Tag: work and study

  • Ben’s story: ‘Cancer has taught me a lot’

    Diagnosis & treatment After having a sore on his neck for a few weeks Ben decided to make an appointment with his local GP in Perth. Although Ben was more preoccupied about the sore, after hearing about Ben’s history of headaches the doctor insisted on getting tests done. A few weeks later, the 23-year-old was told he had a benign brain tumour and needed surgery. However, after testing the biopsy the tumour turned out to be a malignant four centimetre mass. It was classified as stage 2 with characteristics of stage 3 astrocytoma glioma. The mass was on the right […]

  • Coping with cancer at university

    In this article on UK news website The Guardian, Robin Cannone shares his personal experience of university as a young person with cancer. Cannone was diagnosed with a type of lymphoma, the most common cancers among 15- to 24-year-olds, representing 21% of diagnoses in the UK. I was looking through my hospital room window and imagining what I’d be doing if I hadn’t been diagnosed with cancer. I wanted to be going clubbing and worrying about university deadlines like a normal 20-year-old – not stuck indoors with a syringe in my arm. -Robin Cannone, young person with cancer Cannone acknowledges the important part that […]

  • Leaving hospital

    When a child or young person finishes cancer treatment it can be a time of mixed emotions. Often this is a long anticipated event, and when it feels like they should be happy and celebrating, families may also feel anxious and overwhelmed. Leaving hospital and going home will be a different experience for each person, but Cancer Advisor has some resources on finishing treatment that may be useful. “Leaving hospital can be a scary time for a lot of families. They talk about leaving the safety net of the hospital, leaving their oncology family. Often losing this close support is the […]

  • Working through treatment

    In this 11-minute TED Talk, lawyer Sarah Donnelly talks about her experiences working through treatment for breast cancer.  You can find a range of resources on work and study here. “Back at work I handed over the urgent things (…) but at that moment work wasn’t my priority. I was thinking how I was going to tell my friends and family I had cancer. I was wondering if my partner and I would ever have an opportunity to start a family (…) Work was about to play a huge role in my treatment and recovery. My job that would give me […]

  • One step closer to compulsory cancer education in UK

    Health education (including sex and relationship education) will become compulsory in the UK. According to a CoppaFeel press release this is one step closer to receiving compulsory cancer education. CoppaFeel is a UK breast cancer awareness charity. In their release, they explain: The guidance released today by the Department of Education shows great progress [showing]the need for pupils to be taught about not only the benefits of healthy eating and keeping fit (important factors to preventing cancer), but also the prevention of health problems and self examination. As we all know, preventing and detecting cancer early is vital in order to give […]

  • ONTrac at Peter Mac

    The ONTrac at Peter Mac Cancer Service is located at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Victoria, Australia. Their multidisciplinary team of health professionals works together to ensure that young people are supported before, during and after their cancer treatment. This web page includes information on clinical services for young people like: diagnosis and disease management, palliative and survivorship care, general adolescent health, emotional and mental health concerns, fertility and sexual health, physical and nutritional wellbeing, school and vocation support, and family-focused treatments. The service also provides : Secondary consultation service, Professional development, education and training, research and data collection program, […]

  • For teachers: Cancer in the school community

    This booklet from Camp Quality offers tips for supporting children facing cancer in the school environment. This may include children with cancer, siblings of children with cancer, or children who have a parent with cancer. For any school experiencing cancer, it is important that teachers and support staff are equipped to educate the children about cancer and answer any difficult questions. Common questions from classmates include: How did they get sick? Can I catch it? Should I share things that are bothering me? They seem silly or trivial compared to what my friend is going through. What am I supposed […]

  • For teachers: 5 ways to help a student with cancer

    This article by We Are Teachers offers teachers some guidance on how to welcome a child back to school after cancer treatment. Children undergoing cancer treatment often miss significant amounts of class, and returning back to school can be a daunting experience. Teachers have an important role to play in ensuring the child has a smooth transition back into the classroom environment. This article covers some tips for teachers to help: Roll out – or roll up – the red carpet Personalise the learning Include the student in ALL class activities Facilitate friendships Talk to the child about everyday things Cancer […]

  • Going back to school after cancer

    This article from 13thirty talks about the different feelings young people have about going back to school. It also offers some useful tips for how to make the transition easier. Please note: This content was written in the USA and may be targeted to US audiences. Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on school, but we’re always looking for more content. Leave a comment below, share your own story or recommend a resource.

  • Advocate for your rights

    What are your rights as someone with cancer? And how can you protect or advocate for these rights? This factsheet by Work After Cancer is funded by the Australian Government to help you understand the law and what your rights and responsibilities are as a person with cancer. Your rights and responsibilities as a patient with cancer: You have a right to fair treatment You do not have to disclose your cancer diagnosis You cannot be denied a job because of cancer You can ask for a reasonable work adjustments You have a responsibility to inform your employer when taking […]

  • Educating teachers about brain injury

    Educating Educators about Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) is produced by Brock University and the Ontario Brain Injury Association (Canada). Many children who have brain tumors will suffer from acquired brain injuries and will need intervention with education. This resource has excellent practical information on brain injury for teachers and parents, as well as strategies for teaching children with brain injury in the classroom. It is available free online in PDF format. For more information, Cancer Advisor has a range of resources on brain injury and brain tumours. Before you go … Please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing […]

  • 8 resources for when your child goes back to school after treatment

    If your child has finished their cancer treatment, you might be wondering how they will transition back into full time study. Your child may be looking forward to the social aspect of school … although, they may be nervous too.  Perhaps you’re keen for a new sense of routine, and school seems like a good way to add some structure post-treatment.  You might also be wondering what information or support your child’s teacher will need. Here are some helpful resources if your child is about to start back at school, or just needs some extra support adjusting. 1  A teacher’s […]

  • Easy ways to improve your vocabulary and reading

    St. Jude Hospital’s LIFE study staff have created a one-page tip sheet on easy ways to improve your vocabulary and reading after  childhood cancer. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • Managing work and finances during cancer

    This resource from Redkite provides an overview on managing work and finances during cancer. Practical issues like continuing work or managing bills during treatment can become significant worries for young people facing cancer. If you are a young person with cancer, or you are supporting someone through their cancer journey this web page may help. You may also be eligible for Redkite’s Financial Assistance, check out their financial help page to see if you can get any additional support. If you are eligible for this support, it may include help covering the essentials such as: Bills for electricity, gas, water, rates, […]

  • School Puppet Show For Kids Stops Bullying

    Camp Quality’s travelling puppet show for primary schools answers all the difficult questions kids have about cancer. It also dispels common myths and teaches students how to be supportive and understanding of kids impacted by cancer. This will also help to prevent bullying and exclusion. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • Cancer Council: Cancer in the school community

    Cancer in the School Community is a guide for school staff who would like to support students, families and colleagues affected by cancer. This 80-page eBook was first developed in 2008 by the Cancer Council but is now in its 2015 edition. Before you go … If you’ve been affected by childhood or young adult cancer, please share your insights and knowledge to help other people facing cancer. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.

  • Dealing with money, work and study (practical issues)

    Factsheet from the Australian Cancer Survivorship Centre with information about dealing with money and returning to work or study. Psst … before you go If you haven’t already make sure to register. That way you can comment, give a ‘thumbs up’ to material you like, and submit your own content. Best of all, you’ll receive information tailored to your specific needs and preferences such as particular cancer type and age group. And you’ll receive regular notifications when fresh content, relevant to you, has been added. Join the Cancer Advisor community and register now.