• Neuroblastoma staging

    Cancer Australia’s factsheet provides an overview of neuroblastoma staging and the symptoms and treatment that can be experienced. It covers topics such as risk factors for the disease, how diagnosis is made, and what support services are available. Diagnostic tests will also help indicate the stage of the tumour. Staging determines where the tumour is, how large it is, which nearby organs are involved, and whether the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. This will be important for the treatment team to assess the best options, and to determine the prognosis for your child. See below for a Read more [...]

  • Explainer: What is nanomedicine and how can it improve childhood cancer treatment?

    The Conversation has published an article about how Australian researchers are looking at how they can use nanomedicine to improve the side effects of cancer treatment for children. What is nanomedicine?  Nano means tiny – a nanometre is one-billionth of a metre! – and nanomedicine is the use of nanoparticles in medicine. This article talks about using nanoparticles to transport drugs to places they wouldn’t be able to go on their own. How does that help with side effects?  Nanoparticles can be designed to: better target cancer cells, which means less damage to healthy cells break down into harmless byproducts transport Read more [...]

  • Soft tissue sarcoma

    This web page from Cancer Australia gives an overview of soft tissue sarcomas, and where they can develop. It also provides information about risk factors, symptoms, and different aspects of the cancer experience. Follow the links below to read more on each topic, or browse our other resources on soft tissue sarcomas for more information. You can also look at our phases of the cancer journey page to find information specific to diagnosis, treatment, or life after cancer. Risk factors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Support The cells of connective tissues – such as muscles, fat, blood vessels and lining of joints Read more [...]

  • How kindness can make a difference in cancer care

    The Conversation has published an article on how kindness can make a difference in cancer care. It says, “Cancer may not be life-ending, but it usually is life-changing. A cancer diagnosis instantaneously turns life upside down for patients and families. Cancer care is a “high-emotion” service, and the care team must not only effectively treat the disease but also address patients’ intense emotions.” The article explores how six types of kindness can improve cancer care. They are: deep listening, empathy, generous acts, timely care, gentle honesty and support for family caregivers. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on wellbeing, but we Read more [...]

  • Lumber puncture and bone marrow aspirate

    The Hush Foundation and the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne has produced a 12-minute video for children undergoing procedures such as lumber puncture and bone marrow aspirate. The video covers: Feeling worried; What are procedures such as lumber puncture and bone marrow aspirate; How to get ready for these procedures; Going under anaesthetic; and Waking up after the procedure. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for parents of children with cancer, but we are always looking for more content. Register now to contribute content, recommend a resource, or share your personal story.

  • Cancer vs VR

    US startup OnComfort is using virtual reality tools to reduce anxiety in cancer patients. Their apps have been shown to reduce stress, anxiety, and even the need for pain medication. The five apps use a variety of techniques to achieve this, you can learn more via these links: Aqua – an immersive experience that reduces pain and anxiety by inducing relaxation in an undersea environment AMO – an experience that uses clinical hypnosis techniques to ease pain and anxiety while a patient undergoes a short invasive procedure KIMO – for use in paediatrics, KIMO distracts and empowers patients by enabling them to fight Read more [...]

  • Children’s hospitals in Australia

    Children’s hospitals (also known as paediatric hospitals) specialise in the medical needs of children and teenagers. At children’s hospital the staff are specifically trained in taking care of children and teenagers. Chances are there will also be more child-geared activities on hand such as kids films and child entertainers. Expand the boxes below to learn more about children’s hospitals in each state. Some children’s hospitals do not treat children’s cancer, so you may need to move to a different state for treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources for families who need to do this, including personal stories from Read more [...]

  • Transport and accommodation assistance NSW

    The Isolated Patients Travel and Accommodation Assistance Scheme (IPTAAS) is a NSW Government initiative.  Designed to help isolated patients, IPTAAS offer financial assistance towards transport and accommodation costs.  This is for patients who need to travel long distances for specialist medical treatment that is not available locally. To be eligible to claim through IPTAAS you must meet the following criteria: Be a resident of NSW or Lord Howe Island Hold a Medicare card Live more than 100km from the nearest treating specialist or your combined trips to and from the specialist exceeds 200km/week Specialist treatment not available locally Ineligible for any other Read more [...]

  • Total body irradiation

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is the term used when radiotherapy is given to the whole body. Radiotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses high energy rays, similar to x-rays. TBI may be used in conjunction with high dose chemotherapy drugs. This is often used in preparation for a stem cell or bone marrow transplant.  This fact sheet from the Paediatric Integrated Cancer Service (PICS) provides information on total body irradiation. The resource gives an overview of: What is total body irradiation? Getting ready for total body irradiation What is it like? Taking care of your child during total body Read more [...]

  • World first: Australia produces childhood cancer data set

    Cancer Australia has produced the world’s first national data on diagnosis and survival rates of childhood cancer. The data set analyses early diagnosis and survival rates for 16 of the most common types of childhood cancers. The data is based on figures collected between 2006 and 2010 by the Australian Childhood Cancer Registry from hospitals across the country. In collaboration with Cancer Council Queensland, Cancer Australia Developed a method to standardise the information, hoping that this may be replicated overseas in the future. About 100 Australian children die each year from cancer, making it the main cause of death from disease. Read more [...]

  • Relapse after cancer as a teen or young adult

    Sometimes, despite the best care and significant progress made in treatment, cancer comes back. When this happens it is called a recurrence or relapse. The likely relapse occurs is that a few of the original cancer cells survived the initial treatment. Sometimes, this is because cancer cells spread to other parts of the body and were too small to be detected during the follow-up immediately after treatment. There can be a lot to manage if you experience relapse after cancer as a teen or young adult. This factsheet by Redkite offers an insight into some of the questions you might be asking yourself Read more [...]

  • Cancer treatment for teens and young adults

    This factsheet from Redkite gives an overview on cancer treatment for teens and young adults including: types of cancer treatment, complementary therapy and cancer, clinical trials, side effects, and sticking with treatment. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on cancer treatment, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource. Join our community Cancer Advisor is an online platform with a wide range of cancer advice and knowledge. We provide information for families of children and young people with cancer. You’ll be directed to external websites and sources featuring reliable information Read more [...]

  • Ellie Douglas – Cancer Q&A

    Ellie was 17 when she was diagnosed with hodgkin lymphoma 2a. In her first YouTube video, she answers some questions about her diagnosis and treatment and how she is feeling. In particular, she talks about losing her hair. This happened within 15 days of her first chemotherapy treatment, and Ellie expresses that she actually felt relieved. The uncertainty about when it would happen, how much hair she would lose, whether she would lose it all at once; these questions made her feel anxious, so she was relieved when it finally happened.   When a subscriber asked her how to help Read more [...]

  • A glossary of terms relating to childhood cancer

    Cancer Australia has published a glossary of terms relating to children’s cancer. Receiving a cancer diagnosis can also mean being exposed to a huge range of new words, terms and phrases. It can help you when dealing with medial professionals to be on top of what all these terms mean. The government website Cancer Australia has created a list of over 1,000 terms listed in alphabetical order. They received this information from Cancer Help UK – the patient information website of Cancer Research UK. We’ve included some of the more common ones below, but it’s worthwhile clicking through to read the rest Read more [...]

  • Going through chemotherapy — Jana’s story

    Redkite and jimmyteens.tv have created a video about 21-year-old Jana experiences of going through chemotherapy and the cancer treatment process. “We thought it would be a really good idea to film it because having those memories of the most challenging times of your life, helps you remember what it felt like,” she says. Jana also talks about how challenging she has found finishing treatment and getting back to normal but how the support from her family gave her so much strength. Cancer Advisor has a range of personal stories, but we are always looking for more content. Please join our community to Read more [...]

  • Germ cell tumours overview

    This overview of germ cell tumours is by Cancer Australia, and provides information about the symptoms that might be experienced, as well as information about different treatments that may be used. Germ cell tumours occur when abnormal germ cells grow in an uncontrolled way. A germ cell is the type of cell that develops into eggs (in the ovaries) or sperm (in the testicles). Germ cell tumours can develop before or after birth, and can occur in the ovaries or testicles, or in other parts of the body. This is because sometimes, when babies are developing in the womb, germ Read more [...]

  • Liver tumours in children

    Like all cancers, liver tumours occur when abnormal cells grow in an uncontrolled way. In this article from Cancer Australia you can read about the different types of liver tumours that can develop in children, including: Hepatoblastoma usually occurs in children under 3 years of age and does not usually spread to other parts of the body. Hepatocellular carcinoma usually occurs in older children and teenagers, and often spreads to other parts of the body. Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver usually occurs in children aged 5–10, and often spreads throughout the liver or to the lungs. Infantile choriocarcinoma starts in the developing baby and Read more [...]