Tag: support services

  • Ben’s story: ‘Cancer has taught me a lot’

    Diagnosis & treatment After having a sore on his neck for a few weeks Ben decided to make an appointment with his local GP in Perth. Although Ben was more preoccupied about the sore, after hearing about Ben’s history of headaches the doctor insisted on getting tests done. A few weeks later, the 23-year-old was told he had a benign brain tumour and needed surgery. However, after testing the biopsy the tumour turned out to be a malignant four centimetre mass. It was classified as stage 2 with characteristics of stage 3 astrocytoma glioma. The mass was on the right […]

  • Adult hospitals and treatment centres in Australia

    When it comes to hospital and treatment centres, teenagers and young people facing cancer have a unique set of needs. Where a young person is treated will most likely depend on their age. If you’re a young adult, you’ll go to an adult hospital. However, teenagers can be sent to either a children’s hospital or an adult facility. What hospital you go to may also depend on where you live or even what type of cancer you have. Not all hospitals offer cancer treatment, so you may have to travel, especially if you live in a regional or rural area. Some […]

  • Advice on friendship during your cancer journey

    This article Cancer and your friends from Redkite offers some advice around friendship during your cancer journey. Often young people find telling their friends about their cancer diagnosis particularly difficult. Even without cancer, people and relationships change – you may find that certain friendships change and new ones may emerge. Some ways to maintain friendships during this time include: Try to be honest and open with them if you can and lean on them when you need to Warn them you may be snappy or angry at times and ask them to forgive you if needed Ask them to keep inviting you […]

  • Children’s hospitals in Australia

    Children’s hospitals (also known as paediatric hospitals) specialise in the medical needs of children and teenagers. At children’s hospital the staff are specifically trained in taking care of children and teenagers. Chances are there will also be more child-geared activities on hand such as kids films and child entertainers. Expand the boxes below to learn more about children’s hospitals in each state. Some children’s hospitals do not treat children’s cancer, so you may need to move to a different state for treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for families who need to do this, including personal stories from […]

  • Leaving hospital

    When a child or young person finishes cancer treatment it can be a time of mixed emotions. Often this is a long anticipated event, and when it feels like they should be happy and celebrating, families may also feel anxious and overwhelmed. Leaving hospital and going home will be a different experience for each person, but Cancer Advisor has some resources on finishing treatment that may be useful. “Leaving hospital can be a scary time for a lot of families. They talk about leaving the safety net of the hospital, leaving their oncology family. Often losing this close support is the […]

  • Cultural barriers in cancer treatment: Aboriginal communities

    VJOncology (The Video Journal of Oncolgoy) has created a video about the cultural barriers in cancer treatment in regards to Aboriginal communities. In this three minute video, Jasmine Micklem, PhD, of the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute talks with Roslyn Weetra, an Aboriginal Elder and cancer survivor. Even though this video was created in South Australia, Doctor Micklem talks about these barriers as a nationwide issue. She opens with, “We found across all of the states there are disparities, particularly around mortality.” She continues that Aboriginal people are diagnosed with cancer at the same rate as other Australians, however, […]

  • Bereavement and grief

    Bereavement is the loss of someone through death, and grief is our response to loss. The grief that follows a young person’s death lasts a lifetime, and losing a child to cancer is one of the most devastating things that can happen to any family. When your child dies is a booklet from Redkite that uses the real experiences of bereaved parents to help other parents and carers following the death of their child.  It is important to remember that grief is personal and unique – everybody grieves differently and that’s okay. There will be a number of different factors that will […]

  • Looking after yourself during cancer

    This page from Redkite gives an overview of how to take care of yourself physically and emotionally during your cancer journey. A large part of dealing with cancer is learning how to take care of yourself so that you are better prepared for challenges, but also ready to enjoy good things that come your way. Redkite offers tips on: Self-care Looking after your body Looking after your mind Having fun and taking risks Redkite provides a range of support services for young people with cancer including practical tips, financial assistance, and professional counselling. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources […]

  • Relapse after cancer as a teen or young adult

    Sometimes, despite the best care and significant progress made in treatment, cancer comes back. When this happens it is called a recurrence or relapse. The likely relapse occurs is that a few of the original cancer cells survived the initial treatment. Sometimes, this is because cancer cells spread to other parts of the body and were too small to be detected during the follow-up immediately after treatment. There can be a lot to manage if you experience relapse after cancer as a teen or young adult. This factsheet by Redkite offers an insight into some of the questions you might be asking yourself […]

  • 8 resources for when your child goes back to school after treatment

    If your child has finished their cancer treatment, you might be wondering how they will transition back into full time study. Your child may be looking forward to the social aspect of school … although, they may be nervous too.  Perhaps you’re keen for a new sense of routine, and school seems like a good way to add some structure post-treatment.  You might also be wondering what information or support your child’s teacher will need. Here are some helpful resources if your child is about to start back at school, or just needs some extra support adjusting. 1  A teacher’s […]

  • If treatment doesn’t work for your cancer

    If treatment doesn’t work is a Redkite information sheet about what happens if your cancer is not curable. It includes topics such as managing emotion, avoidance and distraction, hope and making choices. Being told that your cancer is not curable and facing the idea of dying is the hardest news most people can imagine hearing. Please know that the Redkite support team are here for you and those close to you at this time. Further Reading Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on End of Life including sibling grief, grandparent grief and paediatric palliative care. Please note: if you have any questions that need […]

  • Managing work and finances during cancer

    This resource from Redkite provides an overview on managing work and finances during cancer. Practical issues like continuing work or managing bills during treatment can become significant worries for young people facing cancer. If you are a young person with cancer, or you are supporting someone through their cancer journey this web page may help. You may also be eligible for Redkite’s Financial Assistance, check out their financial help page to see if you can get any additional support. If you are eligible for this support, it may include help covering the essentials such as: Bills for electricity, gas, water, rates, […]

  • CancerAid – a free app for cancer management

    CancerAid is a free app where you can find personalised cancer information. You can also store your medical records, results and specialist’s details in a single location. The app is available on iTunes and Google Play. In this demo video, you can see how CancerAid works to empower cancer patients and those who care for them. Diagnosis in particular can be a difficult time for many patients and their family. It is common to experience feelings of isolation and overwhelm at this time. By keeping all your cancer information in one place, CancerAid can help you feel more in control of your […]

  • Financial Planning Association of Australia – Pro bono financial planning

    Overview of the pro bono financial support available from the Financial Planning Association of Australia and an application form to request advice. Psst … before you go If you haven’t already make sure to register. That way you can comment, give a ‘thumbs up’ to material you like, and submit your own content. Best of all, you’ll receive information tailored to your specific needs and preferences such as particular cancer type and age group. And you’ll receive regular notifications when fresh content, relevant to you, has been added. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.