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital school program

    The Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital school program in Queensland caters for children and teenagers from Prep to Year 12. Prep to Year 4 students are taught in the Junior Campus on Stanley Street (located right beside the hospital). Students from Year five to 12 are taught in the classrooms on Level 8 of the hospital. Teachers will also come to you if you are unable to leave the wards. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on school, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Going back to school after cancer

    This article from 13thirty talks about the different feelings young people have about going back to school. It also offers some useful tips for how to make the transition easier. Please note: This content was written in the USA and may be targeted to US audiences. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on school, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Educating teachers about brain injury

    Educating Educators about Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) is produced by Brock University and the Ontario Brain Injury Association (Canada). Many children who have brain tumors will suffer from acquired brain injuries and will need intervention with education. This resource has excellent practical information on brain injury for teachers and parents, as well as strategies for teaching children with brain injury in the classroom. It is available free online in PDF format. For more information, Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on brain injury and brain tumours. Before you go … Please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing Read more [...]

  • Easy ways to improve your vocabulary and reading

    St. Jude Hospital’s LIFE study staff have created a one-page tip sheet on easy ways to improve your vocabulary and reading after  childhood cancer. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • School Puppet Show For Kids Stops Bullying

    Camp Quality’s travelling puppet show for primary schools answers all the difficult questions kids have about cancer. It also dispels common myths and teaches students how to be supportive and understanding of kids impacted by cancer. This will also help to prevent bullying and exclusion. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • Cancer Council: Cancer in the school community

    Cancer in the School Community is a guide for school staff who would like to support students, families and colleagues affected by cancer. This 80-page eBook was first developed in 2008 by the Cancer Council but is now in its 2015 edition. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • Monkey In My Chair – Australia

    We signed up for Monkey in My Chair and were so happy with the program. It is a great way for your child to stay in touch with friends at school. It is an American program, but there is an Australian chapter as well. I recommend this to anyone whose child is out of school for a while on treatment. The program includes: A manual for the teachers, filled with information and resources A story book which will help the teacher to explain the child’s illness and any special needs A life-sized stuffed monkey that sits on the child’s chair Read more [...]

  • I didn’t fit in

    Orla was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia aged 10. Now 14, she shares her experience with returning to school  and the challenges she faced with catching up with friends, school work and exams.

  • Thinking Ahead – Your guide to school, study and work

    Peter Macmillan Cancer Centre has created Thinking ahead: Your guide to school, study and work/ A guide for young people who have had cancer.  This engaging guide full of humorous animations aims to help young adults re-engage with their school and study. The 43-page eBook aims to provide young people with the information they require to make informed choices regarding education and vocation planning, both during treatment and in the years beyond. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor Read more [...]

  • Why kids on chemo should go to school (if they can)

    In this SoundCloud podcast Doctor Geoff talks about why kids on chemo should go to school (if they can). Doctor Geoff McCowage is a Paediatric Oncologist and Senior Staff Specialist at The Children’s Hospital at Westmead. He talks about a range of things including: The fear of our children getting fevers, The difference between viral and bacterial infections and how they are treated, When to go to the hospital, A child using a central line; and What are neutrophils and why are they important. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on school during cancer, but we’re always looking for more Read more [...]